Driving ahead with ASPICE

Comply with automotive industry standards and accelerate time to market using IBM® Engineering Lifecycle Management software

Introduction: Driving ahead

IoT, AI and the power of innovation

2 min read

01

Compliance in the automotive industry

Technological innovation demands new standards

3 min read

02

ASPICE is gaining global momentum

Complex automotive software require comprehensive process management

4 min read

03

IBM and ASPICE

A comprehensive solution to ensure compliance

3 min read

04

AI and machine learning

Simply drag and drop to stay on top of the work

3 min read

05

Conclusion: Gear up for the future

Expedite development while improving quality and time to market

2 min read

06

Driving ahead with ASPICE

01

Introduction

2 min read

More than a hundred million lines of code. That’s what goes into the design and manufacture of today’s computerized vehicles. Our cars have become so incredibly software-driven in recent years that the only thing more complex may be the people who operate them. But do they actually drive them? Certainly not for long.

Seizing on the advanced capabilities of IoT, AI and machine learning, automotive engineers are changing the automotive industry in ways that were once unimaginable. Self-driving cars make navigational decisions. Computerized systems detect future failure. Controls adapt to the user’s preferences. Accurate, real-time geospatial information streams into the cockpit. Infotainment systems rival those in the home. And under the hood of all this advanced technology is another layer of sophisticated software that operates and synchronizes every function.

As you would imagine, the development of these automotive engineering advancements has precipitated the need for tougher industry standards. Adherence to regulations such as ASPICE (Automotive Software Performance Improvement and Capability Determination) is now not only advised, but mandatory. And this presents a challenge to automotive engineers throughout the world. How do you comply with exponentially increasing sets of regulations, created by numerous governing bodies, with requirements that could make your products prohibitively expensive?

That’s where IBM Engineering can help.

Whatever the future of the auto industry holds, IBM will be right there with you, guiding your software and product development processes and ensuring compliance with evolving industry standards. We’ll be there to help you break down barriers to success by providing the tools you need to develop, test and reconfigure. And we’ll enable you to do it more reliably, more quickly, and more collaboratively. Better than you’ve ever done before.

Welcome to an era of accelerated innovation, empowered by IBM expertise.

Where the rubber meets the road…

Connected cars process up to

25 gigabytes

of data per hour

Car software may be over

100 million

lines of code

Connected car market is predicted to be

USD 219.21 billion

by 2025

The route can be perilous

But they’re doing so without fully evaluating risk or preparing effective responses

87%

of automotive companies are implementing Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) technologies in plants and assembly lines

That’s because 87% of automotive companies surveyed do not have a formally established IIoT cybersecurity program

86 %

of automotive companies surveyed do not perform regular IIoT cybersecurity assessments

But predictive maintenance applications were not as high on the list as expected

75%

of automotive suppliers have automated workflow applications

02 Compliance in the automotive industry

Driving ahead with ASPICE

02

Compliance in the automotive industry

03 min read

After a century of accelerated technological innovation and profound changes in consumer expectations, cars have become high-efficiency, multipurpose commodities, powered by sophisticated software. Features that were once unimaginable are quickly becoming commonplace: electric and hybrid motors, advanced sensors, modular systems, infotainment systems and personalized settings. What’s next is anybody’s guess.

Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black.

Henry Ford

With all these integrated systems, and their interconnectivity inside and outside the vehicle, a lot more things can go wrong. And when a system malfunctions, it can do so with catastrophic results. Just read the headlines and you’ll see how devastating a single failure can be – not only to the driver and others on the roads, but also to the progress that is brought to a screeching halt when safety-critical errors occur.

When an entire industry can be impacted by a single, serious incident, compliance becomes imperative

Automotive industry standards help ensure clear communication throughout the product lifecycle. The traceability they demand helps product designers, engineers and testers to confidently develop and market safer, more reliable vehicles. These standards also ensure that the data that is created, captured, stored and communicated to and from these vehicles is not only accurate, but properly managed. The electronics and communications systems they power are private and secure. The standards now being introduced, adopted and in some cases mandated, apply not only to auto manufacturers, but to their suppliers as well.

You’re only as good as your worst supplier

Electrification

Electrification

Electric motors,
power electronics,
advanced batteries

IoT Hardware

IoT Hardware

Advanced sensors,
corner modules

Industrial design

Industrial design

Advanced user interfaces, modular bodies

Autonomous driving

Autonomous driving

Advanced central oprating system with self-driving capabilities

Changes in technology lead to a new ecosystem of suppliers

Now, there’s a sobering thought. But all it takes is one unforeseen problem to bring your business to a crashing halt. So if you’re manufacturing a car with 30,000 parts, and 100 million lines of code – coming from 40 different suppliers – you’ve got a lot of opportunity for error.

New electronic components that increase risk include:

  • Control systems
  • Collision avoidance
  • Adaptive cruise control
  • Lane-keeping assistance
  • Vehicle-to-vehicle communication
  • Hands off steering

When you consider how many suppliers your own organization has, and how many suppliers they utilize, you can’t help but be awed by the enormity of the automotive supply chain. And you can easily envision how easy it could be for any manufacturer to inadvertently put itself in peril.

Automotive legal experts urge automotive manufacturers to adhere to industry standards and to be extremely attentive to the responsibilities that their original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) accept for testing, handling warranty claims and determining the root causes of failures.

Experts in the auto industry urge manufacturers to create a trusted ecosystem of partners that collaborates, tests and refines products from inception through the entire lifecycle of the vehicle. Only by engaging with trusted suppliers who adhere to regulatory standards can any organization be assured that their processes and products meet stringent guidelines for safety, security, quality and performance.

Compliance can be your competitive advantage

Standards such as Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) and Automotive Software Performance Improvement and Capability Determination (ASPICE) define an established framework for measuring process quality, while others relate to safety and security. Adhering to these standards can lead to higher product quality and efficiency, and lower failure rates. To the corporation, this means reduced risk, lower costs, greater sales and stronger brand loyalty.

Process quality

Process quality

Safety :

An IBM Institute of Business Value study indicated that cognitive performance will improve safety. Process standards, such as ASPICE, will help improve cognitive performance.

77 %
of cognitive innovators said cognitive technologies will have a significant impact on vehicle safety and the ability to save lives due to accidents

Security :

An IBM Institute of Business Value consumer study revealed that

62 %
of consumers said they would consider one brand over another if it had better security and privacy

03 ASPICE is gaining global momentum

Driving ahead with ASPICE

03

ASPICE is gaining global momentum

4 min read

Across the globe, industry regulatory bodies have recognized how incredibly complex the automobile has become. The increase in software and high-speed connectivity of complex electronic systems that are now so critical to design and operation have a profound impact on performance. So to ensure the quality, safety and security of the products they oversee, these organizations have developed strict industry standards. One of the most comprehensive set of guidelines, and one that is gaining global momentum, is ASPICE.

ASPICE (Automotive Software Process Improvement Capability Determination) is an extendable process assessment model for the automotive industry, focused on software development.

ASPICE incorporates both governance and assessment. It guides the processes for the development, integration, collaboration and testing of a vehicle. It establishes six levels of capability – and the criteria for each level of achievement. It also defines how a process will be assessed.

Governance: Governance is maintained by automotive companies and required by automotive OEMs.

Assessment: Projects shall follow state of the art system and software engineering practices

ASPICE was originally created for German OEMs, to ensure the quality of single components. At the time, software was only part of the control unit. However, with the accelerated proliferation of software in development and the advent of sophisticated vehicle systems, ASPICE became the accepted standard for automotive OEMs throughout the world.

Unlike many regulations that cover the activities of the entire organization, ASPICE is specific to individual processes. It serves as an overarching framework working in the context of other automotive standards such as ISO26262 and ISO21434. Thus, it requires a tremendous amount of commitment to achieve compliance.

The final product can be only as good as the components used to create it

The adoption of ASPICE is moving beyond manufacturers into the expansive realm of the OEM market. Collaboration and transparency between organizations throughout the process are paramount if all regulations are to be met.

Suppliers must demonstrate ASPICE compliance if they’re to remain in the manufacturer’s ecosystem. And unless a supplier can prove adherence to these guidelines, they will not be invited to submit bids. Thus, ASPICE is becoming a prerequisite to doing business.

ASPICE Key Challenge

ASPICE Key Challenge

ASPICE handles dependencies of work products and processes

ASPICE defines capability levels and associated process attributes

OEMs commonly require and aim for Level 3, but the industry leaders are working toward Level 5.

Optimizing process    Optimizing process

Process innovation
Process optimization

Managed process    Managed process

Performance management
Work product management

Predictable process    Predictable process

Process measurement
Process control

Performed process    Performed process

Process performance

Established process    Established process

Process definition
Process deployment

Incomplete process    Incomplete process

Incomplete process

04 IBM and ASPICE

Driving ahead with ASPICE

04

IBM and ASPICE

3 min read

IBM does not create products more efficiently, we help our customers create products more efficiently. Relying on our industry-specific software and services, and drawing upon their own ingenuity, automotive manufacturers and suppliers are better able to innovate and differentiate to succeed in an aggressively competitive market.

Now, to help our customers improve processes while ensuring compliance, we offer a comprehensive solution, IBM Engineering Lifecycle Management (ELM).

IBM ELM enables automotive manufacturers and suppliers to address the complex and comprehensive regulations and processes defined by ASPICE. To create this solution, we worked diligently with industry experts: ASPICE assessors and practitioner committees.

IBM Engineering Lifecycle Management (ELM) helps automotive manufacturers and suppliers achieve compliance with ASPICE.

What is
IBM ELM?

IBM ELM is a cloud or SaaS-based portfolio that delivers the tools necessary to help manage the complexity of product development. It enables digital requirements management, test management, systems design and agile tracking to help organizations achieve ASPICE compliance.

The IBM ELM toolkit creates an infrastructure to manage the complex vehicle development ecosystem.

How does
it work?

ASPICE itself defines only a framework of what needs to be done and what information needs to be presented.

IBM Engineering Requirements Management offers templates required for ASPICE implementation, and processes for collaboration, testing and reporting.

The IBM ASPICE templates improve the implementation speed and adoption of the ASPICE standard.

Why is IBM Engineering Requirements Management needed?

Traditional requirements management methods are ill-equipped to provide the templates, tools and processes necessary to manage complex data-driven vehicles and the ASPICE standards that apply to them.

IBM accelerates ASPICE compliance with five pillars

Accelerators

Accelerators

Simplify compliance with industry standards by providing repeatable patterns as templates

IBM Services

IBM Services

Harmonize customer processes with industry standards and support them in leveraging accelerators

Partner Ecosystem

Partner Ecosystem

Integrate with compliance tools and connect IBM customers with industry experts

Practitioner Committee

Practitioner Committee

Collaborate with mature practitioners to align compliance support with market demand

Thought Leadership

Thought Leadership

Publish insights about industry challenges and best practices

ELM Base Solution

ELM Base Solution – Engineering Requirements Management

Create sample content for usage patterns.
Close gaps that hinder compliance certification.
Identify core features related to compliance.

IBM Engineering Requirements Management incorporates compliance accelerators to assure adherence to guidelines

AI Capabilities

AI Capabilities

Differentiating features for efficiency and quality

Reports

Reports

Insight into compliance status for assessments

Sample Data

Sample Data

Best practice example how to work with IBM

Templates

Templates

Custom project setup tailored for compliance

Method

Method

Process definition and guidelines

Engineering Lifecycle Management

Engineering Lifecycle Management

Capabilities to define, design, build, test and release complex products

05 IBM and ASPICE

Driving ahead with ASPICE

05

AI and Machine learning

3 min read

With some analysts estimating that robocars will add $7 trillion to the economy, many manufacturers have already launched initiatives to develop autonomous vehicles. They’ve dedicated huge resources to accelerate the introduction of driver-assisted and driverless cars, so they won’t be left at the starting gate while others capture new market share. You may already be working on this next huge phase of automotive innovation.

As you would expect, the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) is forcing new methods and approaches for automotive engineering processes. Those that are currently in place tend to treat artificial intelligence models as just another piece of software. But AI systems are fundamentally different, and existing methods are inadequate to accommodate their design and development. To manage the rising complexity resulting from massive amounts of data, systems engineers must seek out better tools, specifically designed for more complicated and entangled applications.

Artificial Intelligence and the Intelligent System

The system learns to recognize patterns from data and is capable of continuously refining itself by learning from additional data.

Learning

Learning

The system makes choices that direct its learning without specific programming by a human. In addition to learning, the choices made during the creation of the algorithm are of the system’s own making, potentially without human supervision.

Self-direction

Self-direction

AI is fundamentally changing the auto industry

  • Machine learning and deep learning
  • Getting smarter over time
  • Requirements by design – using AI
  • Improved decision making

Very few regulations today deal specifically with autonomous systems, but that will change as those systems become more prevalent, and as product liability potentially puts even greater onus on manufacturers and suppliers to ensure adequate governance over the engineering process for these intelligent systems.

As AI becomes fully adopted in the automotive industry, systems engineering teams will need to adapt to the change. Embracing a digital transformation, including AI, will allow software and product developers to more accurately define requirements with intelligence that creates an accelerated path to compliance.

How will AI be used in automotive systems engineering?

Bringing AI to requirements authoring can leverage Natural Language Processing to help avoid inaccuracy and ambiguity

Improved requirements

Improved requirements

Global teams of teams create global systems of systems, leveraging AI for consistency across a project

Improved Collaboration

Improved Collaboration

Accelerate decision making during testing based on quality requirements

Improved Testing

Improved Testing

Automotive companies are not prepared for the challenges of AI over the next decade

In a recent study by IBM, automotive executives revealed that their companies are:

>20%

fully prepared

75%

somewhat prepared

60%

somewhat adaptable

06 Conclusion

Driving ahead with ASPICE

06

Conclusion: Gear up for the future

2 min read

There has never been a more exciting time in the history of auto making. IoT and AI innovation is occurring at such a rapid pace that systems engineers are challenged to keep up. Consumers expect features that were once unheard of. Manufacturers push ahead with new disruptive technologies as they race to differentiate themselves. Regulatory bodies scramble to develop standards and criteria to accommodate all this change.

And the systems engineer is, all too often, struggling to manage the engineering process with outdated and inadequate techniques.

IBM has created an end-to-end engineering lifecycle management solution that helps you meet the stringent requirements of ASPICE, and incorporates every phase of development: design, review, testing and compliance. As you would expect from us, it will also adapt to whatever lies ahead in the future.

For over a century now, automotive manufacturers and IBM have not only embraced innovation, but have driven it. Together, we have changed how the world thinks and moves, always moving ahead.

And we appreciate that behind all the astounding advancements in these industries have been systems engineers who guided and adapted the processes.

Your inspiration and ingenuity – your passion and persistence – can forever continue on the road to progress. Because wherever your imagination wants to take you, IBM will help get you there.

ELM Base Solution

ELM - IBM Engineering Lifecycle Management

Sophisticated capabilities for systems engineering

Compliance - Industry Compliance for Automotive

Customization and reporting for ASPICE & ISO -26262

Agile Method Content

Safe process and Customization for agile organizations

Customer Process Alignment

Services for tailring, provisioning and enablement

Next steps