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Migrating HTML to DITA, Part 2: Extend the migration for more robust results
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) holds many advantages over information authored directly in HTML, including better reuse, easily changed presentation styles, and easy single sourcing. In Part 2 of this two-part series on how to quickly migrate HTML topics to DITA, the author explains the details of migration, and shows you how to override parts of this process for ideal results.
Articles 09 Feb 2005
Migrating HTML to DITA, Part 1: Simple steps to move from HTML to DITA
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) has emerged as a standard topic-oriented document architecture. DITA holds many advantages over information authored directly in HTML, including better reuse, easily changed presentation styles, and easy single sourcing. This article, the first of two parts, explains how to get a quick start with DITA using HTML topics that are already available. It shows you how to use the provided XSLT transform to do the migration, and examines what is needed to ensure quality results.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 31 Jan 2005
Why use DITA to produce HTML deliverables?
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) is an XML-based format for structuring and authoring technical content. This article explores advantages DITA provides for producing HTML content -- including easy global changes, portability through standards, superior linking and Web management, conditional processing, content and design reuse, and better writing through focused content. DITA consolidates all of the benefits in a consistent, overall information architecture that can evolve and grow along with your product information needs and delivery modes, and with the evolution of standard tools for delivering XML as the presentation mechanism.
Articles 28 Sep 2005
Capture use case documents with DITA specialization and extension
Explore how to combine requirement gathering with documentation that development managers, developers, testers, and technical writers can re-purpose throughout the development cycle. The flexible extension mechanism in Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) is becoming an industry standard for this kind of undertaking. In this article, you create a specialized schema for use case documentation.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 19 Apr 2011
Create walk-through and acceptance scripts with single-sourced DITA
Paired with a validating XML editor, Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) provides a useful tool for developing topic-based user documentation that describes how to use your application. With a bit of forethought and planning, you can repurpose these same topics into documents that provide value much earlier in the development process, such as walk-through scripts for use in client demos or acceptance scripts for a manual quality assurance effort.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 02 Nov 2010
Generate DITA Java API reference documentation using DITADoclet and DITA API specialization
Combine DITADoclet and DITA API specialization to save time and still produce quality API documentation directly from the Java source code.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 17 Mar 2014
Implement a DITA publishing solution without abandoning your current publishing system investments
In with the old, in with the new. How did IBM move forward with Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) without investing in a completely new system? This article describes the solution that allowed us to begin working with the new, topic-oriented DITA architecture while continuing to take advantage of our existing, book-oriented SGML tools and content.
Articles 20 Dec 2005
Subject classification with DITA and SKOS
Use a DITA specialization to manage the subject matter of your document content -- that is, identify and process your content based on what each topic is about. With the approach outlined in this article, you can take advantage of the technologies of the Semantic Web for improved search, integration, and other processing. Instead of starting from scratch, however, you can build on standard topic-oriented strategies for authoring and processing content.
Articles 18 Oct 2005
An XML-based information architecture for learning content, Part 2: A DITA content pilot
Find out how topic-based DITA XML can provide the basis for developing an information architecture for single-sourced XML learning content. Part 1 of this two-part series presented a set of extensions to DITA XML that provide the starting point for a unifying content model for learning. Here in Part 2, the authors test their assumptions against pilot content from a training course developed to support a component feature of IBM DB2 Query Monitor, and then report their findings and suggest important next steps.
Articles 11 Aug 2005
An XML-based information architecture for learning content, Part 1: A DITA specialization design
Can topic-based DITA XML provide the basis for developing an information architecture for single-sourced XML learning content? This article builds directly on the rich background about reusable content and e-learning delivery in the learning and training fields. Here in Part 1, the authors posit a set of extensions to DITA XML that provide the starting point for a unifying content model for learning. In Part 2, they test their assumptions against pilot content from a training course developed to support a component feature of IBM DB2 Query Monitor, and then report their findings and suggest important next steps.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 05 Aug 2005
Design patterns for information architecture with DITA map domains
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) provides maps for assembling topics into deliverables. By specializing the map elements, you can define a formal information architecture for your deliverables. This architecture provides guidance to authors on how to organize topics and lets processes recognize your organizing principles, resulting in a consistent, clear experience for your users.
Articles 28 Sep 2005
Specializing domains in DITA
In current approaches, DTDs are static. As a result, DTD designers try to cover every contingency and, when this effort fails, users have to force their information to fit existing types. The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) changes this situation by giving information architects and developers the power to extend a base DTD to cover their domains. This article shows you how to leverage the extensible DITA DTD to describe new domains of information.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 28 Sep 2005
DITA Forum
Get answers to your questions in this DITA forum, hosted by Don Day and Michael Priestley, contributors to DITA and the papers that describe DITA and how to use it.
Articles 28 Sep 2005
Specializing topic types in DITA
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) provides a way for documentation authors and architects to create collections of typed topics that can be easily assembled into various delivery contexts. Topic specialization is the process by which authors and architects can define topic types, while maintaining compatibility with existing style sheets, transforms, and processes. The new topic types are defined as an extension, or delta, relative to an existing topic type, thereby reducing the work necessary to define and maintain the new type.
Articles 28 Sep 2005
Introduction to the Darwin Information Typing Architecture
The Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) is an XML-based, end-to-end architecture for authoring, producing, and delivering technical information. This architecture consists of a set of design principles for creating "information-typed" modules at a topic level and for using that content in delivery modes such as online help and product support portals on the Web. This document is a roadmap for DITA: what it is and how it applies to technical documentation.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 28 Sep 2005
Add structure and semantics to content with XSLT 2.0
When you convert existing content to e-book formats, to DITA, or to other structured standards, you often infer and add structure to your documents. The advanced regular expression and grouping capabilities of XSLT 2.0 make it an excellent language for converting and enhancing content. Discover the features of XSLT 2.0 that are most useful when you convert unstructured or semi-structured narrative content to a more structured vocabulary and work through several common scenarios.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 07 Jul 2011
Building an executable process model for embedded devices
The complexity facing embedded systems architects today is daunting because of added requirements in safety, reliability, and network accessibility. Yet, the tools typically used are often a step behind large-scale software spaces and do not provide the ability to transition smoothly between the detailed device level and a total system view. Learn how to use open source standards such as DITA and PHP and tools such as blob representations to create a system-level environment to address these needs.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 23 Feb 2010
Frequently Asked Questions about the Darwin Information Typing Architecture
DITA experts Don Day, Michael Priestley, and Gretchen Hargis address the topic architecture of DITA, tips and techniques, and general DITA questions.
Articles 28 Sep 2005
XML for publishing
Smoothly transition documents designed for print publishing to XML. Discover how logical elements, attributes, and hierarchy make for easier print (and PDF) publishing with the structure in XML.
Also available in: Vietnamese  
Articles 28 Oct 2008
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