IBM Watson

Accelerating the Nutrition Revolution with Cognitive Computing

When I was a teenager, I suffered from a bunch of pesky health problems, including migraines and sinusitis. By age 16, I’d had enough. Determined to feel better, I read dozens of nutrition books and tried a wide variety of diets. I found lots of conflicting theories and advice. Ultimately, after three years of experimentation […]

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The Future of Knowledge Work: Turbocharging Expertise

The first serious computer program I wrote in high school was a basic “expert system” to help my dad, a judge in India, handle auto accident compensation cases. Back then, we imagined a world where expertise of all sorts could be captured in computer system, but, as you can imagine, I ran into all the […]

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Live Blogging from the Cognitive Colloquium

When I was a teenager, I suffered from a bunch of pesky health problems, including migraines and sinusitis. By age 16, I’d had enough. Determined to feel better, I read dozens of nutrition books and tried a wide variety of diets. I found lots of conflicting theories and advice. Ultimately, after three years of experimentation […]

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Enhanced Collaboration in the Cognitive Era

Today, 70 years after the first electronic computers were invented, most interactions between people and machines are conducted the old fashioned way: humans tap on tiny smartphone screens or type on computer keyboards. Human-to-computer interactions are not typically intuitive, pro-active or exciting. All of that’s must change as we move into the era of cognitive […]

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How Cognitive Computing Can Help You Shop Smarter

If you have kids, you probably know about the simulation game, Minecraft. It‘s a multiplatform game that enables players to build fantasy worlds out of textured cubes in a 3D space. This game has been a favorite of kids and teens since its debut in November 2011. Yet unless you’re a Minecraft maven you might […]

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Come Back for Live Blogging from the Cognitive Colloquium

Return to the THINK blog Wednesday morning at 9:30 for day-long live blogging from the Cognitive Colloquium at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. You’ll hear from Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer, John Kelly, senior vice president at IBM, and a large roster of top scientists with expertise in cognitive and immersive systems.

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Cognitive Technologies are Critical to Improving Healthcare

In the United States today, three-quarters of the people who suffer from rare diseases are children, according to the NIH. Making matters worse, it’s often difficult to detect and diagnose rare diseases for kids, since youngsters can’t describe symptoms the way adults can. This is why IBM is working with Boston Children’s Hospital on a project […]

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Live Blogging from the Cognitive Colloquium

7:00 PM ET Embodied Cognition Session Chair: Dr. Guru Banavar, Vice President, Cognitive Computing Research, IBM Research Dr. Myron (Ron) Diftler, Robonaut Project Leader, NASA Johnson Space Center Dr. Gaurav Sukhatme, Co-Director, Robotics Research Lab, University of Southern California Paul Hermes, Entrepreneur in Residence, Medtronic Grady Booch, Chief Scientist for Software Engineering, IBM Research Some […]

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The Rise of Cognitive Business

When the original Watson won on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! in 2011, it was one computer tucked away in a room at IBM Research. Now it’s in our cloud, available anywhere. Back then, Watson consisted of a single software application powered by five core technologies. Today, it includes 28 cognitive services. Each represents a […]

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Watson: An Incubator for Startups and Innovation

IBM has long played a major role in Silicon Valley. We built a manufacturing plant there in 1943 and opened our IBM Research lab in San Jose in 1956–since then producing a string of technology breakthroughs including the first disk drive, the first data mining algorithms and essential advances in nanotechnology.  My dad got his […]

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