IBM relies on a series of metrics to measure our corporate responsibility efforts every year. Below is a summary of the data in several important areas. Our key performance indicators (KPIs) for various parts of the business are also noted, along with some explanation.

KPI denotes key performance indicator


Employees

Learning

We continue to support our employees and the business in building and modernizing the critical skills needed to innovate, work in new ways and adopt a growth mindset. IBM Learning creates learning solutions based on users’ needs and wants. We offer personalized, real-time and inspiring learning experiences delivered through a cognitive and cloud-based digital platform. We use Watson Analytics to measure the impact through Net Promoter Score, analyze the emotional sentiment and predict digital learning preferences. These practices allow us to hone our learning solutions to better enable IBMers to achieve their full potential, provide value to our customers and support our strategic imperatives of cognitive, cloud and agile.

Learning 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Learning investments worldwide ($M) KPI 477 525 482 484 498
Learning hours worldwide (M) 33 40 25.8 25 26.7
Learning hours per employee KPI 78 82 62.5 58.3 56

Women in the workforce

IBM remains dedicated to addressing the specific needs of women in our workforce and to creating work-life and career development programs that address these needs. We are committed to the progress and leadership development of women in our workforce and to providing opportunities across the more than 175 countries where we do business.

Women in the workforce % KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Global workforce 30.0 30.1 31.1 31.4 31.8
Global executives 22.3 23.2 23.9 24.0 24.0
Managers 25.6 26.0 26.5 26.4 26.7

Global illness/injury rate

Global illness/injury rate 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Total number (per 100 employees) 0.29 0.30 0.42 0.33 0.30

Volunteering

IBM supports and encourages employees and retirees in skills-based volunteering in their local communities around the world. Since 2003, when IBM launched its volunteering enablement initiative, 287,000 registered users have logged over 20 million hours of service worldwide.

Retiree and employee volunteer hours (K) 2012* 2013 2014 2015 2016
IBM worldwide 1,581 1,496 1,532 1,195 1,248

*IBM celebrated its Centennial in 2011 – 2012, and the exceptionally high volunteer hours reflect the many special volunteer projects associated with the Centennial.


Giving

IBM tracks and reports global corporate contributions by issue, geography and type of grant. Giving by issue reflects our goal to maintain education as our primary focus by using IBM’s innovative skills and technology to improve student performance. Giving by geography helps us to understand the alignment of our resources with our global operations. But the type of our giving — a combination of services, technology (including software) and cash — is what we believe distinguishes IBM. We have long believed that money alone does not solve problems. Innovative solutions are also required to transform approaches to societal challenge and achieve measurable outcomes.

While education is our highest priority, we cannot achieve educational improvement without understanding its connection to other issues. Maintaining strategic investments in human services, culture, health and the environment gives us a more complete picture of how to effectively transform education. In addition, it is vitally important that we maintain the flexibility to address new initiatives and meet extraordinary external conditions such as disaster relief and recovery.

The geographic distribution of our citizenship contributions reflects how IBM operates — in a global, fully integrated fashion. Some of our contributions are given on a globally competitive basis, so geographical distribution may vary due to the number and quality of applications.

We do not set goals for percentage change in contributions year-to-year, nor for giving by geography or by type of contribution. We focus instead on increasing the quality of our work with organizations on projects that use our most innovative solutions successfully and have a significant, measureable impact on key social issues. Current trends in contributions will not necessarily continue, but rather will be determined within the framework of our goal to increase the effectiveness of our contributions.

Global corporate contributions by issue ($M) KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Education 143.0 147.1 149.2 154.8 208.4
Culture 3.7 3.0 3.6 3.4 4.0
Human services 16.9 17.3 20.1 18.6 15.9
Health 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.6 5.2
Other 24.8 32 30.7 23.9 20.8
Environment 5.2 5.0 3.1 0.6 3.5
Total 197.1 207.9 210.4 205.0 257.8
Global corporate contributions by type ($M) KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Cash 42.6 41.4 36.8 35.5 41.8
Technology 99.2 100.2 104.4 109.5 171.7
Services 55.3 66.3 69.2 60.0 44.3
Total 197.1 207.9 210.4 205.0 257.8
Global corporate contributions by geography ($M) KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
North America* 77 83.5 84.7 65.4 99.2
Asia Pacific 35.9 37.5 40.3 42.6 39.3
Europe, Middle East, Africa 64.4 65.7 64.8 82.2 104.2
Latin America 19.8 21.2 20.6 14.8 15.1
Total 197.1 207.9 210.4 205.0 257.8

*Combined Canada with U.S. as North America – both countries reported separately in previous reports.


Environment

IBM maintains goals covering the range of its environmental programs, including climate protection, energy and water conservation, pollution prevention, waste management, and product stewardship. These goals and our performance against them are discussed in this report. The goals identified here as KPIs are based on stakeholder interest and materiality. IBM considers all of its goals to be important metrics of the company’s performance against its commitment to environmental protection.

Energy conservation

IBM’s goal is to achieve annual energy conservation savings equal to 3.5 percent of IBM’s total energy use. In 2016, IBM again achieved this goal, attaining a 5.3 percent savings from its energy conservation projects.

Energy conservation KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
As % of total energy use 6.5 6.7 6.7 6.3 5.3

Renewable electricity procurement

IBM’s renewable electricity procurement goal is to purchase 20 percent of our electricity consumption from renewable sources by 2020, over and above the quantity of renewable energy provided as part of the mix of electricity that we purchase from the grid. In 2016, IBM contracted with its utility suppliers to purchase approximately 783,000 megawatt-hours of renewable electricity, representing 21.5 percent of our global electricity consumption and exceeding our goal four years early.

Renewable electricity procurement KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
As % of total electricity purchases 9.8 11.8 14.2 16.2 21.5

CO2 emissions reduction

Our third-generation CO2 emissions reduction goal is to reduce CO2 emissions associated with our energy consumption 35 percent by year-end 2020, against base year 2005 and adjusted for acquisitions and divestitures. In 2016, IBM achieved and exceeded this goal four years early as IBM reduced its operational CO2 emissions by 38.1 percent against the 2005 baseline.

CO2 emissions reduction KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
As % of 2005 baseline CO2 emissions 15.7 24.7 27.7 28.7 38.1

Product energy efficiency KPI

IBM has two goals related to product energy efficiency. The first goal is to improve the computing power delivered for each kilowatt-hour of electricity used with each new generation or model of a product. The second goal is to qualify its new server and storage products to the ENERGY STAR program criteria where practical, and where criteria have been developed for the specific server or storage product type. Please see the 2016 product stewardship goals and performance table for information regarding performance against these goals.

Nonhazardous waste recycling

Our goal is to send an average of 75 percent (by weight) of the nonhazardous waste generated at locations managed by IBM to be recycled. In 2016, we recovered and recycled 86 percent of our nonhazardous waste.

Nonhazardous waste recycling KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
% by weight sent for recycling of total generated 87 86 86 85 86

Product end-of-life management

IBM’s goal is to reuse or recycle end-of-life IT products such that the amount of product waste sent by IBM’s product end-of-life management (PELM) operations to landfills or incineration for treatment does not exceed a combined 3 percent (by weight) of the total amount processed. In 2016, IBM’s PELM operations sent only 0.6 percent of the total processed to landfill or incineration facilities for treatment.

Product end-of-life management KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
% by weight of total processed sent by IBM’s PELM operations to landfill or incineration for treatment 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.6

Water conservation KPI

In early 2016, IBM established a new goal to achieve ongoing year-to-year reductions in water withdrawals at data centers and other large IBM locations in water-stressed regions. In 2016, IBM reduced water withdrawals at these locations by 6.6 percent against a 2015 baseline year.


Supply chain

2016 global supplier spending fell $1.1 billion — primarily related to declines in IBM hardware revenue — with the largest decreases in Logistics Procurement (25 percent) and Production Procurement (19 percent). Our largest regional decrease was 9 percent in Asia Pacific. Total spending with diverse suppliers (first-tier) increased slightly from 2015, driven by diverse spending outside the U.S., and reached 8.5 percent of our global total spend.

Supplier spending by category 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Services and general procurement (%) 64 67 71 79 82
Production procurement (%) 33 30 26 18 15
Logistics procurement (%) 3 3 3 3 3
Services and general procurement ($B) 22.8 22.1 21.6 20.3 20.3
Production procurement ($B) 11.5 9.7 7.8 4.7 3.8
Logistics procurement ($B) 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.6
Supplier spending by location 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
North America (%) 35 36 37 42 43
Asia Pacific (%) 35 35 33 31 29
Europe, Middle East, Africa (%) 21 21 23 22 23
Latin America (%) 9 8 7 5 5
North America ($B) 12.4 11.8 11.2 10.8 10.6
Asia Pacific ($B) 12.4 11.4 9.9 8 7.3
Europe, Middle East, Africa ($B) 7.4 7.0 6.9 5.8 5.6
Latin America ($B) 3.1 2.6 2.3 1.2 1.2
First-tier spending KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Total U.S. ($B) 10.7 10.2 9.8 9.3 9.7
Diverse U.S. ($B) 1.7 1.9 1.5 1.3 1.3
Diverse non-U.S. ($M) 939 917 883 718 744

The decrease in supplier improvement plans completed and accepted was due to a lesser number of social responsibility full audits and re-audits conducted in 2016. This is part of our normal assessment cadence, as EICC audits have a two-year duration which affects (up and down) the number of audits in the successive calendar year. IBM requires an improvement plan for all suppliers with noncompliance discovered during an EICC audit or re-audit of their facilities; implementation of the plans may begin in one calendar year and complete in the next.

Supplier improvement plans KPI 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Completed and accepted 311 175 141 161 117

Download the 2016 report