Look inside: The dark world of cybercrime

You may be surprised to learn that today, 80 percent of cybercrime is carried out by organized groups. Staying hidden from law enforcement, in the shadows of the Dark Web, criminals use illicit marketplaces to buy and sell stolen identities, or purchase malicious software like ransomware.

Fighting back with AI

Because new threats emerge and spread so quickly, traditional cybersecurity defenses can’t match advanced attacks. Artificial intelligence (AI) is changing the equation and giving crime fighters the advantage.

What is AI?

AI, short for artificial intelligence, is the simulation of intelligent behavior by computers. AI isn’t as smart as people — and won’t be for a long time. But computers can consume vast quantities of data much faster than people can. Leveraging the power of AI technology, human security analysts can detect and respond to threats in minutes, rather than hours or days.

Watson for Cyber Security

Watson is IBM’s AI computer – the one who beat human contestants on the gameshow JEOPARDY! Watson’s cognitive capabilities can help human analysts make connections between security events and recognize new threats.

Responding to a cyberattack

Just as first responders need to train to stay ready for emergencies, companies should practice their response to a cyberattack. Yet 77 percent of companies have no plan in place. The IBM® X-Force® Command Center and Cyber Range allows organizations to experience a simulated attack.

Essential best practices: How to stay secure

Cybercriminals use sophisticated techniques to evade defenses, but you can prevent most attacks with basic security hygiene.

Create strong passwords

Create strong passwords

Use long phrases that combine multiple words with a mix of letters, numbers and special characters. Choose a phrase that is easy for you to remember but isn’t easy for anyone else to guess. Never use the same password for multiple accounts.

Be cautious of links and attachments in emails

Be cautious of links and attachments in emails

Cybercriminals use malicious links and attachments in spam emails to infect your computer or steal your passwords. Instead of clicking a link in a message claiming to come from your bank, for example, go to your bank’s website directly. Don’t download attachments you weren’t expecting. Even innocent-seeming Word documents can contain threats like ransomware or Trojans.

Keep computers and software up-to-date

Keep computers and software up-to-date

Update your computers, devices and software when prompted. These updates fix bugs and vulnerabilities a criminal might be able to use to attack you.

Use antivirus software

Use antivirus software

Antivirus is good at blocking known threats. However, antivirus alone is not enough. Cybercriminals constantly create new threats that evade detection.

Secure sensitive accounts with two-step authentication

Secure sensitive accounts with two-step authentication

Two-step authentication adds an extra layer of security to your accounts by requiring you to enter a unique code sent to your phone or email, in addition to your password. This feature can protect your sensitive accounts like banking, email and social media if someone steals your password.

Avoid easy-to-guess answers to security questions

Avoid easy-to-guess answers to security questions

For example, your mother’s maiden name, your street address, or your pet’s name might be publicly available on social media. Don't offer up this personal information in social media quizzes.

Protect your personal computer and devices

Check out these top tips to avoid malware infections and identity theft

Join the fight

A shortage of trained cybersecurity professionals is leaving many organizations vulnerable. And the skills gap is expected to get worse. By 2022, there will be 1.8 million vacant cybersecurity positions worldwide. To win the fight against cybercrime, we need skilled cybersecurity warriors like you.

Find out if cybersecurity is the career for you

Cybersecurity professionals require many skills, including some that can’t be taught in a classroom – they have to be learned on the job. That's why cybersecurity pros come from diverse backgrounds. If you’re interested in a cybersecurity career, here are a few ways to get started.

Learn about the field.

Learn about the field

Search on major job sites to see current qualifications, certification and experience.

 

Build your skills.

Build your skills

Sign up for courses and certifications, attend conferences and events, and stay current with news, trends and technologies.

Expand your network

Expand your network

Look for mentors in the field, ask questions and find inspiration from others who have made the leap.