Hybrid

The ever-growing cloud opportunity

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IBM Cloud Private expanding opportunityModernizing existing systems and apps is no small task and transitioning to cloud can be fraught with risk.

As a result, most companies are taking a gradual approach to transforming their organizations on the cloud while continuing to control their IT infrastructure on-premises for their most critical or sensitive business processes. Analysts estimate worldwide spending on cloud IT infrastructure to total $62.2 billion this year, an increase of 31.1 percent year over year.

Hybrid cloud, a combination of public and private clouds, has become one of the best options for these incumbent businesses. They’re putting new workloads on the public cloud while using on-premises private clouds for mission-critical workloads. In the overall cloud market, analysts expect on-premises private clouds to account for nearly 20 percent in 2018, a 19.3 percent increase from last year.

Last year, we launched IBM Cloud Private, a container-based cloud platform, built as open source technology, that runs on-premises and includes self-service deployment, monitoring, logging and security. In less than a year since its release, hundreds of top companies now rely on IBM Cloud Private to help modernize their operations and build better digital experiences for their customers. It also connects them to new technologies including AI, blockchain and data science.

When we set out to develop IBM Cloud Private, we focused on giving businesses an easy way to transition their existing systems at scale and with security in mind. We also wanted to address integration, which was previously the industry’s missing link when moving workloads to the cloud, in my view. Many of our clients appreciate that IBM Cloud Private gives their developers easy access to our middleware, data and analytics products since they have made major investments in IBM software including WebSphere, Db2 or MQ over the years.

Major organizations such as the New Zealand Police and Aflac Insurance in Japan are using it to create flexible, secured cloud architectures that enable them to modernize legacy applications and connect private cloud systems to the public cloud. The New Zealand Police recently started relying on IBM Cloud Private to help upgrade its existing systems and launch a new mobile-based communications service to explore ways to reduce crime in its communities. Similarly, Japan’s Aflac Insurance is looking to increase the efficiency of its operations and reduce the time it takes to develop new applications and services.

During its first year on the market alone, IBM Cloud Private has positioned hundreds of companies to meet growing demands of their industries through innovation. This week, IBM added new AI capabilities to the platform, including IBM Watson Speech-to-Text for the first time in our on-premises environment and IBM Watson Assistant. Also for the first time, IBM Cloud Private is available on the IBM Public Cloud, which enables clients to create fully flexible hybrid cloud environments by being able to easily move their enterprise workloads from on-premises systems to the IBM Cloud.

Our hybrid cloud offerings provide the services enterprises need to support their existing operations in a way that makes it easier for them to generate new ideas and applications that increase satisfaction for their customers.

Learn more about IBM Cloud Private.

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