Table of contents

Using project-lib for Python (deprecated)

The project-lib library for Python contains a set of functions that help you to interact with Watson Studio projects and project assets. You can think of the library as a programmatical interface to a project. Using the project-lib library, you can access project metadata and assets, including files and connections. The library also contains functions that simplify fetching files associated with the project.

The project-lib library for Python is deprecated and has been replaced by the ibm-watson-studio-lib library for Python. Although you can still use project-lib, you should start using ibm-watson-studio-lib in your notebooks. See ibm-watson-studio-lib for Python.

Note:

  • The project-lib functions do not encode or decode data when saving data to or getting data from a file.
  • The project-lib functions can’t be used to access folder assets (files on a path in Cloud Object Storage).

The project-lib functions

The instantiated project object that is created after you have imported the project-lib library exposes a set of functions that are grouped in the following way:

Fetch project information

You can use the following functions to fetch project-related information programmatically:

  • get_name()

    This function returns the name of the project.

  • get_description()

    This function returns the description of the project.

  • get_metadata()

    This function returns the project metadata.

  • get_files()

    This function returns the list of the files in your project. Each element in the returned list contains the ID and the name of the file. The list of returned files is not sorted by any criterion and can change when you call the function again.

  • get_assets()

    This function returns a list of all project assets. You can pass the optional parameter asset_type to the function get_assets which allows you to filter assets by type. The accepted values for this parameter are data_asset, connection and asset. The value asset returns all of the assets in your project. For example, to get only the data assets, use the function get_assets("data_asset").

  • get_connections()

    This function returns a list of the connections you have in your project. Each element in the returned list contains the ID and the name of the connection.

Fetch files

You can use the following function to fetch files associated with your project.

  • get_file(file_name) where file_name is the name of the file you want to fetch.

    This function fetches a file into the memory of the running kernel. The function returns a byte buffer which can be used to bind into kernel-specific data structures, for example, a pandas DataFrame. This method of fetching files is not recommended for very large files.

    The following example shows you how to fetch a file and read the data into a pandas DataFrame:

    # Import the lib
    from project_lib import Project
    project = Project.access()
    
    # Fetch the file
    my_file = project.get_file("myFile.csv")
    
    # Read the CSV data file into a pandas DataFrame
    my_file.seek(0)
    import pandas as pd
    pd.read_csv(my_file, nrows=10)
    

Save data

You can use the following function to save data to a file associated with your project. This function does multiple things. Firstly, it puts the data into a file and then it adds this data as a data asset to your project so you can see the data that you saved as a file in the data assets list in your project.

  • save_data(file_name, data, set_project_asset=True, overwrite=False)

    The function takes the following parameters:

    • file_name: the name of the created file.
    • data: the data to upload. This can be any object of type file-like-object, for example, byte buffers or string buffers.
    • set_project_asset[optional]: adds the file to the project as a data asset after the data was successfully uploaded to the file. It takes a boolean value and the value true is set by default.
    • overwrite[optional]: overwrites the file if the file already exists. By default it is set to false.

    Here is an example, which shows you how you can save data to a file:

    # Import the lib
    from project_lib import Project
    project = Project.access()
        
    # let's assume you have the pandas DataFrame  pandas_df which contains the data
    # you want to save as a csv file
    project.save_data("file_name.csv", pandas_df.to_csv(index=False))
    
    # the function returns a dict which contains the asset_id and file_name
    # upon successful saving of the data
    

Read data from a connection

You can use the following function to get the metadata (credentials) of a given connection.

  • get_connection: the function takes as input the ID of the connection or the name of the connection. You can get these values by using the get_assets() function which returns the id, name and type of all the assets listed in project.

    The function get_connection returns the connection credentials which you can use to fetch data from the connection data source.

    Here is an example, which shows you how you can fetch the credentials of a connection by using the get_connection function:

    
    # Import the lib
    from project_lib import Project
         project = Project.access()
    
    conn_creds = project.get_connection(name="<ConnectionName>")
    

    If your connection is a connection to dashDB for example, you can fetch your data by running the following code:

    from pyspark.sql import SparkSession
    spark = SparkSession.builder.getOrCreate()
    
    host_url = "jdbc:db2://{}:{}/{}".format(conn_creds["host"], "50000", conn_creds["database"])
    data_df = spark.read.jdbc(host_url, table="<TableName>", properties={"user": conn_creds["username"], "password": conn_creds["password"]})
    data_df.show()
    

Fetch connected data

You can use the following function to fetch the credentials of connected data. The function returns a dictionary that contains the connection credentials in addition to a datapath attribute that points to specific data in that connection, for example, a table in a dashDB instance or a database in a Cloudant instance.

  • get_connected_data: this function takes as input the ID of the connected data or the name of the connected data. You can get these values by using the get_assets() function which returns the id, name and type of all the assets listed in project.

    Here is an example, which shows you how to fetch the credentials of connected data in a dashDB instance by using the get_connected_data function:

    # Import the lib
    from project_lib import Project
    project = Project.access()
    
    creds = project.get_connected_data(name="<ConnectedDataName>")
    # creds is a dictionary that has the connection credentials in addition to
    # a datapath that references a specific table in the database, for example: 
    # creds: {'database': 'DB_NAME',
    # 'datapath': '/DASHDB/SAMPLE_TABLE',
    # 'host': 'hostname',
    # 'password': 'XXXX',
    # 'sg_service_url': 'https://sgmanager.ng.bluemix.net',
    # 'username': 'XXXX'} 
    

Learn more

See a demo of these functions in a blog post.