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Finite state machines in JavaScript, Part 1: Design a widget
Finite state machines were long used as an organizing principle for designing and implementing complex behavior in event-driven programs, such as network adapters and compilers. Now, programmable Web browsers open a new event-driven environment to a new generation of applications. Browser-based applications, popularized by Ajax, are becoming more complex. Designers and implementers benefit from the discipline and structure that finite state machines offer. In this article you, learn how to use a finite state machine to design complex behavior for a simple Web widget -- an animated tooltip that fades into and out of view.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 09 Jan 2007
Finite state machines in JavaScript, Part 3: Test the widget
In this series you learn how to use a finite state machine to methodically design complex behavior for a simple Web widget -- an animated tooltip that fades into and out of view. The resulting code is compact and concise, its logic is transparent, and its animation performs smoothly even on heavily loaded processors. In this article, learn how to deal with practical issues to make the implementation work in all popular Web browsers, and wrap things up. Part 1 showed how to use a finite state machine to methodically design complex behavior for a simple Web widget. Part 2 described how to implement that behavior in JavaScript, and take full advantage of its distinctive language features, including associative arrays and function closures.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 13 Mar 2007
Finite state machines in JavaScript, Part 2: Implement a widget
Part 1 of this series illustrated how to use a finite state machine to methodically design complex behavior for a simple Web widget -- an animated tooltip that fades into and out of view. In this article, you learn to implement that behavior in JavaScript and take full advantage of its distinctive language features, including associative arrays and function closures. The resulting code is compact and concise, its logic is transparent, and its animation performs smoothly even on heavily loaded processors. Part 3 will cover the practical issues of making the implementation work in all popular Web browsers.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 13 Feb 2007
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