Visualizer User Guide  7.5.0
Building Visualizations > Chart Types >

Comparing Multiple Measures in One Chart

Compare several measures in one chart using measure-based charts . Add a second measure to some chart types using color or height, or choose two or more measures that can be charted along the same scale in other chart types. For example, compare three measures that are represented as a group of indicators along the range of a thermometer chart.

Clustered and Stacked Bar Charts

Compare groups of measures in the clusters or stacks of two- and three-dimensional bar charts. In two-dimensional charts, use two or more measures and one dimension. In three-dimensional charts, use two or more measures and two dimensions. Each measure has a bar in a cluster or a section in a stack. A scale that all the measures share forms the measure (y) axis. In two-dimensional charts, the dimension represents the category (x) axis. In three-dimensional charts, the two dimensions are the horizontal (x and y) axes, and the scale for the measures moves to the vertical axis (z).

Gauge Chart

Use a measure-based gauge chart to compare several measures along a dial-shaped scale. Each measure is shown as an indicator along the scale. Use different indicator shapes and colors to distinguish between the measures.

Add data detail to the chart by showing the indicator values and using the center circle to highlight a measure. Enlarge the circle and show the color for the measure value. You can also show the label for the palette color .

Measure-based gauge charts do not plot a dimension. The values for the measures are the totals for all dimensions for cube data sources or for the column for flat file and relational data sources. You cannot drill up or down in measure-based charts that have no dimension, but you can insert a filter to analyze measures for specific dimensions or categories.

Thermometer Chart

Use a measure-based thermometer chart to view how one or more measures compare on a scale. The primary measure forms the mercury and is highlighted in the bulb of the thermometer. Subsequent measures are depicted as indicators along the thermometer's range.

Add data detail to the chart by showing indicator labels and values , as well as labels for the palette colors .

Measure-based thermometer charts do not plot a dimension. The values for the measures are the totals for all dimensions for cube data sources or for the column for flat file and relational data sources. You cannot drill up or down in measure-based charts that have no dimension, but you can insert a filter to analyze measures for specific dimensions or categories.

Crosstab

Add color to a crosstab chart to depict a second measure in the chart. A crosstab chart uses one dimension for the rows, a second dimension for the columns, and a measure for the cell values. You can add a comparison measure when you insert the chart by using the optional cell coloring. After you create the chart, you cannot add a second measure using color.

Table Chart

Add as many measures to a table chart as you want to compare. When you create the chart, you can select one or more measures to include, or select the entire data source for inclusion in the table. Use color to highlight data ranges for all of the measures or for selected columns. Sort the data in ascending or descending order using any column as a key.

3D Pie Chart

Add height to a three-dimensional pie chart to show a comparison measure in the chart. When you create a pie chart, the size of the pie slices indicates the first measure value, and the color of the slices indicates the categories of the dimension. In a three-dimensional pie chart, you can use the z-axis (height of the slices) to add a second comparison measure.

Maps

Add height, color , and radius to maps to represent more than one measure in the chart. In a two-dimensional point map, choose the radius (the diameter of points) for one measure and color for the second measure. In a three-dimensional point or region map, use color for one measure and the height of the points or regions for the second measure.

Parallel Coordinates

Compare any number of measures and dimensions in one chart using the parallel coordinates chart. A parallel coordinates chart shows a series of vertical axes in a row, one for each of the data items you select. You can show any number of measures or dimensions, or a mixture of both.

Lines connect each category of each axis in the chart with every other category across all the vertical axes. For example, if you plot products, profits, margins, and revenue, a line connects each category in products with its value point on the profits, margins, and revenue axes. You may need to limit the number of data items you add to a parallel coordinates chart to prevent the chart from becoming very cluttered.

Surface Chart

Add color to a surface chart to show a comparison measure in the chart. When you create a surface chart, the height of the surface indicates the first measure value. Use the optional coloring to add a second measure to the chart. For example, you select revenue as the measure for the z-axis and use color to add margin as the second measure.