{IBM Product Name}
{Book a meeting} {Read the data sheet (614 KB)}
{IBM Product Name} {Book a meeting} {Read the data sheet (614 KB)}

{Page may also use "Leadspace Centered." Select one leadspace type for display.}

{Page description from IA: [IBM Product Name] is [shape (type of hardware, software, etc.)] with [main feature(s)] that [benefit]. [Mention former product name, if applicable.] [It's part of brand/family, if applicable] and available as [additional product shapes, if applicable].}

{First, describe the client challenge in one or two sentences, illuminating the primary pain point while identifying with the current mental model. Next, hint at the new way of doing things that the product offers. Highlight what makes the product special compared to peers. Be specific. Consider this structure: This IBM [differentiated offering type] delivers [value] using [feature].

{Elaborate on additional differentiators and technical ways the product provides value and uniquely solves the client problem. Include IBM’s unique POV.} 


  • {Additional differentiator: Take inspiration from the best sentences from related sales or messaging materials.}
  • {Technical detail: Avoid marketing jargon. It’s vague and doesn’t translate well for globalization.}
  • {Technical detail: Give the target audience the phrase or analogy that will make them look smart or bring new perspective to the product’s theme.}

{Expand on an exciting business benefit or usage}
{Describe more business benefits and how the product helps solve a pain point. It’s not recommended to include a standalone benefits section, so weave them in here. Include inline links throughout. Look at reviews and client stories to learn how the target audience talks about this in their own words. Add more subsections as needed and, if it exists, include a superior video or image below.}

{Groundbreaking product release or big event news}

{If used below the card, only a promo/offer can go here; link to pricing}

Benefits {State client advantage gained}

{Instead of using this section, weave benefits in throughout the page. If using this section, each headline should state what the benefit allows clients to do. In the body,...}

{State client advantage gained}

{...go deeper into how a benefit is achieved. What business outcome will the product deliver? How? What special differentiator triggers the benefit? }

{State client advantage gained}

{If any copy sounds like it could apply to any product, make it more specific. Use stats if they are compelling, have a reliable source and directly support a point. }

Features

{Feature category (benefit, function or type)} {Feature name}

{For the eyebrow, use a one- or two-word label. Make sure it’s the same kind of label for each feature (benefits, functions or types): If the eyebrow for your first feature states the benefit that the feature contributes to, each feature's eyebrow should do the same. Write each feature item headline (feature name) according to what it is (noun-based) rather than what it can do (verb-based). Be specific. Ex: "Low-code developer tools," "Role-based redaction," "Enterprise video streaming"}

{Optional descriptive link to feature page or tech detail}

{Feature category (benefit, function or type)} {Feature name} {In the body copy, describe what the feature can do, and what technical aspects allow it to do it. Remember that our clients are technically savvy. Distinguish features (functionality of the product) from benefits (outcomes that help clients achieve objectives).} {Be descriptive for accessibility}

{Feature category (benefit, function or type)} {Feature name}

{Be as technical as possible; avoid marketing jargon. Mention available usage options (add-ons, etc.) and link to options sub-page, if needed, for more details, i.e., each feature may include an inline link to a supporting asset. Avoid adjectives like "open" and "security-rich." Be specific: How is it open? Is all code in Github? Are there 100+ integrations? What makes it security-rich (follows NIST recommendations, externally audited, compliant with standards like PCI-DSS, etc.)?}

{Optional descriptive link to feature page or tech detail}
Features {Feature name}

{Write each feature item headline according to what it is (noun) rather than what it can do (verb). Start with the features that have the greatest impact on value to the client.}

{Optional descriptive link}
{Feature name}

{Each feature name should identify a single distinctive attribute or aspect of the product. For each feature description, highlight its specific technical capabilities.}

{Optional descriptive link}
{Feature name}

{Describe technical aspects helping the feature operate. Get specific about facets, tools or instruments that are part of the feature and how they deliver value to the client.}

{Optional descriptive link}
{Feature name}

{Discern features (functionality) from benefits (outcomes that help clients achieve objectives). Write for a technical audience that wants to understand the inner mechanics.} 

{Optional descriptive link}
{Feature name}

{Be as technical as possible; avoid marketing jargon. Don’t use made up lingo like "automation-aware," which won’t translate for globalization. Each feature may have a standalone link.}

{Optional descriptive link}
{Feature name}

{It’s recommended to use inline links instead of a standalone CTA under a content item. If using a standalone CTA, it may link to a feature detail page or deep-link to a docs page.}

{Optional descriptive link}

Use cases

{Use case name} {For each tab label, use a short, familiar phrase summarizing one way to use the product. The label can repeat as the use case headline or be lengthened. In the body copy, include details about how the use case works. Name specific features or technologies used.} {Active phrase teasing an insight}

Name of the use case For each tab label, use a short, familiar phrase summarizing one way to use the product. The label can repeat as the use case headline or be lengthened. In the body copy, include details about how the use case works. Name specific features or technologies used. Active phrase teasing an insight


Use cases {Use case name}

{There are three approaches for use case names: An active, benefit-oriented label starting with a verb (“Reduce security risks”); an adjective-noun benefit label...}

{Optional link}
{Use case name}

{...(“Predictive incident management”); and a noun label about an area of the business aided by the product (“Customer support”). Be consistent with...}

{Optional link}
{Use case name}

{...headline formats on a single page. In the body copy, expand on the use case name with details about how it works. Name specific features or capabilities used.}

{Optional link}
{Use case name}

{As space allows, briefly describe how the use case alleviates pain points and achieves specific client goals. Use cases can include industry-specific content.}

{Optional link}
{Use case name}

{You may include an optional text link below the body copy to a full use case page, demo, etc. Provide compelling information to inspire readers to click.}

{Optional link}
{Use case name}

{Be as specific as possible in the text CTA to meet accessibility requirements (for example, “Watch data modernization boost engagement 50% (00:00)”).}

{Optional link}
{Pull a great quote from a client story not elsewhere on the page about how product helped. The more conversational, the better.} {Name} {Role} {Company} {Tease a specific result or outcome because there's plenty of space}
Ratings and reviews
Ways to buy

{Introduce the options and be clear about the buying approach (such as licenses) and product form (edition, deployment, configuration, etc). For example, "Get a customized quote for your enterprise or try a full-featured edition of the market-leading SIEM for free.”}

{See pricing or contact us (optional inline link to replace card links)}

{Starting at USD XX for/per X (optional)} {Name of edition, plan, deployment or model}

{Highlight the plan's constraints (“Only supports databases up to 40 GB”), differentiators (“billed monthly,” “managed,” “get free backups”), use cases (“For clients with larger and more complex data requirements...”) and product facts.}

Most popular Enterprise {Active way to buy/deploy}
{Starting at USD XX for/per X (optional)} {Name of edition, plan, deployment or model}

{Example of product facts: "Community Edition is a full-featured free version of QRadar that is low memory and low EPS, and includes a perpetual license." Make sure the copy for each description is the same length.}

Enterprise {Active way to buy/deploy}
{Starting at USD XX for/per X (optional)} {Name of edition, plan, deployment or model}

{CTAs should lead to the product's pricing page or a free edition download page, or open the contact module. If the CTAs are the same for all, instead link to the product's pricing or contact page using the link under the subhead.}

Enterprise {Active way to buy/deploy}
Ways to buy

{Introduce the options and be clear about the buying approach (such as licenses) and product form (edition, deployment, configuration, etc). For example, "Get a customized quote for your enterprise or try a full-featured edition of the market-leading SIEM for free."}

{See pricing or contact us (optional inline link to replace row links)}

{Product edition X, plan X, etc.}

Tag name

{“Starting at USD X,XXX for/per XXX” or “Free license” etc.}

{Highlight the plan’s/edition’s constraints (“Only supports databases up to 40 GB”), differentiators (“billed monthly,” “managed,” “get free backups”), use cases (“For clients with larger and more complex data requirements...”) and product facts.}

{“Get a custom quote” or 
“Download now” etc.}

{Product edition Y, plan Y, etc.}

{“Starting at USD X,XXX for/per XXX” or “Free license” etc.}

{Example of product facts: “Community Edition is a full-featured free version of QRadar that is low memory and low EPS, and includes a perpetual license.” CTAs should lead to the product’s pricing page or a free edition download page, or open the contact module. If the CTAs are the same for all, instead link to the product’s pricing page using the link under the subhead.}

{“Get a custom quote” or 
“Download now” etc.}
Resources {Resource title}

{Select two or more highly useful resources that can help a potential client make a purchase decision. These assets should highlight product features, technologies, applications and technical info.}

{Resource title}

{Prioritize resources in this order: documentation; solution brief, data sheet; demo (quick demos, product tours, hands-on labs); on-demand webcast; blog post (only if highly relevant and evergreen);...}

{Resource title}

{...tutorial; white paper; analyst report; or newsletter. In the eyebrow, name the category but avoid using branded terms most people won’t know, like "Redbook"; instead, use "Publication."}

{Resource title}

{If the resource title is too long or not descriptive enough, write a short headline in sentence case that better summarizes it. Try to use the same format for all resource headlines in this section.}

{Resource title}

{In the body copy, describe the resource in terms of what the client gets. Make it clear how the resource relates to the product. Start with a verb ("Explore," "Discover," "Watch," etc.).}

{Resource title}

{Include more details as space allows. Make sure the copy for each item description in the section is the same length. Each resource link should lead directly to the resource.}

{If the product has a resources subpage, use “View all resources”}
Related products {Official product name}

{Use this component for two or more products and only if the products are strongly related. The relationship between the main product and the related product must be explicit in the copy.}

{Official product name}

{For the section headline, never use "Related solutions" because solutions are a particular content/page type at IBM. In the body copy, describe how the product relates to the page’s product.}

{Official product name}

{Is it an add-on? Is there a role-based overlap? Start the description with a verb to keep it active. Describe the product in terms of what it allows the client to technically do.}

{Official product name}

{If there’s room, mention technology or benefits that relate to the page's product. Make sure the copy for each description is the same length. The component may also include an optional eyebrow.}

{Official product name}

{The eyebrow would be a one- or two-word descriptor to categorize each related product. If the products are from the same family page, include a CTA card link below the content items.}

{Official product name}

{Use this component for two or more products and only if the products are strongly related. The relationship between the page’s product and the related product must be explicit in the copy.}

{If all products are part of an IBM product family, use “Explore more [product family] products}
Take the next step

{Be as specific as possible about the value gained from the CTA button(s). Ex: "Get started with a free trial of IBM Watson Studio or book a consultation with an IBM expert to discuss how it can advance your specific business needs." If a free trial is in the L1 and the leadspace has a CTA button, use both here.}

{Start a free trial} {Book a meeting}
More ways to explore Documentation Support Partners Resources Community
Footnotes

{1 Report title, Publisher, XX Month XXXX}