AI

IBM data research pioneer Charu Aggarwal wins 2021 “IT Nobel”

IBM's Charu Aggarwal earns the 2021 IEEE W. Wallace McDowell Award in recognition of his extensive body of work, particularly in the areas of high-dimensional data analysis, data stream research and data privacy techniques. The W. Wallace McDowell Award, referred to as the "IT Nobel," is named after the former director of engineering at IBM during the development of the pioneering IBM 701 electronic data processing machine in the early 1950s.

STEM

Going beyond Women’s History Month: Celebrating & empowering women scientists

In order to create a culture and climate within and outside of IBM Research that embraces, supports, and enables successful careers in STEM, we need to work together every day to hire, empower, and grow women in STEM fields.

AI

AI helps explain your microbiome

Newly published research describes an Explainable AI to help understand the link between skin microbiome composition and personal wellbeing.

IBM data research pioneer Charu Aggarwal wins 2021 “IT Nobel”

IBM's Charu Aggarwal earns the 2021 IEEE W. Wallace McDowell Award in recognition of his extensive body of work, particularly in the areas of high-dimensional data analysis, data stream research and data privacy techniques. The W. Wallace McDowell Award, referred to as the "IT Nobel," is named after the former director of engineering at IBM during the development of the pioneering IBM 701 electronic data processing machine in the early 1950s.

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Going beyond Women’s History Month: Celebrating & empowering women scientists

In order to create a culture and climate within and outside of IBM Research that embraces, supports, and enables successful careers in STEM, we need to work together every day to hire, empower, and grow women in STEM fields.

Continue reading

AI helps explain your microbiome

Newly published research describes an Explainable AI to help understand the link between skin microbiome composition and personal wellbeing.

Continue reading

Celebrating Black talent at IBM Quantum

In recognition of Black History Month, we spoke with a few of our growing cohort of Black IBM Quantum team members working to build the future of quantum computing. The four featured here perform indispensable roles at each level of the quantum stack, from researching quantum algorithms and their potential applications to building a global quantum ecosystem. We hope you'll follow along and celebrate their accomplishments with us today and into the future.

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Exploring quantum spin liquids as a reservoir for atomic-scale electronics

In “Probing resonating valence bond states in artificial quantum magnets,” we show that quantum spin liquids can be built and probed with atomic precision.

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The IBM-HBCU Quantum Center grows rapidly in size and scope

The IBM-HBCU Quantum Center has announced a slate of new members for the Center, with 10 historically Black colleges and universities joining the Center’s 13 founding institutions.

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Introducing the AI chip leading the world in precision scaling

We’ve made strides in delivering the next-gen AI computational systems with cutting-edge performance and unparalleled energy efficiency.

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Atomic force microscopy helps clear the haze surrounding Saturn’s moon Titan

We have unveiled in the laboratory new details on how the famous Titan haze may have formed and what its chemical make-up looks like. Our findings in the latest issue of the Astrophysical Journal detail how we've resolved molecules of different sizes, giving snapshots of the different stages through which molecules grow to build up the haze.

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How to measure and reset a qubit in the middle of a circuit execution

IBM Quantum systems can now measure and reset a qubit in the middle of a circuit execution.

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IBM’s AI goes multilingual — with single language training

At AAAI, our team presented two new multilingual research techniques that enable AI to understand different languages while only trained on one.

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Silicon waveguides move us closer to faster computers that use light

Our Zurich-based team of researchers has just managed to efficiently guide visible light through a silicon wire – an important milestone towards faster, more efficient integrated circuits. Our low-loss silicon waveguide could enable new photonic chip designs for applications that rely on visible light, and could lead to more efficient lasers and modulators used in telecoms.

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IBM boosts material discovery to make gadgets more sustainable

PAGs play a vital role in the manufacturing of computer chips. They are also one of several classes of chemical compounds that have recently come under enhanced scrutiny from environmental regulators. Researchers have been racing to create more sustainable ones – but the traditional process of discovering new materials is too slow, too costly, and too risky. So IBM researchers have turned to AI for help – and created new PAGs much, much faster, paving the way to the era of Accelerated Discovery.

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