Leading Consumer Industry Companies Address Food Safety Worldwide

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This week was big win for the global food system to boost the confidence, trust, and ultimately, taste buds of consumers around the world.

Building on our conversations at the Consumer Goods Forum this summer, IBM along with a consortium of partners, are proud to announce another big step towards increasing food safety with blockchain.

According to a new report, “Tomorrow’s Value Chain: How Blockchain Drives Visibility, Trust and Efficiency,” produced by IBM during The Consumer Goods Forum this year, blockchain will fundamentally change how companies interact and do business together.

That is why we’re honored to announce we are working with leading retailers and food companies–such as Dole, Driscoll’s, Golden State Foods, Kroger, McCormick and Company, McLane Company, Nestlé, Tyson Foods, Unilever and Walmart—to identify the most urgent areas across the global supply chain that could benefit from blockchain.

Blockchain is ideally suited to make the global food supply chain, which is currently all analog, more transparent for all participants –including growers, suppliers, processors, distributors, retailers, regulators, consumers and more. It can gain permissioned access to trusted information, such as the origin and state of food for their transactions. This enables food providers and other members of the ecosystem to more easily trace contaminated products to their source in a short amount of time and stem the spread of illnesses.

This is increasingly important when we read about the recent outbreak of salmonella in papayas in the U.S. this month, for example, where identifying the farm source of contamination took more than two months, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The results of IBM’s recent pilots using fully integrated, enterprise-grade production blockchain platform, as well as our consulting services, have shown blockchain can accelerate the tracing of food from days and weeks, to mere seconds.

For example, during recent blockchain projects with major shipping and retail organizations, IBM consultants have been able to improve food safety traceability by 99.9 percent and decrease trade document workflow by 97 percent, potentially unlocking millions of dollars in cost savings and market capital.

I invite you to read more about the announcement, our revolutionary IBM Blockchain Platform, which is available via the IBM Cloud and to get in touch with us to discuss how your organization can quickly activate their business networks and access the vital capabilities needed to successfully develop, operate, govern and secure these networks. Blockchain is the future of building and maintaining consumer trust.

 

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn. It has been modified for optimal viewing.

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