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How to interpret the value of ICCMailFlags

Technical Blog Post


Abstract

How to interpret the value of ICCMailFlags

Body

In the IBM Content Collector (ICC) documentation, it explains that ICCMailFlags property is a bit-based combination of individual email properties. 

Documentation

http://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SSAE9L_4.0.0/com.ibm.content.collector.doc/metadata_and_lists/r_afu_system_metadata_email.html

  • Bit 0 (value 1) <Email, Might Have Attachment>
    Bit 1 (value 2) <Email, Has Attachment>
  • Bit 2 (value 4) <Email, Is Encrypted>
  • Bit 3 (value 8) <Email, Is Signed>
  • Bit 4 (value 16) <Email, Is under IRM>
  • Bit 5 (value 32) <Email, Is Decrypted>
  • Bit 6 (value 64) <Email, Is Private>

Additional bits are reserved for future use and to store the version of the MailFlags property.

For example, the value for a signed email document with attachments is -2147483638 (hexadecimal value 0x8000000A). The value for a standard email document without attachments is -2147483648 (hexadecimal value 0x00000000).

What exactly does it mean?

For example, I run this database query in P8 and obtain the following results:

Query:

SELECT ICCMailFlags, count(*) FROM P8DB2."DOCVERSION" where and object_class_id = (select object_id from P8DB2USR.classdefinition where symbolic_name = 'ICCMail3') group by ICCMailFlags

Results:

ICCMailFlags

Count

-2147483648

1052675

-2147483646

127600

-2147483644

3071

-2147483642

37501

-2147483640

35

-2147483638

2576

-2147483584

3472

-2147483582

467

-2147483580

80

-2147483578

2317


How should I interpret these values? 

  • To see what the value of ICCMailFlags mean, first convert the value into a binary number. 
  • On Windows, you can do that with Calculator.
    • In calculator, go to View Programmer
    • Select Dec mode and Dword mode. 
    • Enter the ICCMailFlags value and take note of the binary number converted. 
    • For example, I enter -2147483648 and the binary value recorded is 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000. 
      image
  • Bit 0 starts with the right-most value. Followed by Bit 1 to the left and so on and so forth. 

Examples

  1. Decimal value: -2147483646
    Binary value: 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010
    imageBit 1 is set. 
    According to the documentation, when bit 1 is set, it means the email has attachments. 
     
  2. Decimal value: -2147483642
    Binary value:1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0110
    image
    Bit 1 and 2 are both set. 
    It means the email has attachments and email is encrypted. 

To complete the analysis on the above example, 

ICCMailFlags

Count

Binary value of ICCMailFlags What it means

-2147483648

1052675

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 Email does not have any attachment, is not encrypted, is not signed.

-2147483646

127600

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0010 Email has attachment(s).

-2147483644

3071

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0100 Email is encrypted.

-2147483642

37501

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0110 Email is encrypted and has attachment(s).

-2147483640

35

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1000 Email is signed.

-2147483638

2576

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1010 Email is signed and has attachment(s).

-2147483584

3472

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0100 0000 Email is private.

-2147483582

467

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0100 0010 Email is private and has attachment(s).

-2147483580

80

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0100 0100 Email is private and is encrypted.

-2147483578

2317

1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1000 0110 Email is private, is encrypted, and has attachment(s).

 

The count column gives the total number for that type of emails in your repository.

 

 

[{"Business Unit":{"code":"BU029","label":"Data and AI"}, "Product":{"code":"SSAE9L","label":"Content Collector"},"Component":"","Platform":[{"code":"PF025","label":"Platform Independent"}],"Version":"","Edition":""}]

UID

ibm11138930