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Writing DLLs for Linux apps
Plugins and DLLs are often a great way to add functionality without writing a whole new application. In Linux, plugins and DLLs are implemented as dynamic libraries. e-business consultant and architect Allen Wilson introduces dynamic libraries and shows you how to use them to change an application after the app is running.
Articles 01 Oct 2001
Wrap GObjects in Python
Learning how to wrap GTK+ C modules for use in Python will enable you to use a C-coded GObject in Python whenever you like, whether or not you're especially proficient in C.
Also available in: Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 15 Nov 2012
Worry-free Linux power-downs with Anacron
Linux ordinarily uses Cron to automatically perform routine system maintenance, such as rotating log files and updating spam filtering rules. This works well for servers and other systems that are powered on 24/7. If, however, you want to save power by shutting off the computer when it's not in use, as is common for desktop and laptop systems, Cron can't run. Not running Cron routinely can result in monstrously large log files and other problems. The Anacron utility provides a solution, enabling the computer to run regular maintenance jobs whenever the computer is powered on, even if those times are unpredictable.
Articles 21 Apr 2008
Work the CIM event model efficiently
In the Common Information Model (CIM), a client application can subscribe to be notified of CIM events. Normally, an application can create event filters with multiple event handlers through different connection ports, but this consumes lots of network resources and adds much complexity when it comes to maintenance. In this article, see how to register multiple CIM event handlers with a single specific connection port. Also pick up some tips on how to write code with the SBLIM CIM client library.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 20 Aug 2008
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 9. Installing software
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this final part, we download and compile a software package, discuss the pros and cons of automated package management, and get to know the RPM system.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 8. Backup and recovery
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, we take stock of what is on the system, and plan and implement regular backups with an eye to recovery as well as security.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 7. Networking
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, we explore networking, which is one of the things that Linux does best.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 6. Working with partitions and file systems
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, we explore Linux's hierarchical directory structure, and investigate mounting and devices.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 5. Linux logging
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, we track, manipulate, and rotate logs for security and informational purposes.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 3. Introduction to Webmin
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, he shows you how to install and use Webmin, a browser-based administration tool for Linux and other platforms that provides a graphical interface to many administrative and operational tasks.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 2. Console crash course
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, we cover the different shells, as well as some of the most essential Linux commands.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 1. Thinking in Linux
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. He begins by illustrating some of the differences and similarities between Linux and Windows, and showing you how to stop rebooting all the time.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Overview
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Part 4. User administration
IBM e-business architect Chris Walden is your guide through a nine-part developerWorks series on moving your operational skills from a Windows to a Linux environment. He covers everything from logging to networking, and from the command-line to help systems -- even compiling packages from available source code. In this part, you learn how to add and delete users and groups, both via the Webmin interface and at the command line. Shadow password and group files are also covered.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 11 Nov 2003
Vulnerability scanning of Docker images on OpenPOWER systems
This article explains how to configure and set up Clair vulnerability scanner for Docker images on OpenPOWER servers.
Articles 21 Dec 2016
vStorm Enterprise integrated with Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) running on IBM Power Systems
Veristorm vStorm Enterprise makes data migration to Hadoop environments flexible, secure and easy. vStorm already supports data movement to Hadoop solutions running on Linux on IBM Power Systems. Read this article for details about how vStorm was tested to integrate with and move data specifically to Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) on IBM POWER8.
Articles 08 Dec 2017
Virtualize the IBM DB2 pureScale Feature on Linux using Kernel-based Virtual Machine
Learn how you can improve your return on investment when you deploy the IBM DB2 pureScale Feature with Linux on IBM System x servers. Modern System x servers have an ample number of cores and amount of memory and I/O capability. By using virtualization technology, you can deploy multiple DB2 pureScale instances on a common infrastructure and achieve greater efficiency.
Also available in: Chinese   Portuguese  
Articles 25 Oct 2012
Virtual appliances and the Open Virtualization Format
Not only has virtualization advanced the state of the art in maximizing server efficiency, it has also opened the door to new technologies that were not possible before. One of these technologies is the virtual appliance, which fundamentally changes the way software is delivered, configured, and managed. But the power behind virtual appliances lies in the ability to freely share them among different hypervisors. Learn the ideas and benefits behind virtual appliances, and discover a standard solution for virtual appliance interoperability called the Open Virtualization Format.
Also available in: Portuguese  
Articles 20 Oct 2009
Version control for Linux
Version control systems, or source management systems, are an important aspect of modern software development. Not using one is like driving a car too fast: it's fun and you might get to your destination faster, but an accident is inevitable. This article provides an overview of Software Configuration Management (SCM) systems and their benefits, including CVS, Subversion, Arch, and Git. It also reviews the most common SCM architectures. Finally, it explores some of the new approaches that are available and how they differ from the earlier methods. [Listing 4 has been updated to reflect improvements to Git's syntax. -Ed.]
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 16 Oct 2006
vCPU hotplug and hotunplug using libvirt v2
This article talks about how to perform a virtual processor (vCPU) hotplug/hotunplug operation using libvirt version 2 in a PPC64LE environment.
Articles 20 Feb 2017
Using the GNU text utilities
This introductory- to intermediate-level tutorial introduces the GNU text utilities and shows how to use them for processing log files, documentation, structured text databases, and other textual sources of data or content.
Tutorial 09 Mar 2004
Using N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) with kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) guests on IBM Power servers
This article provides the basic steps to use N-Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) technology in a kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) guest. Additionally, the article also provides the significance of NPIV allowing multiple guests to make use of a single physical host bus adapter (HBA) to access multiple storage devices.
Articles 08 Jan 2018
Using Linux in a Windows world
Linux is the operating system of choice for most servers on the Internet and is growing in popularity as a desktop operating system. However, simply migrating to Linux on your desktop doesn't guarantee that you can still interact with all of the enterprise resources that your job or interests may require. This article discusses additional configuration tasks that you may need to undertake to interact with legacy Microsoft Windows files and file servers and use new network hardware from your desktop Linux system.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 03 Apr 2013
Using inline assembly with IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on z Systems, Part 4: Advanced features
The objective of this article is to discuss the advanced features of inline assembly supported by IBM XL compiler for Linux on z Systems. The target audience is software engineers who are interested in going beyond the extent of the optimizations provided by the compiler to fine tune the most performance-sensitive code section of their applications.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 12 Aug 2015
Using inline assembly with IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on z Systems, Part 3: Basic features
Inline assembly allows software engineers to handcraft the assembler codes for the most performance-sensitive parts of their programs. This feature unleashes the hardware advantage of IBM z Systems as well as programmer ingenuity to realize the development of high-performance applications. The objective of this article is to discuss the basics of inline assembly feature supported by IBM compiler for Linux on z Systems.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 12 Aug 2015
Using inline assembly with IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on z Systems, Part 1: Primer
IBM® XL C/C++ compiler Version 1 for Linux on z Systems was released in 2015. This marked the first time inline assembly feature was supported by IBM compiler for Linux on z Systems. With inline assembly, software engineers are able to further accelerate the execution of applications by handcrafting the assembler codes for the most performance-sensitive parts. This feature unleashes the hardware advantage of IBM z Systems™ as well as programmer ingenuity to realize the development of high-performance applications. The objective of this article is to introduce the assembler instructions on z Systems to be used with inline assembly. The target audience are advanced software engineers who are interested in going beyond the extent of the optimizations provided by the compiler to fine tune the most performance-sensitive code section of high-performance applications on z Systems.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 17 Jun 2015
Using inline assembly with IBM XL C/C++ compiler for Linux on z Systems, Part 2: Accelerate performance
Using the Fibonacci sequence computation as an example, this article analyzes the speed advantage of an inline assembly implementation in comparison to the performance of other programming techniques such as the recursive algorithm, the dynamic programming implementation, the iterative approach, and the optimized matrix power algorithm. The target audience is software engineers interested in further accelerating the execution of their applications by handcrafting the assembler codes for the most performance-critical sections.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 28 Oct 2015
Using HTML forms with PHP
One of the advantages of PHP has always been the ability to easily manipulate information submitted by the user through an HTML form. In fact, PHP version 4.1 adds several new ways to access this information and effectively removes the one most commonly used in previous versions. This article looks at different ways to use the information submitted on an HTML form, in both older and more recent versions of PHP. It starts out by looking at individual values and builds to a page that can generically access any available form values.
Articles 01 Aug 2002
Using Docker Swarm mode on OpenPOWER servers
This article explains how to set up a Docker swarm cluster using the newly introduced Swarm mode feature of Docker Engine.
Articles 21 Dec 2016
Using docker containers networks
To build web applications that act in concert securely, use the docker networks feature. Networks, by definition, provide complete isolation for containers. Hence, it is important to have control on the networks that your applications run on. Docker container networks give you that control. The following article describes describes the type of networks that the docker engine creates by default and shows you how to create your own, user-defined networks.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 03 Aug 2016
Using Bash shell scripts for function testing
Function testing is a critical part of software development -- and Bash, which is already loaded in Linux and ready to go, can help you do it quickly and easily. In this article, Angel Rivera explains how to use Bash shell scripts to perform function testing of Linux applications that use line commands. The scripts rely on the return code of the line commands, so you will not be able to use this approach for GUI applications.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 01 Mar 2001
Using advanced widgets in Perl/Tk
Perl is one of the most popular languages out there, and is used for everything from mission-critical projects to Web applications to "glue." It is not, however, often used for GUI programming and prototyping. Philipp K. Janert thinks it should be, and you probably will too -- after this look at some of the more complex widgets available for Perl/Tk.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 10 Aug 2004
Use the Integrated Virtualization Manager with Linux on POWER
The IBM Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM) is a new component of the Virtual I/O Server, which is included with the Advanced Power Virtualization feature. With the use of IVM, customers can now manage partitions on an IBM POWER5 server without a Hardware Management Console (HMC). This paper presents an overview of the functionality of IVM, lists some of the differences between the IVM and the HMC, and illustrates how to use IVM to create and manage Linux on POWER partitions.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 15 Nov 2005
Use Software Defined Networking to optimize your IaaS
Explore Software Defined Networking (SDN) network management via software abstraction layers as a method to enhance and optimize your Infrastructure as a Service in the areas of interoperability, user and provider expectation management, developer and administrator requirements, and effective risk mitigation.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 24 Jun 2014
Use reentrant functions for safer signal handling
If you deal with concurrent access of functions, either by threads or processes, you can face problems caused by non-reentrancy of the functions. In this article, learn through code samples how anomalies can result if reentrancy is not ensured, especially with regard to signals. Five recommended programming practices are included, along with a discussion of a proposed compiler model in which the compiler front end deals with reentrancy.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 20 Jan 2005
Use PLAM to speed distributed transactions
To decrease transaction time in distributed client-server applications, you can refine the flow of authorization information between the entities involved in a transaction. In this article, learn how to reduce the redundant authorization information that travels between a client and server with the Pluggable Authorization Module. PLAM is a DCE-style authorization framework model that reduces the request come-back period.
Articles 18 May 2005
Updating from SuSE Linux Enterprise Server V8 to V9
If you are already running SLES 8, you may be able to run an update to SLES 9 rather than re-installing from scratch. This article examines the update process and gives you suggestions on how to make an update successful.
Articles 21 Sep 2004
UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 4: Some nifty shell tricks
When writing a shell program, you often come across some special situation that you'd like to handle automatically. This tutorial includes examples of such situations from small Bourne shell scripts. These situations include base conversion from one string to another (decimal to hex, hex to decimal, decimal to octal, and so on), reading the keyboard while in a piped loop, subshell execution, inline input, executing a command once for each file in a directory, and multiple ways to construct a continuous loop. Part 4 of this series wraps up with a collection of shell one-liners that perform useful functions.
Also available in: Chinese  
Tutorial 20 Feb 2007
UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 3: Introducing filters and regular expressions
Discover the power of UNIX(R) filters. In this tutorial, you'll learn about the grep family in depth, including the syntax of regular expressions in many UNIX utilities. You'll also find out more about the stream editor, sed, as well as examine the awk pattern scanning language through examples and explanations.
Also available in: Chinese  
Tutorial 12 May 2006
UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 1: File maintenance tools
Systems administrators can use a number of programs to maintain files in a UNIX(R) system from the command line. In this tutorial, you'll experiment with commands, such as cd, cp, and tar, to navigate a UNIX file system from the command line and work with files and directories. The cd command changes directories, cp duplicates files or directories, and tar quickly groups files into an archive. You'll also learn how to deal with file permissions and perform simple input/output.
Also available in: Chinese  
Tutorial 26 Sep 2006
Understand Representational State Transfer (REST) in Ruby
REST, or Representational State Transfer, is a distributed communication architecture that is quickly becoming the lingua franca for clouds. It's simple, yet expressive enough to represent the plethora of cloud resources and overall configuration and management. Learn how to develop a simple REST agent from the ground up in Ruby to learn its implementation and use.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 17 Aug 2012
Tuning guide for MongoDB on IBM Power Systems
This tuning guide will help you achieve optimal performance when running MongoDB on IBM Power Systems by providing guidelines for system-level, virtualization-level and application-level tuning.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 24 Jun 2016
Trigger keyboard and mouse actions with your voice and xdotool
xdotool is a helpful library of instructions that allows programmers to emulate keystrokes and mouse actions. The particular strength of the tool comes when the keyboard or mouse is absent or in accessibility situations where the user is not physically able to employ regular input methods. This article has two goals: first, to provide an introduction to the use of xdotool in a Linux desktop environment, and second, to use voice input to trigger actions typically done through hardware input. A concluding example uses XML to store xdotool-oriented code fragments for insertion into auto-generated dialog manager code.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 06 Sep 2011
Track KVM guests with libvirt and the Linux audit subsystem
Libvirt is an important tool for managing virtualized environments on Linux hosts. An audit trail of events that occur on the host during libvirt's execution is often necessary for monitoring, compliance, forensics, and other purposes. This article describes how to use the Linux audit subsystem on the host to track operations performed by libvirt and how to correlate the events with other host events to provide a consistent and comprehensive view of changes performed through libvirt.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 05 Jun 2012
Track bugs with Bugzilla on Linux
For those in the support arena, keeping track of issues, problems, and the fixes applied to them can be a daunting task; however, there is a perfect open source answer to this challenge: Bugzilla. Once it is installed, you can easily track bugs and be notified when certain issues and solutions are discovered. This article provides a step-by-step guide for installing Bugzilla on a Linux system.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 18 Mar 2005
Tip: Remove duplicate lines with uniq
Duplicate lines don't often cause a problem, but sometimes they really do. And when they do, there's little need to spend an afternoon working up a filter for them, when the uniq command is at your very fingertips. Find out how it can save you time and headaches.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 03 Apr 2003
Tip: Prompt magic
Why stick with the standard boring shell prompt when you can easily make it colorful and more informative? In this tip, Daniel Robbins will show you how to get your shell prompt just the way you like it, as well as how to dynamically update your X terminal's title bar.
Also available in: Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 01 Sep 2000
Tip: Concatenating files with cat
In our continuing series on GNU text utilities, Jacek Artymiak takes a look at cat -- the command that UNIX lovers love to love, and UNIX haters love to hate.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 01 Oct 2002
Three ways to recycle commodity hardware with Linux
Outdated computer hardware may be too old to rely on, but it represents a value to your organization -- whether in an office or at home. Discover how you can realize that value by repurposing older machines with Linux.
Also available in: Russian   Portuguese  
Articles 22 Aug 2009
The making of MetroSphere, Part 10: Installing WebSphere Portal on Red Hat Linux: DB2 and IDS
This tutorial is the first half of a comprehensive overview of installing IBM WebSphere Portal 4.2 in a two-tier Red Hat Linux environment. The first tier is the LDAP server used for user authentication and single-sign-on capabilities, which is covered in this tutorial. The second tier is the Portal Server itself, which is covered in Part 11 of this series. With both parts, all facets of the installation are covered including component installation, configuration, and verification.
Tutorial 19 May 2003
The art of metaprogramming, Part 1: Introduction to metaprogramming
One of the most under-used programming techniques is writing programs that generate programs or program parts. Learn why metaprogramming is necessary and look at some of the components of metaprogramming (textual macro languages, specialized code generators). See how to build a code generator and get a closer look at language-sensitive macro programming in Scheme.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 20 Oct 2005
Thanks for the memory, Linux
Running out of Java heap isn't the only cause of a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError. If native memory runs out, OutOfMemoryErrors that your normal debugging techniques won't be able to solve can occur. This article explains what native memory is, how the Java runtime uses it, what running out of it looks like, and how to debug a native OutOfMemoryError on Windows and Linux. A companion article covers the same topics for AIX systems.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian  
Articles 21 Apr 2009
TASK_KILLABLE: New process state in Linux
Linux kernel 2.6.25 introduced a new process state for putting processes to sleep called TASK_KILLABLE, which offers an alternative to the efficient but potentially unkillable TASK_UNINTERRUPTIBLE and the easy-to-awaken but safer TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE. TASK_KILLABLE is the outcome of an issue raised in 2002 about the OpenAFS file system driver waiting for an event interruptibly after blocking all signals. This new sleeping state echoes TASK_UNINTERRUPTIBLE with the ability to respond to fatal signals. In this article, the author sheds light on this area and, using examples from 2.6.26 and an earlier version, 2.6.18, discusses the related changes to the Linux kernel and the new APIs that resulted from these changes.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 30 Sep 2008
Targeting your applications – what little endian and big endian IBM XL Fortran compiler differences mean to you
The IBM® POWER8™ platform supports operating systems that use big endian or little endian byte ordering. Migrating programs written for a big endian operating system to a little endian operating system may require code changes to maintain program behaviour or results. There are differences that need to be considered with regards to vectors, storage association between items of different sizes, 16-byte reals, complex numbers, and unformatted data files. The application binary interface (ABI) implemented in IBM XL Fortran for little endian Linux on Power Systems is different than the ABI implemented in the big endian distributions. New options and intrinsic procedures have been added to help with porting. This article describes these differences, new options, and intrinsic procedures and makes suggestions about code changes to port code to IBM XL Fortran on POWER8.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian  
Articles 12 Dec 2014
Targeting your applications - what little endian and big endian IBM XL C/C++ compiler differences mean to you
The IBM® POWER8™ platform supports operating systems that use big endian or little endian byte ordering. Migrating programs written for a big endian operating system to a little endian operating system may require code changes to maintain program behaviour or results. There are differences that need to be considered with regards to vectors, storage association between items of different sizes, long doubles, complex numbers, and serialization. The application binary interface (ABI) implemented in IBM XL C/C++ for little endian Linux on Power Systems is different than the ABI implemented in the big endian distributions. New options and built-in functions have been added to help with porting. This article describes these differences, new options, and built-in functions and makes suggestions about code changes to port code to IBM XL C/C++ on POWER8.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian  
Articles 12 Dec 2014
Take charge of processor affinity
Knowing a little bit about how the Linux 2.6 scheduler treats CPU affinity can help you design better userspace applications. Soft affinity means that processes do not frequently migrate between processors, whereas hard affinity means that processes run on processors you specify. This article describes current affinity mechanisms, explains why and how to use hard affinity, and provides sample code showing you how to use the available functionality.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 29 Sep 2005
Tableau integrated with Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) running on IBM Power Systems
Tableau is a business intelligence tool that allows data to be discovered and visualized. Tableau supports Hadoop environments as a data source. Read this article for details about how Tableau Desktop was tested to integrate with and visualize data in Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) on IBM POWER8.
Articles 09 Dec 2017
Support multiple keyboard layouts in web-based VNC apps
Take advantage of a recently introduced browser API (available in Chrome, Firefox, and Opera) to add support for multiple keyboard layouts to web-based VNC clients.
Tutorial 23 Aug 2016
SSL secures VNC applications
SSL provides a novel mechanism for convenient, secure access of remote desktops with VNC and standard Web browsers.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian  
Articles 24 Jan 2007
Speaking UNIX: The Squirrel portable shell and scripting language
If you don't want to commit to the idiosyncrasies of a specific shell running on a particular platform, try the Squirrel Shell. The Squirrel Shell provides an advanced, object-oriented scripting language that works equally well on UNIX, Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows systems. Write a script once, and run it anywhere.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 17 Mar 2009
Speaking UNIX: The new and improved Vim editor
If you've worked on IBM AIX, another flavor of UNIX, or Linux, you've more than likely used the vi editor. Since its conception in 1976, vi has become a staple for anyone wanting to edit files. How could someone make a more powerful editing tool than vi, you may ask? The answer is Vim, and this article provides details on the many enhancements that have made Vim a highly used and acceptable editor in the world of UNIX and Linux.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian  
Articles 19 Aug 2008
Speaking UNIX: Get to know Ksplice
Ksplice applies kernel patches on-the-fly - no reboot required - in a fraction of a second. Here's a hands-on guide to performing painless system updates.
Also available in: Chinese   Portuguese  
Articles 27 Jul 2010
SolarNetOne: Solar-powered networking for anyone
In many parts of the world, the power grid is shoddy, computers are scarce, and connectivity is even rarer. Thus, as with many other modern practices and technologies, populations are increasingly split into the "computing haves" and the "computing have-nots." But many are addressing the divide. SolarNetOne is a turnkey Internet hotspot -- power, computers, and satellite uplink -- that you can install virtually anywhere, for less than the cost of a subcompact car.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 30 Jun 2009
Software optimization techniques for PowerPC 405 and 440
Your article abstract goes here. Summarize the main points of the article or the task the developer will be able to do after reading the article. Put the primary points and key phrases close to the beginning of the abstract, because it may be truncated in search results. Avoid line breaks in the abstract, please.
Articles 10 Feb 2005
SNMP-based monitoring for GPFS clusters
New in version 3.2, IBM General Parallel File System (GPFS) on Linux provides Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) services that let administrators collect SNMP data about the health of a GPFS cluster so that problems such as disk failure can be quickly identified. The system lets a collector node gather the trap information, which an administrator can then monitor and analyze remotely on a separate management node. This article provides a method for basic verification of SNMP in a GPFS cluster.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 29 Jan 2008
Smashing performance with OProfile
Analyzing the performance of the Linux operating system and application code can be difficult due to unexpected interactions between the hardware and the software, but profiling is one way you can identify such performance problems. This article looks at OProfile, a profiling tool for Linux that will be included in the upcoming stable kernel.
Articles 16 Oct 2003
Six ways to write more comprehensible code
As a developer, time is your most valuable resource. These six tips on how to write maintainable code are guaranteed to save you time and frustration: one minute spent writing comments can save you an hour of anguish.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 29 May 2007
Sharing computers on a Linux (or heterogeneous) network, Part 1
In the first of this pair of articles, David compares and contrasts Secure shell (SSH) and Virtual Network Computing (VNC), two technologies that allow a user at one workstation to run an application that lives on another computer. (He does not cover file-and-print sharing or "Internet" services like httpd, ftpd, smtp, or nntpd, even though these technologies also usefully "share" something about the computers in question.) He does, however, give tips on installing and configuring SSH and VNC, and comments on tool stability, choices, and licensing status.
Articles 01 Dec 2001
Shared objects for the object disoriented!
Ashish Bansal tells you how to write dynamically loadable libraries and suggests tools you want to use in the process. He reviews the compilation process and naming conventions, and then walks you through writing, compiling, and installing a shared library.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 01 Apr 2001
Setting up Apache OpenWhisk on IBM Power on a single-node, on-premises serverless framework
OpenWhisk has significantly gained popularity as the cloud-first distributed event-based programming service. In this article, we discuss about the enablement of OpenWhisk for IBM Power servers. It also provides the configurations needed to start an OpenWhisk cluster in an all-in-one Ubuntu cluster running on IBM Power Architecture.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 30 Aug 2017
Set up DB2 Enterprise 9 on a Linux virtual machine using VMware ESX Server
Walk through the steps for setting up a virtual machine for DB2 9 on Linux, using VMware ESX Server 3.0.1.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 08 Mar 2007
Server clinic: Put virtual filesystems to work
A virtual filesystem (VFS) is an abstraction with surprisingly productive uses. Several popular languages now support VFS constructs, and Cameron Laird shows you what they are good for.
Articles 29 Apr 2003
Secure Web site access with Perl
With Perl modules, automate the login procedures on secure Web sites.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 25 Apr 2006
Secure programmer: Validating input
This article shows how to validate input -- one of the first lines of defense in any secure program.
Articles 23 Oct 2003
Secure programmer: Minimizing privileges
Secure programs must minimize privileges so that any bugs are less likely to be become security vulnerabilities. This article discusses how to minimize privileges by minimizing the privileged modules, the privileges granted, and the time the privileges are active. The article discusses not only some of the traditional UNIX-like mechanisms for privileges, but some of the newer mechanisms like the FreeBSD jail(), the Linux Security Modules (LSM) framework, and Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux).
Articles 20 May 2004
Secure Linux: Part 1. SELinux – history of its development, architecture and operating principles
Learn about the basic milestones in the development, architecture, and operating principles of Security-Enhanced Linux, the powerful remix of Linux providing mandatory access control. This article was specially selected for translation by developerWorks Russia as an example of developerWorks world-wide offerings.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 30 May 2012
Secure Linux containers cookbook
Lightweight containers, otherwise known as Virtual Private Servers (VPS) or Jails, are often thought of as a security tools designed to confine untrusted applications or users. However, as presently constructed, these containers do not provide adequate security guarantees. By strengthening these containers using SELinux or Smack policy, a much more secure container can be implemented in Linux. This article shows you how to create a more secure Linux-Security-Modules-protected container. Both the SELinux and Smack policy are considered works in progress, to be improved upon with help from their respective communities.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese  
Articles 03 Feb 2009
Second Life client, Part 3: Adding simple translation to Second Life
In the last part of our exploration of the Second Life software, learn how to plug a simple command-line program into Second Life that provides a language translation function.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 30 Apr 2007
Scripting with Guile
Scheme is a programming language, but Guile -- an interpreter and library for Scheme -- transforms it into an embedded scripting language, making it ideal for bringing dynamic new life to your static applications. Take a quick tour of Guile, and discover its powerful features for building extensible applications.
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Articles 20 Jan 2009
Scripting the Linux desktop, Part 2: Scripting Nautilus
This series of articles explores how to use Python to create scripts for the GNOME desktop, the screenlets framework, and Nautilus to deliver a highly productive environment. Scripts on the desktop enable drag-and-drop functionality and quick access to the information and services you commonly use. In this installment, learn how to use Python to add functionality to extend Nautilus on your desktop.
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Articles 16 Feb 2011
Scripting the Linux desktop, Part 1: Basics
This series of articles explores how to use Python to create scripts for the GNOME desktop, the screenlets framework, and Nautilus to deliver a highly productive environment. Scripts on the desktop enable drag-and-drop functionality and quick access to the information and services you commonly use. In this installment, learn how to build a desktop application using the screenlets widget toolkit.
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Articles 18 Jan 2011
Scripting KVM with Python, Part 2: Add a GUI to manage KVM with libvirt and Python
Further explore how to use Python to create scripts for managing virtual machines using KVM. Learn how to add a GUI to expand on the simple status and display tool.
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Articles 17 Jan 2012
Scale your file system with Parallel NFS
The Network File System (NFS) is a stalwart component of most modern local area networks (LANs). But NFS is inadequate for the demanding input- and output-intensive applications commonly found in high-performance computing -- or, at least it was. The newest revision of the NFS standard includes Parallel NFS (pNFS), a parallelized implementation of file sharing that multiplies transfer rates by orders of magnitude. Here's a primer. [Note: The article has been updated with regard to vendor involvement in the origin and development of pNFS -- Ed.]
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Articles 26 Nov 2008
SAS software with Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) running on IBM POWER8
This article describes how to set up an environment where SAS can access and analyze data stored on Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) using SAS/ACCESS Interface to Hadoop. The environment is running on IBM POWER8 processor-based servers.
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Articles 06 Jul 2017
SAP HANA and Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) integration with SAP HANA Spark Controller running on IBM Power Systems
This article describes how to set up an environment where SAP HANA accesses and analyzes data stored in Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) using the SAP HANA Spark Controller. The environment is running entirely on IBM POWER8 processor-based servers. This article describes two deployment options that use either scale-up or scale-out POWER8 servers.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 30 Aug 2017
SAN switch performance monitoring using IBM Network Advisor
This tutorial explains the steps for the installation and configuration of IBM Network Advisor 12.1.5 on RHEL 6 to manage storage area network (SAN) switches running OS 7.x.x.
Also available in: Chinese  
Tutorial 29 May 2014
Run ZFS on Linux
Although ZFS exists in an operating system whose future is at risk, it is easily one of the most advanced, feature-rich file systems in existence. It incorporates variable block sizes, compression, encryption, de-duplication, snapshots, clones, and (as the name implies) support for massive capacities. Get to know the concepts behind ZFS and learn how you can use ZFS today on Linux using Filesystem in Userspace (FUSE).
Articles 19 Jan 2011
Role-based access control in SELinux
Role-based access control (RBAC) is a general security model that simplifies administration by assigning roles to users and then assigning permissions to those roles. RBAC in Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) acts as a layer of abstraction between the user and the underlying type-enforcement (TE) model, which provides highly granular access control but is not geared for ease of management. Learn how the three pieces of an SELinux context (policy, kernel, and userspace) work together to enforce the RBAC and tie Linux users into the TE policy.
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Articles 13 Feb 2008
Rexx for everyone
Rexx occupies a useful ecological niche between the relative crudeness of shell scripting and the cumbersome formality of full systems languages. Many Linux programmers and systems administrators would benefit from adding a Rexx implementation to their collection of go-to tools.
Articles 04 Feb 2004
Repair cloud virtual machine cloning errors
External data provisioning requirements such as network configurations like IP addresses can cause problems when cloning a virtual machine to use in a new environment. If the external data is not available during the process, the reconfiguration of the VM will likely be incomplete. The authors offer a way to handle this problem, even without much knowledge of the application or without a form of activation scripting to help. Runtime Image Activation (RIA) is a prototype command-line interface that lets you orchestrate networking techniques to make sure your cloned VMs are appropriately configured.
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Articles 20 Feb 2012
Reduce your Linux memory footprint
A lack of physical memory can severely hamper Linux performance. In this article, learn how to accurately measure the amount of memory your Linux system uses. You also get practical advice on reducing your memory requirements using an Ubuntu system as an example.
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Articles 31 Jan 2007
Reduce Linux power consumption, Part 3: Tuning results
This three-part series is your starting point for tuning your system for power efficiency. In Part 3, the author compares the performance of the five in-kernel governors in both tuned and untuned states to show you how to optimize a Linux-based System x server.
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Articles 07 Oct 2009
Reduce Linux power consumption, Part 2: General and governor-specific settings
This three-part series is your starting point for tuning your system for power efficiency. In Part 2, follow a step-by-step guide on the general settings of the Linux CPUfreq subsystem and get more details on the five in-kernel governors -- performance, powersave, userspace, ondemand, and conservative -- and their settings.
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Articles 23 Sep 2009
Red Hat Virtualization (RHV) environment on IBM Power Systems
This article describes how to install and configure RHV components based on RHEL 7.3 LE, on an IBM POWER8 host.
Articles 13 Feb 2017
Recover from a failed Linux boot
If your Linux computer fails to boot after a kernel upgrade, disk swap, or other system change, you're not helpless. The Grand Unified Bootloader (GRUB) gives you ways to control the boot process and recover. Or, if necessary, emergency boot disks that you create with an external tool can come to the rescue. Learn procedures and GRUB commands that can help you boot in problem situations, and find out about a life-saving external tool for BIOS-based systems.
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Articles 22 Oct 2013
Quick start guide to Apache Bigtop v1.1 on IBM SoftLayer OpenPOWER with Ubuntu 14.04
This article outlines the process of installing the Apache Hadoop and Spark Bigtop v1.1.0 bundle on an IBM® SoftLayer® POWER8® bare metal server running Ubuntu 14.04. Apache Zeppelin notebook is included in the bundled installation script to run an initial benchmark suite.
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Articles 01 Jun 2016
Quantum computing for everyone, a programmer’s perspective
About a week ago, IBM launched Quantum Experience. The cornerstone of this initiative is to make a real, working quantum computer available for anyone. This blog discusses Quantum Experience, gives the basics while trying to dwell as little as possible on Algebra or Physics and, at the end, we’ll build a simple algorithm and discuss the results.
Blog 21 Feb 2017
QlikView integrated with Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) running on IBM Power Systems
QlikView is a business intelligence tool that allows data to be discovered and visualized. QlikView supports Hadoop environments as a data source. Read this article for details about how QlikView was tested to integrate with and visualize data in Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) on IBM POWER8.
Articles 10 Dec 2017
Python persistence management
Persistence is all about keeping objects around, even between executions of a program. In this article you'll get a general understanding of various persistence mechanisms for Python objects, from relational databases to Python pickles and beyond. You'll also take an in-depth look at Python's object serialization capabilities.
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Articles 01 Nov 2002
Putting Linux reliability to the test
This article documents the test results and analysis of the Linux kernel and other core OS components, including everything from libraries and device drivers to file systems and networking, all under some fairly adverse conditions, and over lengthy durations. The IBM Linux Technology Center has just finished this comprehensive testing over a period of more than three months and shares the results of their LTP (Linux Test Project) testing with developerWorks readers.
Articles 17 Dec 2003
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