P-TECH celebrates its 2018 graduates

By this summer, more than 150 students will have graduated from IBM P-TECH schools in four U.S. cities. The students, who graduate with both their high school diplomas and their associate degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), attended Pathways in Technology Early College High School in Brooklyn, N.Y.; Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy in Chicago; Norwalk Early College Academy (NECA) in Norwalk, Conn.; and Excelsior Academy in Newburgh, N.Y.

Many of the scholars who participated in P-TECH, a grade 9-to-14 education model pioneered by IBM in partnership with educators, have completed the six-year program early — some in under four years — and many will be the first in their family to earn a college degree.

Babatunde Anjorin, 18, Newburgh

Picture of Babatunde Anjorin

Babatunde Anjorin, 18, Newburgh

Babatunde completed a summer internship with IBM’s Server Support Team and plans to go into cyber security

Carl Barton, 18, Brooklyn

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Carl Barton, 18, Brooklyn

Carl, who received awards for his skills in math and science, would one day like to build his own car

Brianna Blagrove, 18, Brooklyn

Picture of Brianna

Brianna Blagrove, 18, Brooklyn

Brianna is a member of the National Honor Society and is headed to Penn State to study biochemistry

Tanyia Bynum, 17, Norwalk

Picture of Tanyia

Tanyia Bynum, 17, Norwalk

Tanyia gained communication and collaboration skills through NECA that gave her the confidence to succeed

Katrell Clay, 17, Norwalk

Picture of Katrell

Katrell Clay, 17, Norwalk

Katrell is the first NECA captain of a sports team at his high school and will pursue an engineering degree

Sandy Hernandez, 18, Chicago

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Sandy Hernandez, 18, Chicago

Sandy didn’t start out as a big fan of coding, but now appreciates the skills she’s acquired at Goode

Nalo Herrera, 17, Brooklyn

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Nalo Herrera, 17, Brooklyn

Nalo plans to become a doctor after completing his undergraduate studies at Hunter College in New York City

Jevon Hill, 18, Chicago

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Jevon Hill, 18, Chicago

Jevon earned multiple IT certifications and created a web-based data collection app while in the program

Amaya Locke, 17, Brooklyn

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Amaya Locke, 17, Brooklyn

Amaya participated in the Enza Hackathon and plans a career inspiring girls to break barriers in the STEM fields

Azariah McLymore, 18, Newburgh

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Azariah McLymore, 18, Newburgh

Azariah's focus on creating positive social change led her to create the McLymore Foundation to “empower people to rise above expectation”

Amelia Navarro, 17, Norwalk

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Amelia Navarro, 17, Norwalk

Amelia is proud to be a Hispanic woman in STEM, and will be the first in her family to graduate from college

Aboya Omot, 18, Newburgh

Picture of Aboya

Aboya Omot, 18, Newburgh

Aboya, an ambitious scholar-athlete, was captain of her varsity basketball team and earned a college GPA of 3.8

Maribel Ramos, 17, Newburgh

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Maribel Ramos, 17, Newburgh

Maribel has taught coding both at home and in Ecuador, and says her IBM mentor helped her gain the confidence to succeed

Daleah Sampler, 18, Chicago

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Daleah Sampler, 18, Chicago

Daleah credits her family, faith and mentors for instilling within her the importance of persistence

Christopher Samuel, 18, Brooklyn

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Christopher Samuel, 18, Brooklyn

Christopher is on track to complete both his high school and college requirements in just four years

Brendin Skakel, 17, Newburgh

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Brendin Skakel, 17, Newburgh

Brendin co-founded the Excelsior Robotics Club and has taught robotics to underprivileged youth in Ecuador

Ryan Stelly, 17, Norwalk

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Ryan Stelly, 17, Norwalk

Ryan is finishing first in his class while graduating summa cum laude from Norwalk Community College

Aasim Vhora, 17, Norwalk

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Aasim Vhora, 17, Norwalk

Aasim will work for IBM as a cloud systems analyst while studying computer science at the University of Connecticut

Kyra Washington, 18, Chicago

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Kyra Washington, 18, Chicago

Kyra will attend Bradley University, where she plans to double major in pre-med and journalism

Diamond Webb, 17, Chicago

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Diamond Webb, 17, Chicago

Diamond is committed to proving that young girls of color can succeed in the STEM fields

What is P-TECH?

Pathways in Technology Early College High Schools (P-TECH) are innovative public schools spanning grades 9 to 14 that bring together the best elements of high school, college and career.

P-TECH will grow from 1 school
in 2011 to more than 100 schools in 2018

Within six years, students graduate with a no-cost associate degree in applied science, engineering, computers or other competitive STEM disciplines, along with the skills and knowledge they need to continue their studies or step easily into high-growth, “new collar” jobs. These are positions in some of the nation’s fastest-growing industries where what matters most is having in-demand skills.

Innovation grows from partnerships

This new education model was co-developed by IBM working together with educators, policymakers and elected officials. P-TECH is designed to be both widely replicable and sustainable, as part of a national effort to reform career and technical education.

P-TECH students are supported
by more than 400 business partners

Industry partners help ensure that students graduate career-ready, providing mentoring, site visits and paid internships. The schools map skills that employers value into the curriculum, preparing P-TECH graduates to enter the workforce after graduation.

P-TECH scholars plan to keep learning

Some of the P-TECH graduates will move on to “new collar” jobs, ranging from associate analyst to digital design developer.

On-time graduation from Brooklyn
P-TECH is 4x the national average

Others plan to pursue their bachelor’s degrees, and some will do both — maintaining jobs that use the skills they gained in the program while furthering their education.

Learn more about P-TECH

IBM and other stakeholders created a detailed playbook for how this model can be replicated elsewhere. The website offers tools and case studies to help school districts, higher education institutions and businesses establish P-TECH schools by replicating IBM’s groundbreaking public-private partnership education model.

Picture of Babatunde

Babatunde Anjorin, 18

Babatunde is a scholar athlete who plays varsity football and runs track. He is proud to have completed a summer internship with IBM's Server Support Team. Babatunde plans to continue his degree path in cyber security, and to finish his bachelor’s degree two years early at SUNY Polytechnic, as his A.A.S. credits will be applied toward his next degree.

Picture of Carl

Carl Barton, 18

Carl has a passion for engineering technology. At P-TECH, he joined the robotics team and received Best in Science and Best in Math awards. His favorite memory from his internship at IBM was when he and his mentor tested IBM Watson’s limitations by running multiple data sheets using Watson Analytics. He plans to earn a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, and would one day like to build his own automobile.

Picture of Brianna

Brianna Blagrove, 18

Brianna has learned that with focus and determination you can alter your future. She is set to finish the P-TECH program early, and is also a member of the National Honor Society. During her summer internship with IBM, Brianna developed her programming skills by creating web pages and learning how to operate a Slackbot. One day, Brianna would like to work for a company that makes pharmaceutical products — but first, she plans to study biochemistry at Penn State.

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Tanyia Bynum, 17

Tanyia interned with IBM’s Global Technology Services unit during the summer of 2017, using Watson data analytics to analyze customer data. Tanyia initially struggled with her first college courses, but with the communication and collaboration skills she learned through NECA, she gradually gained the confidence to succeed. Tanyia plans to advance her education and career simultaneously, and would like to pursue a career at IBM.

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Katrell Clay, 17

Katrell loves to take on new challenges. He is the first NECA captain of a sports team at his high school, and will be part of NECA’s very first graduating class. Katrell is also balancing college coursework and working part-time as an IBM intern. Over the summer of 2017, he interned in the IBM Global Technology Services business unit, and was hired as an IBM Corporate Citizenship intern in fall 2017. Katrell will attend the University of Connecticut to pursue a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

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Sandy Hernandez, 18

Sandy initially wasn’t a big fan of programming or coding — but today, she will tell you that she truly appreciates the technical skills she’s acquired through her work at Goode. Sandy believes her diverse skill set will prove to be an asset while she’s pursuing bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Chicago’s Saint Xavier University this fall.

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Nalo Herrera, 17

Nalo has learned that if you want something in life, sometimes you have to leave your comfort zone. Recently, through a unique opportunity arranged by IBM, Nalo took part in an NYC “48-in-48” event where he worked with a team of IBMers to create a website for a nonprofit organization. While he is fascinated by computer science, Nalo is most passionate about medicine; he plans to become a doctor after completing his undergraduate studies at Hunter College in New York City.

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Jevon Hill, 18

Jevon will become the second member of his family to obtain his A.A.S. from Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy. Jevon was proud to demonstrate the technical skills he acquired as a Goode student during a paid IBM summer internship where he created a web-based application to collect data for generating a customer support plan. Jevon has earned multiple IT certifications and is looking forward to forging his career path following graduation.

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Amaya Locke, 17

Amaya dreams of helping young girls gain opportunities in STEM. At P-TECH, she has learned many valuable skills including effective time management. Some of her favorite memories at P-TECH include participating in the Enza Hackathon and getting inducted into the National Honor Society. She plans to travel the world while inspiring girls to break barriers in the STEM fields.

Picture of Azariah

Azariah McLymore, 18

Azariah is on the four-year graduation track, and will graduate with her high school diploma and A.A.S. in cyber security this year. Azariah's drive to work for positive social change in her community led her to create the McLymore Foundation, designed to “empower people to rise above expectation.” Following graduation, Azariah will pursue a bachelor’s degree in history, and aspires to become an attorney.

Picture of Amelia

Amelia Navarro, 17

Amelia will be the first in her family to graduate from college, and is thrilled to be fulfilling her family’s dream. Amelia says that her NECA experience has taught her how to take on challenges. Her favorite experience was an internship with IBM Watson Research. Amelia is proud to be a Hispanic woman in STEM, and looks forward to heading to the University of Connecticut to study the sciences.

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Aboya Omot, 18

Aboya is an ambitious scholar-athlete who is graduating early. She has many achievements to be proud of, including being captain of her varsity basketball team, graduating 13th out of a district-wide senior class of 724 students, and earning a college GPA of 3.8. Excelsior offered Aboya unique opportunities that have helped her enhance her natural leadership skills. As a first-generation college graduate, she hopes to set a good example for her younger siblings. In the fall, she will attend Georgia Tech, majoring in biomedical engineering.

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Maribel Ramos, 17

Maribel will be the first in her family to pursue a bachelor’s degree. During her time at Excelsior, Maribel has taught coding — internationally while volunteering in Ecuador with Global to Local, and locally at her community recreation center. Maribel also designed and facilitated a computer science program that teaches children in grades 3-8 the basics of robotics and computer programming. Maribel credits her IBM mentor for allowing her to step out of her comfort zone and gain confidence in herself. She plans to pursue a degree in marketing with a minor in international business from SUNY Oswego.

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Daleah Sampler, 18

Daleah will complete her A.A.S. in web development this spring, and will graduate as class valedictorian. Daleah credits her family, faith and mentors for instilling within her the importance of persistence. And while she’s learned skills such as HTML, CSS, JavaScript and Python programming during her time at Goode, Daleah’s long-term aspiration is to become an athletic trainer in the NBA. In the interim, she intends to leverage the skills she’s acquired through her degree pathway to enter the world of work.

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Christopher Samuel, 18

Christopher will graduate from P-TECH early. He is on track to complete both his high school and college requirements within just four years — an accomplishment he shares with his brother, P-TECH ’16 alum David Samuel. Christopher, who was recently inducted into the National Society of High School Scholars, notes that time management is key. Following graduation, Christopher would like to secure a full-time position at IBM.

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Brendin Skakel, 17

Brendin is a student with drive who loves to give back. He recently volunteered abroad in Ecuador, where he taught robotics to underprivileged youth. In addition, Brendin co-founded the Excelsior Robotics Club, which reached the regional semifinals in its first year. Brendin will graduate two years early with an A.A.S. in cyber security, and will go on to study forensics in the honors program at John Jay College in New York City.

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Ryan Stelly, 17

Ryan is graduating in just four years, and believes that NECA has helped him reach new heights he once thought impossible. Not only has Ryan participated in Norwalk High School’s music department for all four years, he is also finishing first in his class while graduating summa cum laude from Norwalk Community College. As an IBM intern, Ryan worked on the Business Development and Strategic Partnerships team. He will carry this momentum forward into Lehigh University, where he plans to study engineering.

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Aasim Vhora, 17

Aasim proudly identifies as an Indian American, and is the second person from his family to attend college in the United States. Aasim recalls his summer internship with IBM’s Digital Business Group as being “life changing.” Aasmin has accepted an offer to work for IBM as a cloud systems analyst while studying computer science at the University of Connecticut.

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Kyra Washington, 18

Kyra was a member of the volleyball, swimming and track teams at Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy, while also managing her rigorous college coursework. She will attend Bradley University this fall, where she plans to double major in pre-med and journalism. Kyra thanks her family for reaffirming that she really can do anything her heart desires.

Picture of Diamond Webb

Diamond Webb, 17

Diamond, who calls Chicago’s Englewood community home, is committed to changing the narrative and proving that young girls of color can succeed in the STEM fields. She will obtain her A.A.S. in computer science this year, and plans to attend the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the fall.