IBM Support

Collect IBM MQ MustGather data to solve hang and high CPU problems on Linux, UNIX, Windows and IBM i

Troubleshooting


Problem

IBM MQ is performing poorly, hanging or using excessively high CPU usage, and you need to collect MustGather data to find a solution.

Environment

These instructions apply only to IBM MQ V9.0 and V8.0, and WebSphere MQ V7.5, V7.1, V7.0 and V6.0 on AIX, HP-UX, Linux, Solaris and Windows, and to IBM MQ V9.0 and V8.0, and WebSphere MQ V7.1, V7.0 and V6.0 on IBM i. Refer to the IBM MQ Read First page for instructions on other operating systems:

Resolving The Problem

Please answer these questions about the problem and then follow the steps below:

  • What performance problem or hang did you observe on the system?
  • What time did the problem start and when did it stop?
  • Which processes were involved in the performance problem or hang?
  • Were there any recent changes to the system or to your applications before the problem?


Step 1: Generate Data


It is essential to gather information from the system when the performance problem or hang is happening in order to identify the cause:




  1. Generate stack dumps and other debugging data from the queue managers and applications showing the problem:

    Generating debugging data from managed file transfer processes on Linux, UNIX, Windows and IBM i

    Generate three javacores from the hanging managed file transfer process, delaying approximately one minute between each one. Replace AGENTNAME and LOGGERNAME with the name of the managed file transfer agent or logger that is hanging, and COORDQMNAME with the name of the coordination queue manager:



    1. If you are running MQ V7.5 or later, you can generate debugging data from managed file transfer agents and loggers very easily:

      V7.5 and later: Generating three agent javacores on Linux, UNIX and Windows


      fteSetAgentTraceLevel -jc AGENTNAME
      ...
      fteSetAgentTraceLevel -jc AGENTNAME
      ...
      fteSetAgentTraceLevel -jc AGENTNAME


      V7.5 and later: Generating three logger javacores on Linux, UNIX and Windows


      fteSetLoggerTraceLevel -jc LOGGERNAME
      ...
      fteSetLoggerTraceLevel -jc LOGGERNAME
      ...
      fteSetLoggerTraceLevel -jc LOGGERNAME


      The java cores generated by this method are stored in the file transfer data directory, based on the coordination queue manager name and the agent name. For example:

      V7.5 Javacore location on Linux and UNIX


      /var/mqm/mqft/logs/COORDQMNAME/loggers/LOGGERNAME
      /var/mqm/mqft/logs/COORDQMNAME/agents/AGENTNAME

      V7.5 Javacore location on Windows (may vary)


      C:\Program Files (x86)\IBM\WebSphere MQ\mqft\logs\COORDQMNAME\agents\AGENTNAME
      C:\Program Files (x86)\IBM\WebSphere MQ\mqft\logs\COORDQMNAME\loggers\LOGGERNAME



    2. If you are running WebSphere MQ File Transfer Edition V7.0, you must configure the agent in advance in order to generate javacores. This method of triggering javacores is available in later versions, but is now redundant.



    3. Stop the agent and edit its agent.properties file to include the javaCoreTriggerFile property, which should name a file of your choosing. On Windows systems, you must use double blackslashes as path separators. For example:

      Setting the javaCoreTriggerFile property in agent.properties on Linux, UNIX and IBM i


      javaCoreTriggerFile=/tmp/javatrigger.txt

      Setting the javaCoreTriggerFile property in agent.properties on Windows


      javaCoreTriggerFile=C:\\TEMP\\JAVATRIGGER.TXT



    4. Restart the agent to pick up the new property. Whenever the trigger file is altered, the agent will generate a javacore. For example:

      Generating three agent javacores on Linux and UNIX


      sh> touch /tmp/javatrigger.txt
          ...
      sh> touch /tmp/javatrigger.txt
          ...
      sh> touch /tmp/javatrigger.txt

      Generating three agent javacores on Windows


      C:\> ECHO "NOW" > C:\TEMP\JAVATRIGGER.TXT
           ...
      C:\> ECHO "NOW" > C:\TEMP\JAVATRIGGER.TXT
           ...
      C:\> ECHO "NOW" > C:\TEMP\JAVATRIGGER.TXT

      Generating three agent javacores in the IBM i Qshell


      ===> touch /tmp/javatrigger.txt
           ...
      ===> touch /tmp/javatrigger.txt
           ...
      ===> touch /tmp/javatrigger.txt



    5. Delete the trigger file when done. You may remove the javaCoreTriggerFile property the next time you restart the agent, or leave it in place to gather more javacores in the future.

      Deleting the trigger file on Linux and UNIX


      sh> rm /tmp/javatrigger.txt

      Deleting the trigger file on Windows


      C:\> DEL C:\TEMP\JAVATRIGGER.TXT

      Deleting the trigger file in the IBM i Qshell


      ===> rm /tmp/javatrigger.txt



    6. The javacores generated by this procedure will be written to the same agent directories shown in the previous step for V7.5 and to the following directories for V7.0:

      V7.0 Javacore location on Linux and UNIX


      /var/mqm/config/logs/COORDQMNAME/agents/AGENTNAME

      V7.0 Javacore location on Windows (may vary)


      C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\IBM\WMQFTE\config\logs\COORDQMNAME\agents\AGENTNAME

      V7.0 Javacore location on IBM i


      /QIBM/UserData/WMQFTE/V7/config/COORDQMNAME/agents/AGENTNAME



    7. For all other managed file transfer commands, follow these instructions to generate three javacores from the process. The javacores or thead dumps in this case are typically written to the working directory of the command:



    8. On AIX, HP-UX, Linux and Solaris, list the Java™ virtual machines using ps and find the one running the hanging managed file transfer command. Then send SIGQUIT to that process identifier (PID) to generate a javacore or thread dump. Note that the "kill -QUIT" command does not terminate Java virtual machines on Linux and UNIX but instead makes them create a javacore or thread dump. For example:

      Generating javacores from a managed file transfer command on AIX, HP-UX, Linux and Solaris


      sh> ps -ef | egrep 'PID|StartAgent'
        UID   PID  PPID   C STIME   TTY           TIME CMD
       7001 37789     1   0 Sun03PM ??         3:07.35 java ... com.ibm.wmqfte.api.StartAgent AGENT1
       7001 69177 64373   0  2:35PM ttys003    0:00.00 egrep PID|StartAgent
      sh> kill -QUIT 37789
          ...
      sh> kill -QUIT 37789
          ...
      sh> kill -QUIT 37789



    9. On Windows, start the managed file transfer command from the Windows command prompt. Be sure to add the -F option to the fteStartAgent, fteStartLogger, and fteStartDatabaseLogger commands so that will run in the foreground and not in the background or as a Windows service. Then type the Ctrl+Break keyboard sequence to generate a javacore from the process. For example:

      Generating javacores from a managed file transfer process on Windows


      C:\> fteStartLogger -F LOGGER1
      ...
      Ctrl+Break
      ...
      Ctrl+Break
      ...
      Ctrl+Break



    10. On IBM i, list the Java Virtual Machine jobs in the system using WRKJVMJOB option 7 to find the one running the hanging managed file transfer command. Then press F3 to exit and use the job Number, User and Job name to generate a Java thread dump from the job. For example:

      Generating javacores from a managed file transfer process using the IBM i Command Line


      ===> WRKJVMJOB

      Opt  Job Name    User        Number  Function          Status
           QJVACMDSRV  QMQM        136365  PGM-StartAgent     THDW
           QYPSJSVR    QYPSJSVR    136415  PGM-jvmStartPa     SIGW

      Use option 7 to find the right job and F3 to return to the Command Line

      ===> GENJVMDMP JOB(136365/QMQM/QJVACMDSRV) TYPE(*JAVA)


    Generating debugging data from processes on Linux and UNIX


    1. Download the IBM stackit and sigdump scripts. On HP-UX and Linux systems you must install the GNU debugger (GDB, called WDB on HP-UX), even if temporarily, for stackit to work:



    2. Run the stackit script three times against the affected MQ queue managers and applications, with a delay of a minute or less between each run:

      Running stackit against queue managers QMA and QMB and against and the program myapp


      sh> stackit -m QMA -m QMB -n myapp -f /var/mqm/errors/stackit-1.txt
      sh> sleep 30
      sh> stackit -m QMA -m QMB -n myapp -f /var/mqm/errors/stackit-2.txt
      sh> sleep 30
      sh> stackit -m QMA -m QMB -n myapp -f /var/mqm/errors/stackit-3.txt


    3. Run the sigdump script once against the affected MQ queue managers. The sigdump script will cause each queue manager to generate diagnostic FFST files:

      Runnning sigdump against queue managers QMA and QMB


      sh> sigdump -m QMA -m QMB

    Generating debugging data from processes on Windows


    1. Download the following debugging utilities from Microsoft if you do not have them on your system:



    2. Display the list of processes:

      Displaying processes on Windows


      C:\> tasklist -v


    3. Display additional information about each process:

      Displaying process statistics on Windows


      C:\> pslist -x


    4. Display information about MQ processes and any affected applications by passing the first few characters of each process name to the handle program, for example:

      Displaying process handles on Windows


      C:\> handle -a -p amq
      C:\> handle -a -p runmq
      C:\> handle -a -p myapp


    5. Gather data from hangs (or even crashes) of MQ processes and any affected applications, for example:

      Gathering hang and crash information on Windows


      C:\> adplus -hang -pn amqzxma0.exe
      C:\> adplus -hang -pn amqzlaa0.exe
      C:\> adplus -crash -pn runmqchi.exe


    6. Use the Microsoft Process Monitor tool to provide real-time stack data, loaded modules, environment information, files accessed, libr/aries used, registry keys accessed, and more information. Please note that this tool can be very CPU intensive, even with filtering options set. Refer to the section "Scripting Process Monitor" in the included procmon.chm help file for information on using it in a script or batch file.

    Generating debugging data from processes on IBM i


    1. Download and run the IBM MQSTACK tool as described here. MQSTACK will show the status of all threads for all queue manager processes, however it does not show information about non-MQ processes:



    2. For processes which are not part of the queue manager, such as application programs, run the SERVICEDOCS utility as described below. SERVICEDOCS will show the stack for the main thread of every process on the system:


  2. Generate an MQ trace while the problem is happening. Please stop the trace after a short period of time (e.g. a minute or less) to avoid worsening the system performance:



  3. If the hang or high CPU usage is happening inside WebSphere Application Server, please complete the WebSphere Application Server MustGather instructions for your platform:



  4. On Linux and UNIX systems, save the output from the mqconfig command. If you are running IBM MQ V9.0 or V8.0, or WebSphere MQ V7.5.0.2 or later, or V7.1.0.3 or later, the mqconfig command is already available as part of the MQ server installation.



Step 2: Collect Data


  1. Place the debug files from Step 1, and on Linux and UNIX the mqconfig output, directly in the top-level MQ errors directory. Both the runmqras automation tool and the manual collection steps below collect files found there.


  2. Collect data automatically with the runmqras command if you are running IBM MQ V9.0 or V8.0, or WebSphere MQ V7.5, V7.1.0.1 or later, or V7.0.1.8 or later. Be sure to collect the runmqras defs, cluster and trace sections, and to specify your PMR number:

    1. Collecting runmqras output from queue manager QMA


      runmqras -section defs,cluster,trace -qmlist QMA -pmrno 12345,67R,890


  3. Alternatively, collect the MQ data manually.

    Collecting MQ data manually


    1. If your system has more than one MQ installation, use the setmqenv command to choose the one with the problem before proceeding:

      Linux and UNIX


      sh> . /path/to/mqm/bin/setmqenv -n InstallationX

      Windows


      C:\> "C:\Program Files\IBM\MQ\bin\setmqenv" -n InstallationX


    2. Record the MQ version and maintenance level.


    3. Record the operating system version and maintenance level.


    4. Save the MQ configuration information, for example registry keys and ini files.


    5. If your system has more than one MQ installation, record your MQ installation details:

      Linux and UNIX


      sh> dspmqinst > /tmp/dspmqinst.txt

      Windows


      C:\> dspmqinst > %TEMP%/dspmqinst.txt


    6. Record the MQ processes active on your system:

      Linux and UNIX


      sh> ps -ef | grep mq > /tmp/ps.txt

      Windows


      C:\> TASKLIST /V > %TEMP%/tasklist.txt

      IBM i Command Line


      ===> WRKACTJOB SBS(QMQM)

      IBM i Qshell


      ===> ps -ef | grep mq > /tmp/ps.txt


    7. On MQ V7.1 and later installations, use dmpmqcfg to record the queue manager configuration:

      Linux and UNIX


      sh> dmpmqcfg -m QMA > /tmp/QMA.config.txt

      Windows


      C:\> dmpmqcfg -m QMA > %TEMP%\QMA.config.txt

      IBM i Qshell


      ===> /QSYS.LIB/QMQM.LIB/DMPMQCFG.PGM -m QMA > /tmp/QMA.config.txt


    8. Otherwise, on MQ V7.0 and earlier installations, use runmqsc to record the queue manager configuration. If any command gives an error, carry on with the others:

      DISPLAY QMGR ALL
      DISPLAY Q(*) ALL
      DISPLAY SUB(*) ALL
      DISPLAY TOPIC(*) ALL
      DISPLAY CHANNEL(*) ALL
      DISPLAY SERVICE(*) ALL
      DISPLAY PROCESS(*) ALL
      DISPLAY LISTENER(*) ALL
      DISPLAY NAMELIST(*) ALL


    9. On all MQ installations, use runmqsc to record status information from the queue manager. If any command gives an error, carry on with the others:

      DISPLAY PUBSUB ALL
      DISPLAY QMSTATUS ALL
      DISPLAY CHSTATUS(*) ALL
      DISPLAY LSSTATUS(*) ALL
      DISPLAY SVSTATUS(*) ALL
      DISPLAY SBSTATUS(*) ALL
      DISPLAY CONN(*) TYPE(*) ALL
      DISPLAY QSTATUS(*) TYPE(QUEUE) ALL
      DISPLAY QSTATUS(*) TYPE(HANDLE) ALL
      DISPLAY TPSTATUS('#') TYPE(PUB) ALL
      DISPLAY TPSTATUS('#') TYPE(SUB) ALL
      DISPLAY TPSTATUS('#') TYPE(TOPIC) ALL


    10. On MQ installations, use runmqsc to record information about cluster objects known to the queue manager. If any command gives an error, carry on with the others:

      DISPLAY CLUSQMGR(*) ALL
      DISPLAY QCLUSTER(*) ALL
      DISPLAY TCLUSTER(*) ALL


    11. Manually package your files for IBM, including files containing the output from the commands listed in Step 1 and 2.


Step 3: Send Data to IBM


  1. Send your data to the /toibm/websphere directory on the IBM ECuRep repository by standard or secure HTTP or FTP, or by using the IBM Secure Diagnostic Data Upload Utility (SDDUU) Java application. Be sure to include the full PMR number in the file name so that it will be associated with your problem, e.g. 12345,69R,890-hangdata.zip. Small files may be emailed to websphere_support@ecurep.ibm.com if you put the full PMR number in the subject of your note.


  2. While the data is transferring, send an email or use the IBM Service Request tool to update your PMR with your description of the problem and of the data you are sending.



  3. Contact your country representative if you need to speak to an IBM technical support representative, or in the US call 1-800-IBM-SERV. Refer to the IBM Software Support Handbook for more information on working with IBM.


Internal Use Only

Backup Copy


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Step 1: Generate Data

In order to solve most hang or high CPU problems, it is essential that you generate certain data while the problem is happening on your system. Please try to generate the following diagnostic data before proceeding to Step 2 to collect other information logged by WebSphere MQ:


  1. Gather debugging data from the queue manager processes and any affected applications.

Debugging data includes information such as stack dumps, which show a snapshot of what all threads in a process are doing at a moment in time. It is best to gather more than one set of stack data so that IBM can see whether a process is stuck or making progress over time. For example, generate one set of stack data, wait 30 seconds or more, generate a second set of stack data, wait again, then generate a third set of stack data.



Generate debugging data on IBM i

Use the MQSTACK tool to generate stack data from WebSphere MQ.



Generate debugging data on Linux and UNIX

Use the stackit script to generate stack data from WebSphere MQ and any affected applications. Then use the sigdump script just once to generate FDC files containing additional diagnostic data from the queue manager processes. For example:


sh> stackit -m QMA -n myapp -f stackit-1.txt
sh> sleep 30
sh> stackit -m QMA -n myapp -f stackit-2.txt
sh> sleep 30
sh> stackit -m QMA -n myapp -f stackit-3.txt
sh> sigdump -m QMA




Alternatively, you can use the mqhangdoc script to generate a WebSphere MQ trace, three sets of stackit output, and sigdump output all in one step. Be aware that the mqhangdoc script only generates stack data from queue manager processes, so you must run stackit manually against applications.





Generate debugging data on Windows

Use the Command Prompt ("cmd" in the Start Menu) to save the output from:

C:\> tasklist /v


Use the Microsoft PsList tool to save the output from:

C:\> pslist -x


Use the Microsoft Handle tool to display all WebSphere MQ processes and any affected applications by giving it the first few characters of the application name. For example:

C:\> handle -a -p amq
C:\> handle -a -p runmq


Use the Microsoft ADPlus tool to gather data from hangs (or even crashes) of the WebSphere MQ processes and any affected applications. For example:

C:\> adplus -hang -pn amqzxma0.exe
C:\> adplus -hang -pn amqzlaa0.exe
C:\> adplus -crash -pn runmqchi.exe


Use the Microsoft Process Monitor tool to provide real-time stack data, loaded modules, environment information, files accessed, libraries used, registry keys accessed, and more information. Please note that this tool can be very CPU intensive, even with filtering options set. Refer to the section "Scripting Process Monitor" in the included procmon.chm help file for information on using it in a script or batch file.





  1. WebSphere MQ trace of the queue manager when the hang or high CPU issue is happening.

Try to start and stop trace as quickly as possible in order to limit both the overhead of tracing and the size of the trace files. In most cases, a minute or less of trace is sufficient to show how the queue manager processes are performing. On systems other than IBM i and Windows, format the trace files after stopping the trace.



  1. If the hang or high CPU problem is with a Java or JMS application, please follow the Java or JMS instructions to gather trace from the application.


  1. If the hang or high CPU usage is affecting a WebSphere Application Server process, please follow the WebSphere Application Server performance, hang, or high CPU MustGather instructions for your platform.


  1. Save the performance metrics you are using the evaluate the problem, and describe how you are gathering performance data. For example, list the monitoring tools you are using, whether they are operating system utilities or Tivoli performance tools, and describe what values (queue depths, I/O rates, CPU figures, network traffic rates) you are collecting.


Step 2: Collect Data

Collect the following data for the hang or high CPU problem. Use the runmqras tool if your WebSphere MQ installation is V7.0.1.8 or later, V7.1.0.1 or later, or V7.5, otherwise follow the manual instructions:


  1. WebSphere MQ data from the queue manager or client showing the hang or high CPU problem.


Collect WebSphere MQ data automatically with runmqras

WebSphere MQ includes an automated data collection tool called runmqras which you can use if you are running WebSphere MQ V7.0.1.8 or later, V7.1.0.1 or later, or V7.5.



Follow the WebSphere MQ runmqras usage instructions to gather data for your hang or high CPU problem:
  • Always gather object definitions on the queue manager using the section defs
  • If you generated trace files in Step 1, collect them by including the section trace


Examples

  1. If the hang or high CPU is on queue manager QMA:

    runmqras -section defs -qmlist QMA


  2. If the problem is with queue managers QMA and QMB and you have traces:

    runmqras -section defs,trace -qmlist QMA,QMB


  3. To collect information from all queue managers, including any traces from step 1:

    runmqras -section defs,trace


  4. If you wish to send the data to IBM by FTP, you can do so using your PMR number:

    runmqras -section defs,trace -qmlist QMA -pmrno 12345,67R,890 -ftp IBM


Collect WebSphere MQ data manually


  1. If your system has multiple WebSphere MQ installations, issue the setmqenv command to choose the right installation. On Linux and UNIX, source setmqenv using a dot. For example:

    Linux & UNIX
    sh> . /path/to/mqm/bin/setmqenv -n Installation0

    Windows
    C:\> C:\Program Files (x86)\IBM\WebSphere MQ\bin\setmqenv -s


  2. Record the operating system version and maintenance level.


  3. Record the WebSphere MQ version and maintenance level.


  4. Collect the WebSphere MQ error logs as well as any WebSphere MQ FFST files. On IBM i, follow these instructions to save the necessary files and job logs.

  5. Save the WebSphere MQ configuration information, e.g. registry keys or ini files, where applicable.


  6. If you are running WebSphere MQ V7.1 or later on platforms other than IBM i, display your installations:

    Linux & UNIX
        sh> dspmqinst

    Windows
        C:\> dspmqinst


  7. Display your queue managers and their status:

    IBM i Q Shell
        ===> /QSYS.LIB/QMQM.LIB/DSPMQ.PGM -a

    Linux & UNIX
        sh> dspmq -a

    Windows
        C:\> dspmq -a


  8. Display the WebSphere MQ processes active on your system:

    IBM i Command Line
        ===> WRKACTJOB SBS(QMQM)

    IBM i Q shell
        ===> ps -ef | grep mq

    Linux & UNIX
        sh> ps -ef | grep mq

    Windows
        C:\> tasklist /v


  9. If you are running WebSphere MQ V7.1 or later, dump its configuration to a file for review:

    IBM i Q Shell
        ===> /QSYS.LIB/QMQM.LIB/DMPMQCFG.PGM -m QMGR > /tmp/qmconfig.txt

    Linux & UNIX
        sh> dmpmqcfg -m QMGR > /tmp/qmconfig.txt

    Windows
        C:\> dmpmqcfg -m QMGR > %TMP%\qmconfig.txt



    For earlier versions of WebSphere MQ, use runmqsc to record your object definitions. If any command gives an error, carry on with the others:

    DISPLAY QMGR ALL
    DISPLAY Q(*) ALL
    DISPLAY SUB(*) ALL
    DISPLAY TOPIC(*) ALL
    DISPLAY CHANNEL(*) ALL
    DISPLAY CHLAUTH(*) ALL
    DISPLAY SERVICE(*) ALL
    DISPLAY PROCESS(*) ALL
    DISPLAY LISTENER(*) ALL
    DISPLAY NAMELIST(*) ALL



  10. If the problem is related to processing of messages or network communications on a queue manager, use runmqsc to record its status information. If any command gives an error, carry on with the others:

    DISPLAY PUBSUB ALL
    DISPLAY QMSTATUS ALL
    DISPLAY CHSTATUS(*) ALL
    DISPLAY LSSTATUS(*) ALL
    DISPLAY SVSTATUS(*) ALL
    DISPLAY SBSTATUS(*) ALL
    DISPLAY CONN(*) TYPE(*) ALL
    DISPLAY QSTATUS(*) TYPE(QUEUE) ALL
    DISPLAY QSTATUS(*) TYPE(HANDLE) ALL


  1. Manually collect the traces and debugging data you generated in Step 1.


  1. On Linux and UNIX systems, please send the output from the mqconfig script from the system in addition to the other WebSphere MQ data.



Step 3: Analyze Data


You can now analyze WebSphere MQ data with IBM Support Assistant tools such as IBM Support Assistant Team Server. Using a web browser, you can see an overview of your system based on the data you collected, review problem symptoms found in the data, and search IBM's Global Knowledge Base for relevant Fix Packs, APARs and Technotes. Follow these steps until you find a solution for your hang or high CPU usage problem:

  1. Review the IBM Support Assistant findings.
  2. Check for similar issues on the WebSphere MQ Support Portal.
  3. Use IBM Service Request to open a problem record with IBM.
  4. Send your data to IBM for further analysis.



  • Tell us what errors you saw, where you saw them, and what time they happened
  • Let us know if you made any changes to WebSphere MQ or the system before the problem
  • Share any other observations which you think will help us to better understand the problem




Please see the IBM Software Support Handbook for more information on working with IBM support.


Old text (replaced 29 March, 2013):

Do you want to automate the collection of MustGather data?
Collecting the following MustGather information has now been automated in the IBM Support Assistant. For more information about automating data collection, see Using IBM Support Assistant to collect MustGather data.


Gather this MustGather data before contacting IBM Support:
Collecting general data for all problems
Collecting troubleshooting data for this problem
Troubleshooting hints and tips
Exchanging data with IBM Support

Go back to: WebSphere MQ (MustGather) Read First

Collecting general data for all problems

A complete description of the problem, including the following:

Collecting troubleshooting data for this problem

Required (MustGather) data:

Optional (MustGather) data:

Troubleshooting hints and tips

  • Search the WebSphere MQ support site for known problems using symptoms like the message number and error codes.
  • Gather the documentation and work with the WebSphere MQ support team to resolve your problem.
  • Review the error logs and FFSTs generated at the point of failure.

Learn more about this component
Exchanging data with IBM Support

If you need to speak to an IBM technical support representative call your country representative. If you need to speak to an IBM technical support representative in the US call 1-800-IBM-SERV.

[{"Product":{"code":"SSFKSJ","label":"WebSphere MQ"},"Business Unit":{"code":"BU004","label":"Hybrid Cloud"},"Component":"Problem Determination","Platform":[{"code":"PF002","label":"AIX"},{"code":"PF010","label":"HP-UX"},{"code":"PF012","label":"IBM i"},{"code":"PF016","label":"Linux"},{"code":"PF027","label":"Solaris"},{"code":"PF033","label":"Windows"}],"Version":"9.0;8.0;7.5;7.1;7.0;6.0","Edition":"All Editions"}]

Product Alias/Synonym

IBMMQ WebSphere MQ WMQ

Document Information

Modified date:
22 June 2018

UID

swg21293105