Overview

The Corporate Service Corps simultaneously delivers excellence in leadership development and impact for communities facing critical challenges while demonstrating IBM's innovation in skills, technology and citizen diplomacy.

We send out 500 IBMers per year on Corporate Service Corps assignments. What if every company in the Fortune 500 did the same? It would change the view about what corporations can do for society.

Stanley Litow
IBM’s Vice President of Corporate
Citizenship and Corporate Affairs

Since its launch in 2008, the Corporate Service Corps (CSC) program has contributed over 3000 participants on over 275 teams to nearly 40 countries around the world, delivering over $70 million in market value consulting on over 1000 projects.

Yale study on CSC focus of Aspen Institute Case Competition

Trisha King, Aspen Institute | May 3, 2017

MBA students win nearly $35,000 in scholarship money by tackling business challenges at the intersection of corporate profitability and positive impact.

New York, NY, May 3, 2017 – Eighteen MBA students – selected from close to 1,000 worldwide – have won a share of nearly $35,000 in scholarship money by tackling a real-life business challenge at the intersection of corporate profitability and positive social and environmental impact.

‘Let Girls Learn’ Brings Education Tech to Rural Ghana

Aida Akl, Voice of America | Apr 14, 2017

More than 62 million girls around the world are not attending school. But through the U.S. government’s ‘Let Girls Learn’ initiative, a multilateral effort is putting education technology and a future at their fingertips.

In parts of the developing world, girls are expected to do house chores, care for siblings, and fetch water. But they are last in line after their brothers to get an education, if at all. And if they are lucky enough to go to school, they sometimes are shut out.

IBM wins Corporate Citizenship Award from Chief Executive Magazine

Chief Executive | Jan 12, 2017

On January 12, at an event in New York City, Chief Executive honored companies for their corporate citizenship efforts. These were specific projects and programs that went well beyond writing a check to meaningfully improving communities, while remaining integral to their firm’s mission and goals. Many of the programs included substantial CEO involvement.

Winners of the 2017 program were selected by size—small, medium or large—within 10 categories.

Program details

IBM launched the pro bono Corporate Service Corps in 2008 primarily as a vehicle for global leadership development. Teams of from eight to 15 members partner with government, business and civic leaders in emerging markets to address high-priority issues such as education, health and economic development. Individual CSC teams spend three months learning about the communities and the problems they’ll address before spending four weeks on the ground working with local organizations and other relevant local stakeholders to develop recommendations for short-term and long-term actions. The program has achieved its primary goal—equipping IBMers for the challenges of working and leading in a global organization. Many of them on return call their deployments life changing. Since its launch, the CSC has emerged as a new model for leadership development and social engagement in the 21st Century. It’s a living laboratory for experiments and learning at a time when corporations are under incredible pressure to transform the way they operate because of globalization and technology shifts, and when economic challenges and social instability threaten to slow human progress.

Case study

IBM Corporate Service Corps Leadership 2016

CSC Empowering Women Infographic 2016

IBM Corporate Service Corps Impact Report 2016

GFN case study

IBM CSC John Deere Case Study 2011

IBM CSC FedEx Case Study 2011