It might be rocket science. And it’s within reach.

Lisa Seacat DeLuca is an executive, a Distinguished Engineer and IBM’s most prolific female inventor, holding close to 400 patents. She is also an anomaly.

The preponderance of standouts in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) are men. That isn’t because the jobs aren’t there. Jobs in all areas of STEM are booming, and companies are actively working to create a better diversity balance in the workforce. But many of the girls with the potential to be the next Lisa Seacat DeLuca look around and don’t see themselves reflected in the tech world.

“Only 26 percent of technology professionals are female, and only 10 percent of executives in tech are women,” says DeLuca. “We need to show girls — and boys — that the stereotypes we hold about who can succeed in technology are wrong.”

The #SheCanSTEM campaign includes videos of STEM influencers interviewed by middle-school girls. In this 15-second spot, Karri asks DeLuca about her work at IBM.

Drive the conversation with #SheCanSTEM

IBM has joined the Ad Council and four other major tech companies working to bring more girls into STEM by showcasing the achievements of role models like DeLuca.

Industry research shows that middle-school age girls begin to lose interest in STEM subjects. If we want girls to succeed in STEM, we have to show them it’s possible. The “She Can STEM” campaign seeks to reinforce the idea that STEM is, in fact, cool, exciting, creative and inspiring.

26%

of technology professionals are female

10%

of executives in Silicon Valley are women

If you can’t see it, you can’t be it

To encourage girls to picture themselves as technology leaders, DeLuca and other women in STEM are posting pictures of themselves during their early years, across social media, and encouraging others to do the same.

“As a parent, I think it’s important for both girls and boys to see female leaders,” said DeLuca. “We need to encourage children to stay curious, to try things that interest them, and to keep trying even if they’re not any good at it at first. Sometimes girls feel so much pressure to be the best that they don’t allow themselves to fail. We have to give ourselves the freedom to fail in order to learn new things.”

Lisa's picture

Lisa Seacat DeLuca at age 12

P-TECH schools are a role model for STEM career prep

ShuDon Brown was one of the ambitious students who graduated with an associate degree from the Bedford–Stuyvesant Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in Crown Heights, Brooklyn at just 16.

 

With the help of her very proud mom, ShuDon is realizing her dream to go to school at William Peace University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Learn more about the P-TECH school model and find a school in your area at ptech.org →

Take the next step

When more girls go into STEM, we all benefit. IBM has a wealth of resources aimed at turning that goal into a reality.

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P-TECH schools are a role model for STEM career prep

ShuDon Brown was one of the ambitious students who graduated with an associate degree from the Bedford–Stuyvesant Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in Crown Heights, Brooklyn at just 16.

 
 

With the help of her very proud mom, ShuDon is realizing her dream to go to school at William Peace University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Learn more about the P-TECH school model and find a school in your area at ptech.org →