20th Global C-Suite Study
Build Your Trust Advantage
Leadership in the era of data and AI everywhere

We spoke with more than 13,000 C-suite executives worldwide about data, the value they derive from it, and what it takes to lead in a world awash with data.
Understand how an elite group of enterprises—we call them Torchbearers—are commanding data and trust to their spectacular advantage in the 20th Edition IBM Global C-suite Study.

Bookmark this report  

Are you a Torchbearer?

Find out where your organization stands when it comes to trust.

Try the C-suite Assessment Tool
Bookmark this report  


We spoke with more than 13,000 C-suite executives worldwide about data, the value they derive from it, and what it takes to lead in a world awash with data.
Understand how an elite group of enterprises—we call them Torchbearers—are commanding data and trust to their spectacular advantage in the 20th Edition IBM Global C-suite Study.

Are you a Torchbearer?

Find out where your organization stands when it comes to trust.

Try the C-suite Assessment Tool
Study overview
The four stages of data leadership
Torchbearers
As a group, they have excelled in fusing their data strategy to their business strategy, with trust as the plumb line. Operating in a data-rich culture, they generate higher revenue growth and profitability than their peers.
Explorers
Enterprises in this group experiment with ways to integrate their business and data strategies and extract value from data. They don’t consistently realize its highest possible value, but they see the trust economy as a path to achieving outstanding mutual benefit.
The four stages of data leadership
Torchbearers
As a group, they have excelled in fusing their data strategy to their business strategy, with trust as the plumb line. Operating in a data-rich culture, they generate higher revenue growth and profitability than their peers.
Customers
How to win in the trust economy
Torchbearers
Aspirationals
Using data to strengthen customer trust, to a large extent
43%
|
82%
“Customers expect personalization, underpinned by data. However, there remains a question as to how much information customers will share, given the erosion of trust.”
CEO
| Banking
Australia

The ways in which organizations transparently share data about their offerings, take responsibility for the personal data they collect, and use data to their customers’ benefit determine their market position. The trust customers once gave, almost blindly, to brands and institutions has been slipping away for some time. They now demand something else: transparency of data associated with products and services and, in the case of personal data, assurances that it’s used in a fair manner and kept safe.

With data breaches making headlines monthly, if not weekly, data privacy is an important competitive advantage. Customers demand transparency about their personal data today; tomorrow, their expectations could escalate. Organizations that lack trust—cut off from prized personal data—could find themselves slipping further behind.

Torchbearers have moved well beyond understanding customer needs. They are using customer data to transform their workflows to deliver value at every customer touchpoint. In fact, eight in ten Torchbearers are pursuing a singular advantage: they have turned to data to strengthen, to a great extent, the level of trust their customers have in them. Yet, fewer than half of Aspirationals are doing the same.
Take action

Step one
Pursue customer trust. Start with data transparency, including establishing credentials; engaging in a reciprocal exchange of data for customer value; and committing to data security.
Step two
Earn it or lose it. Companies that earn customer trust are more likely to keep the data they have—and collect more of it.
Step three
Capitalize on the trust you’ve earned from customers and the trust you have in their data to transform your business models.
Customers
How to win in the trust economy
“Customers expect personalization, underpinned by data. However, there remains a question as to how much information customers will share, given the erosion of trust.”
CEO
| Banking
Australia

The ways in which organizations transparently share data about their offerings, take responsibility for the personal data they collect, and use data to their customers’ benefit determine their market position. The trust customers once gave, almost blindly, to brands and institutions has been slipping away for some time. They now demand something else: transparency of data associated with products and services and, in the case of personal data, assurances that it’s used in a fair manner and kept safe.

With data breaches making headlines monthly, if not weekly, data priva