A culture of inclusion and belonging

Leading with our values and beliefs to ensure that every IBMer can bring their full selves to work.

A culture of inclusion and belonging

Leading with our values and beliefs to ensure that every IBMer can bring their full selves to work.

IBM has more than 100 years of work on diversity, inclusion and equality in the workplace. That legacy, and our continued commitment to advance equity in a global society, has made us leaders in diversity and inclusion.

Guided by our values and beliefs, we’re proud to foster an environment where every IBMer is able to thrive because of their differences, not in spite of them.

Women’s History Month and IBM

This Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day IBM is proud to celebrate the experiences and accomplishments of Women IBMers of all backgrounds.

Real people,
Real stories

We have a rich past, now be part of our future

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2019

First women and black employees hired.

First women and black employees hired

IBM hired three women, Emma Manske, Nettie Moore and Lilly Philp, 20 years before women were given the right to vote. The same year, IBM hired Richard MacGregor, IBM’s first black employee, 10 years before the founding of NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) and 36 years after the Emancipation Proclamation

IBM’s first employee with a disability

First disabled employee hired

IBM hired its first employee with a disability, 59 years before the passage of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and 76 years before the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Women hired as Systems Service Professionals

“ Same Kind of Work for Equal Pay. ” T.J.Watson Sr.

IBM recruited 25 female college graduates, slated to work in systems service. These were the firm’s first female professionals, 29 years before the Equal Pay Act. Thomas J. Watson, Sr. champions the introduction of women into IBM’s professional ranks, as the company holds its first systems engineering service class for women.

Ruth Leach named vice president

First woman VP named

IBM named Ruth Leach (Amonette) a vice president, the company’s first female executive. Between 1940 and 1943, one third of IBM’s manufacturing hires are women.

Braille Pocket writer

First pocket-sized braille printer manufactured and distributed to all employees

IBM manufactures the Banks Pocket Braille Writer, a pocket-sized Braille printer, which it donates to veterans, sells to the public at cost and provides free to all visually impaired employees.

Equal Opportunity Policy

IBM President signs company’s first written equal opportunity policy letter

IBM wrote its first Equal Opportunity Policy. This policy was signed by T. J. Watson, Jr., one year before the Brown decision ending “separate but equal” in public education and 11 years ahead of the 1964 Civil Rights Act in the U.S.

Supplier Diversity

IBM created Supplier Diversity Program

IBM created its supplier diversity program in 1968, before the existence of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA). Our program’s goal is to provide opportunities to diverse suppliers who can add value in every region where we operate. Suppliers qualify by being at least 51 percent owned by people from an ethnic minority (as defined in each country or region), or by women, military veterans, people with disabilities or LGBT+ individuals.

Pioneering speech experimental speech

IBM’s first operational application of speech recognition

IBM’s first operational application of speech recognition enabled customer engineers servicing equipment to “talk” to and receive "spoken" answers from a computer that can recognize about 5,000 words. IBM also developed an experimental terminal that prints computer responses in Braille for the blind.

Pwd Training

IBM’s Computer Program Training for People with Disabilities

IBM’s first operational application of speech recognition enabled customer engineers servicing equipment to “talk” to and receive "spoken" answers from a computer that can recognize about 5,000 words. IBM also developed an experimental terminal that prints computer responses in Braille for the blind.

Raibow Flag

IBM includes sexual-orientation in its equal opportunity policy

Non-discrimination on the Basis of Sexual Orientation Publicly Stated. IBM became one of the first companies to include sexual orientation as part of its commitment to nondiscrimination.

LGBT Partner benefits

Domestic Partner Benefits added in U.S.

IBM announces Domestic Partner Benefits for gay and lesbian employees.

Home Page Reader

IBM introduces Home Page Reader

IBM introduces Home Page Reader, an award-winning Web browser that uses speech to help the blind and visually impaired use the Internet. The first product of its kind, Home Page Reader was developed by blind IBM researcher Chieko Asakawa. The application was offered in the US, Europe and Asia, and was capable of reading web pages in American or British English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Japanese and other languages.

Global work-life fund launched

Global work-life fund launched

This multi-year fund has been designed to address strategic work-life challenges for IBM employees worldwide, focusing on dependent care.

Global Equal Opportunity Policy

Global Equal Opportunity Policy – “ orientation, gender identity and expression ” were added

“ Orientation, gender identity and expression ” were added to U.S. and Global Equal Opportunity Policy.

Accessible workplace

Accessible Workplace Connections launched to request and manage reasonable accommodations

The Human Ability and Accessibility center collaborated with IBM Human Resources and the IBM Office of the CIO to create the Accessible Workplace Connection portal, which makes it easy for managers to accommodate IBMers with disabilities, and teaches those employees about the tools and policies that exist to help them do their jobs on an equal footing with their peers.

Ginny

First Woman CEO appointed – Virginia Rometty

IBM Board of Directors Elects Virginia M. “Ginni” Rometty President and CEO of IBM: Samuel J. Palmisano and Virginia M. “Ginni” Rometty at IBM’s corporate headquarters in Armonk, N.Y. Rometty, an IBM senior vice president, was elected by the IBM board of directors to become the company’s president and ninth CEO on January 1, 2012.

Rainbow logo

Introduced rainbow logo in support of the LGBT community

IBM Launched 8-bar rainbow logo as a new symbol of IBM’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. This is a demonstration of IBM’s continuing efforts to advance and influence nondiscrimination workplace policies consistent with basic human rights.

Catalyst

IBM honored with 2018 Catalyst Award

IBM was honored with the prestigious 2018 Catalyst Award for leadership in building a workplace that values diversity and inclusion. “ Leading the Cognitive Era Powered by the Global Advancement of Women. ” IBM’s global diversity and inclusion initiative has strategically and purposefully focused on technical women’s career development and advancement. HR and global business leaders partner to drive IBM’s diversity and inclusion goals by attracting and recruiting diverse talent, prioritizing leadership development and talent discussions and engaging as a good corporate citizen.

Human Rights Campaign

IBM supported passage of the Equality Act

The Equality Act, or HR 112, called to amend existing laws to provide consistent, explicit protections for LGBT+ employees in the United States. Ginni Rometty stated IBM’s position in a letter to U.S. Congress, and IBM Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Tia Silas testified before the House Judiciary Committee. IBM was the only company invited to testify.

Awards and Recognition

Working mother - Best companies for multicultural woman 2019
Best places to work for LGBT 2020
Top 50 STEM workplaces - winds of change manazine - 2019
Working mother - Best companies for dads 2019
Military friendly employer 2020
Top companies for executive woman - nafe

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