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5 things you didn't know about ...: Apache Maven
You might be familiar with profiles, but did you know that you can use them in Maven to execute specific behaviors in different environments? This installment in the 5 things series looks beyond Maven's build features, and even its basic tools for managing the project life cycle, delivering five tips that will improve the productivity and ease with which you manage applications in Maven.
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: JARs
Many Java developers never think beyond the basics of JARs -- only using them to bundle classes before shipping them off to the production servers. But a JAR is more than just a renamed ZIP file. Learn how to use Java Archive files at their fullest capacity, including tips for jarring Spring dependencies and configuration files.
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: Java performance monitoring, Part 2
If it's news to you that the JDK ships with the full-featured profiler JConsole, you'll be even more surprised to learn about the five stand-alone profiling utilities introduced in this article. Find out how lightweight (and in some cases experimental) Java process monitoring and analysis tools can help you hone in on performance bottlenecks like thread starvation, deadlocks, and object leaks.
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: Java performance monitoring, Part 1
Blaming bad code (or bad code monkeys) won't help you find performance bottlenecks and improve the speed of your Java applications, and neither will guessing. Ted Neward directs your attention to tools for Java performance monitoring, starting with five tips for using Java's built-in profiler, JConsole, to collect and analyze performance data.
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: java.util.concurrent, Part 1
Writing multithreaded code that both performs well and protects applications against corruption is just plain hard -- which is why we have java.util.concurrent. Ted Neward shows you how concurrent Collections classes like CopyOnWriteArrayList, BlockingQueue, and ConcurrentMap retrofit standard Collections classes for your concurrency programming needs.>
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: java.util.concurrent, Part 2
In addition to concurrency-friendly Collections, java.util.concurrent introduced other pre-built components that can assist you in regulating and executing threads in multithreaded applications. Ted Neward introduces five more of his Java programming must-haves from the java.util.concurrent package.
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: Multithreaded Java programming
Multithreaded programming is never easy, but it does help to understand how the JVM processes subtly different code constructs. Steven Haines shares five tips that will help you make more informed decisions when working with synchronized methods, volatile variables, and atomic classes.
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Articles 17 May 2017
5 things you didn't know about ...: The Java 6 Collections API, Part 1
The Java 6 Collections API is far more than a replacement for arrays, though that's not a bad place to start. Ted Neward dispenses five tips for doing more with Collections, including a primer on customizing and extending the Java Collections API.
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Articles 17 May 2017
A Java actor library for parallel execution
Actors aren't supported on the Java platform, but there are still plenty of ways to use them in your Java programs. Barry Feigenbaum returns to developerWorks with μJavaActors, a lightweight actor library for highly parallel execution on the Java platform.
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Articles 30 May 2012
A JSTL primer, Part 1: The expression language
In this article, software engineer Mark Kolb shows you how to use the JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL) to avoid using scripting elements in your JSP pages. You'll learn how to simplify software maintenance by removing source code from the presentation layer. And you'll learn about JSTL's simplified expression language.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 11 Feb 2003
A JSTL primer, Part 2: Getting down to the core
Mark Kolb continues his exploration into the JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL) and the core library with a look at tags to assist with flow control and URL management.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 18 Mar 2003
A JSTL primer, Part 4: Accessing SQL and XML content
A hallmark of Web-based applications is the integration of multiple subsystems. Two of the most common mechanisms for exchanging data between such subsystems are SQL and XML. In this article, Mark Kolb concludes his coverage of JSTL with an introduction to the sql and xml libraries for accessing database and XML content in JSP pages.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 20 May 2003
Accelerate Hibernate and iBATIS applications using pureQuery, Part 3: Auto-tune data fetch strategies in Hibernate applications with pureQuery
Development teams that build applications using Hibernate as the Object Relational Mapper (ORM) or persistence mechanism spend significant time tuning the amount of data that Hibernate fetches from the database, and the number of SQL queries that Hibernate uses in each business use-case of the application. In this article, learn how the IBM InfoSphere Optim pureQuery auto-tuning feature for Hibernate automates the process of determining these problems and automatically fixing them without intervention. Both the application development team and DBAs benefit from the solution.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 21 Oct 2011
Access z/OS batch jobs from Java
Java (TM) can provide a simple way to submit z/OS(R) batch jobs to run -- but that is just the beginning. You can also use Java, from any platform, to check on the status of your z/OS batch jobs. This article is a follow-on to developerWorks article, "Submit batch jobs from Java on z/OS."
Articles 19 Dec 2006
Accessing CORBA and Java RMI applications from WebSphere Message Broker V6.1
This article shows you how to access Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and Java Remote Method Invocation (RMI) applications from WebSphere Message Broker applications. It is intended for Message Broker application developers wanting to enrich their flows with data from CORBA and Java RMI applications. You should have an intermediate understanding of Java programming, CORBA, and RMI, as well as some experience developing Message Broker message flows using the JavaCompute node and SOAP nodes.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 04 Mar 2009
Accessing IBM Tivoli Directory Server through Handheld Devices
This article focuses on creating generic client API's using KSOAP (i.e. SOAP implementation on handheld devices) which are portable with the IBM Tivoli DSML server using which the IBM Tivoli Directory Server can be accessed.
Articles 20 May 2005
Accessing social networking Web sites through OAuth, Part 3: Deploy the Web Twitter client to Google App Engine
OAuth is an open protocol that lets users share their protected resources among different Web sites, without risking exposure of users' credentials. Part 1 of this series introduced OAuth and showed you how to develop an OAuth-enabled desktop Twitter client. In Part 2, you learned how to develop an OAuth-enabled Web Twitter client. In this final part of the series, you will deploy the Web application developed in Part 2 to the Google App Engine (GAE).
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Articles 13 Apr 2010
Add OmniFind search to Notes applications
This article shows how to add OmniFind search functionality to a conventional Lotus Notes database application accessed through the Notes client. More specifically, the reader will learn how to call IBM's Java Search and Indexing API (SIAPI) from within LotusScript. In addition to showing how to display search results as conventional text fields, this article also shows how search results can be displayed as HTML from within the Notes client, greatly improving the look and feel of the end user search interface.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 21 Jun 2007
Add your own rules to Rational Software Analyzer
IBM Rational Software Analyzer is a static analysis framework that detects a wide range of problems in source code, from issues with coding style to resource leaks and potential lack of null pointer references. Although this software features many different rules, it is impossible to cover everyone's static analysis needs. But by writing custom rules for Rational Software Analyzer, developers can catch almost any problem that the tool does not include. This article walks you through the process of creating a useful rule and demonstrates how to make it better.
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Articles 25 Mar 2010
Advanced DAO programming
J2EE developers use the Data Access Object (DAO) design pattern to separate low-level data access logic from high-level business logic. Implementing the DAO pattern involves more than just writing data access code. In this article, Java developer Sean C. Sullivan discusses three often overlooked aspects of DAO programming: transaction demarcation, exception handling, and logging.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 07 Oct 2003
Advanced Facelets programming
If you think internationalization is hard, think again! In this article, Richard Hightower follows up his immensely popular introduction to Facelets with more advanced ways to bridge the gap between Java Server Faces (JSF) and EL. Follow along as Rick shows you how to internationalize your Web pages easily, add custom logic tags to a composition component, and incorporate metaprogramming into your Facelets development.
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Articles 09 May 2006
Advanced Java view features in IBM Lotus Notes 8.5
Java™ views were introduced in the IBM® Lotus® Notes® client in release 8.0. Many new features were implemented through the Java views to modernize the Lotus Notes interface. After you have converted your application to use the Java view, you can follow the steps outlined in this article to take advantage of the new view features offered, such as threads, narrow mode, business cards, split action buttons, and custom context menus. This article presumes that you have an installed version of Lotus Notes 8.5, IBM Lotus Domino Designer 8.5, and the Lotus Notes 8.5 composite application editor. You should also be familiar with working in Lotus Domino® Designer.
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Articles 29 Jun 2009
Advanced Synth
Take an in-depth look at the Synth look and feel, the newest addition to Swing introduced in Java 5.0. Synth lets developers rapidly create and deploy custom looks for an application by introducing the concept of a "skin" to Java UI programming. Software Engineer Michael Abernethy takes you through Synth concepts step-by-step to build an application with a Synth look from scratch. After reading this article, you should be able to create professional-looking UIs in no time.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 01 Feb 2005
Agile DevOps: Continuous software delivery in the cloud
When developers and operations work together in a collaborative manner, they often need one place to manage the software delivery process and pipeline of changes. A Continuous Delivery (CD) platform addresses this need. In this Agile DevOps installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall lays out how you can use OpenDelivery, an open CD platform.
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Articles 08 Jan 2013
Agile DevOps: Infrastructure automation
How many times have you manually applied the same steps when creating an infrastructure, or relied on another team to set up an environment for you? What if all of these actions were scripted and versioned just like the rest of the software system? In this Agile DevOps installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall shows how Chef and Puppet enable you to automate infrastructure provisioning. He covers the basics of each of these tools -- along with their similarities, use cases, and differences -- and provides a video demo of scripting with Puppet.
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Articles 11 Sep 2012
Agile DevOps: Test-driven infrastructure
Few in the software industry question that writing automated tests for application code is a good practice. Teams are now applying similar automated testing practices to infrastructure and environments. In this Agile DevOps installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall covers writing automated tests for your infrastructure using tools such as Cucumber with Gherkin. These tests can be run in conjunction with every scripted change to the infrastructure to ensure quick feedback when a change introduces an error into an environment.
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Articles 06 Nov 2012
Agile DevOps: The flattening of the software release process
What does it mean to "flatten" your software release process? How will this affect your organizational structure? In the first installment of the Agile DevOps series, DevOps expert Paul Duvall describes how developers and operations are working together on software delivery teams to streamline the process of developing and releasing software. He discusses such nascent topics as test-driven infrastructures, transient environments, and the Chaos Monkey -- and how these techniques all work toward the goal of getting software to users more quickly and more often.
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Articles 23 Aug 2012
Agile DevOps: Transient environments
Often, after a shared environment is provisioned, it's never decommissioned and might run for weeks or months, with engineers applying manual configuration changes throughout its lifetime. This risky approach regularly causes deployment problems and other strange "environment" errors to occur during development, test, and production cycles. This Agile DevOps installment explains how to create ephemeral environments that are terminated on a frequent basis. Once all environments are scripted and versioned, these test environments are only used long enough to run through a suite of tests as the software moves through a delivery pipeline on its way to production.
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Articles 09 Oct 2012
Agile DevOps: Version everything
Which types of software-system artifacts should you version? In this Agile DevOps installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall recommends that DevOps teams version application code, infrastructure, configuration, data, and even internal system artifacts to gain the capacity to deliver software to users quickly and often.
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Articles 27 Nov 2012
Agile DevOps: Unleash the Chaos Monkey
When would it ever be a good idea to randomly and intentionally try to terminate parts of your software system -- including the hardware it runs on? How about early and often? In this Agile DevOps installment, DevOps expert Paul Duvall describes approaches to creating a Chaos Monkey (as it's been dubbed by Netflix) to ensure that your production infrastructure can recover from inevitable system failures.
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Articles 23 Oct 2012
Ajax and REST, Part 1
The more that server-side Web applications become immersive by following rich-application models and delivering personalized content, the more their architectures violate Representational State Transfer (REST), the Web's architectural style. These violations can decrease application scalability and increase system complexity. By achieving harmony with REST, Ajax architecture lets immersive Web applications eliminate these negative effects and enjoy REST's desirable properties.
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Articles 02 Oct 2006
Ajax for Java developers: Build dynamic Java applications
The page-reload cycle presents one of the biggest usability obstacles in Web application development and is a serious challenge for Java developers. In this series, author Philip McCarthy introduces a groundbreaking approach to creating dynamic Web application experiences. Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a programming technique that lets you combine Java technologies, XML, and JavaScript for Java-based Web applications that break the page-reload paradigm.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 20 Sep 2005
Ajax for Java developers: Java object serialization for Ajax
If you're doing JavaWeb development using Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax), then delivering data from the server to the client is probably your top concern. In this second article in the Ajax for Java developers series, Philip McCarthy walks you through five approaches to Java object serialization and gives you all the information you need to choose the data format and technology best suited to your application.
Articles 04 Oct 2005
All about JAXP, Part 1
The Java API for XML Processing (JAXP) lets you validate, parse, and transform XML using several different APIs. JAXP provides both ease of use and vendor neutrality. This article, the first of a two-part series introducing JAXP, shows you how to take advantage of the API's parsing and validation features. Part 2 will cover XSL transformations using JAXP.
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Articles 17 May 2005
alt.lang.jre: Feeling Groovy
Andrew Glover offers an informal introduction to Groovy, the proposed addition to the standard programming languages for the Java platform.
Articles 03 Aug 2004
An analysis of the Apache Geronimo PetStore demo
Want practical instructions for building an enterprise application that you can use in your business? The iBATIS PetStore application is an example application that originated from the Sun Java BluePrints program. The application illustrates how to use the capabilities of the iBATIS persistence framework, the all-Java Apache Derby database, and Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) to develop a simple cross-platform enterprise application. This article provides tips and techniques that you can use to exploit the features of iBATIS, Derby, and Apache Geronimo to construct a flexible and usable implementation of the PetStore application.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 03 Oct 2006
An introduction to JDO 2.0 using JPOX and DB2 Universal Database
This article shows how to use the Java Persistent Object (JPOX) implementation to abstract the tedious writing of SQL to persist and retrieve data from your DB2 database. We showcase JPOX 1.1, chosen by the Java Community Process to be the reference implementation of Java Data Ojects 2.0. JPOX is released under the Apache 2.0 open source license and is free to use.
Articles 23 Jun 2005
An introduction to RichFaces
Today's clients want and have begun to expect desktop features in browser-based applications. RichFaces is one of a new breed of user interface component suites available for Java Server Faces (JSF). Among other benefits, RichFaces provides built-in JavaScript and Ajax capabilities to meet those expectations. Joe Sam Shirah adds some new tools to your kit based on experiences with a recent field project, including general setup for using RichFaces with Facelets, and several specific component examples. Ed note: For details on migrating your web page components to RichFaces 4, see "Using RichFaces with JSF 2."
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 25 Mar 2008
An NIO.2 primer, Part 1: The asynchronous channel APIs
The More New I/O APIs for the Java Platform (NIO.2) is one of the major new functional areas in Java 7, adding asynchronous channel functionality and a new file system API to the language. Developers will gain support for platform-independent file operations, asynchronous operations, and multicast socket channels. Part 1 of this two-part article focuses on the asynchronous channel APIs in NIO.2, and Part 2 covers the new file system functionality.
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Articles 21 Sep 2010
An NIO.2 primer, Part 2: The file system APIs
This article, the second half of a two-part introduction to More New I/O APIs for the Java Platform (NIO.2), covers the most useful classes and functionality in the new java.nio.file package and subpackages. As in Part 1's discussion of the NIO.2 asynchronous channel APIs, the authors demonstrate the concepts involved with extensive code examples.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 21 Sep 2010
Annotations in Tiger, Part 1: Add metadata to Java code
Annotations, a new feature in J2SE 5.0 (Tiger), brings a much-needed metadata facility to the core Java language. In this first of a two-part series, author Brett McLaughlin explains why metadata is so useful, introduces you to annotations in the Java language, and delves into Tiger's built-in annotations. Part 2 covers custom annotations.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 02 Sep 2004
Annotations in Tiger, Part 2: Custom annotations
Part 1 of this series introduced annotations, the new metadata facility in J2SE 5.0, and focused on Tiger's basic built-in annotations. A more powerful related feature is support for writing your own annotations. In this article Brett McLauglin shows how to create custom annotations and then how to annotate your annotations to document and customize your code further.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 02 Sep 2004
AOP@Work: AOP and metadata: A perfect match, Part 1
In this first half of a two-part article, author Ramnivas Laddad provides a conceptual overview of the new Java metadata facility and shows where AOP could most benefit from the addition of metadata annotations. He then walks you through a five-part design refactoring, starting with a metadata-free AOP implementation and concluding with one that combines the Participant design pattern with annotator-supplier aspects.
Articles 08 Mar 2005
AOP@Work: AOP myths and realities
What's keeping you from trying out AOP? Whether you think it's only good for low-level functions like tracing and logging, worry that it'll get in the way of unit testing, or would simply rather stick with the object-oriented alternatives, Ramnivas Laddad gives you good reason to reconsider. Follow along as this popular author and speaker digs beneath the surface of 15 myths that hinder the adoption of AOP.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 14 Feb 2006
AOP@Work: AOP tools comparison, Part 1
AOP is a technology whose time has come, but how do you choose the right tool for your projects? In this first article in the new AOP@Work series, aspect-oriented programming expert Mik Kersten compares the four leading AOP tools (AspectJ, AspectWerkz, JBoss AOP, and Spring AOP) to help you decide which one is for you. In Part 1 of this two-part discussion, the author focuses on the tools' language mechanisms and the trade-offs imposed by the different approaches.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 08 Feb 2005
AOP@Work: AOP tools comparison, Part 2
In this second half of his two-part AOP tools comparison, aspect-oriented programming expert Mik Kersten focuses on the tools' integration with the development environment and build process, including a point-by-point comparison of the tools' IDE features. To help you make your final decision, the author concludes with a look at what's to come for these rapidly evolving tools, and provides a summary of each one's strengths and weaknesses. Note that this article addresses the implications of the recently announced merging of the AspectJ and AspectWerkz projects.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 08 Feb 2005
AOP@Work: Component design with Contract4J
Design by Contract is a proven technique for clarifying component design details, documenting proper usage for clients, and testing usage compliance programmatically. In this final article in the AOP@Work series, Dean Wampler introduces Contract4J, a Design by Contract tool that specifies contracts using Java 5 annotations and evaluates them at run time using AspectJ aspects. Along with being a strong addition to your AOP toolkit, Contract4J offers insight into emerging trends in aspect-oriented design.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 11 Apr 2006
AOP@Work: Dependency injection with AspectJ and Spring
Dependency injection and aspect-oriented programming are complementary techniques, so it's natural to want to use them together. Follow along as Adrian Colyer explores the relationship between the two and shows you how you can combine them to facilitate advanced dependency injection scenarios.
Articles 13 Dec 2005
AOP@Work: Design with pointcuts to avoid pattern density
In "JUnit: A Cook's Tour," authors Erich Gamma and Kent Beck discuss the design of JUnit. They point out that TestCase, like key abstractions in many mature frameworks, has a high pattern density, making it easy to use but hard to change. In this fourth installment of the AOP@Work series, Wes Isberg revisits the Cook's Tour and shows you how using AOP pointcuts rather than object-oriented designs can help you avoid some of the pattern density that makes mature designs hard to change.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 14 Jun 2005
AOP@Work: Enhance design patterns with AspectJ, Part 1
Design patterns have long been part of the experienced developer's tool chest. Unfortunately, because patterns can affect multiple classes, they can also be invasive and hard to (re)use. In this two-part article, the third in the AOP@Work series, Nicholas Lesiecki shows you how AOP solves this problem by fundamentally transforming pattern implementation. He examines three classic Gang of Four (GoF) design patterns (Adapter, Decorator, and Observer) and discusses the practical and design benefits of implementing them with aspect-oriented techniques.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 17 May 2005
AOP@Work: Enhance design patterns with AspectJ, Part 2
Nicholas Lesiecki continues his discussion of the benefits of implementing design patterns with aspect-oriented techniques with this in-depth study of the Observer pattern. In this article of the AOP@Work series, he illustrates how AspectJ allows complex patterns to be converted into reusable base aspects, thus enabling framework authors to supply prebuilt libraries of patterns for developers to exploit.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 17 May 2005
AOP@Work: Introducing AspectJ 5
Now in its second milestone build, AspectJ 5 is a big leap forward for aspect-oriented programming on the Java platform. A major focus of AspectJ 5 is on providing support for the new Java language features introduced in Java 5, including annotations and generics. In addition, the language contains new features not tied to Java 5, such as an annotation-based style for writing aspects, improved load-time weaving, and a new aspect instantiation model. Get a first look at AspectJ 5 from Adrian Colyer, lead developer on the project, as he introduces you to both the AspectJ 5 language and the release containing the AspectJ compiler and associated tools.
Articles 12 Jul 2005
AOP@Work: Next steps with aspects
Once you've taken the first plunge into aspects, you'll want to keep going and going, but it's never a good idea to travel without a map. In this article, esteemed aspect developer Ron Bodkin gives you a guided tour of the four stages of successful aspect adoption, from first experiments with tracing and testing all the way to building your own reusable aspect libraries.
Articles 16 Mar 2006
AOP@Work: Performance monitoring with AspectJ, Part 1
Say goodbye to scattered and tangled monitoring code, as Ron Bodkin shows you how to combine AspectJ and JMX for a flexible, modular approach to performance monitoring. In this first of two parts, Ron uses source code and ideas from the Glassbox Inspector open source project to help you build a monitoring system that provides correlated information to identify specific problems, but with low enough overhead to be used in production environments.
Articles 13 Sep 2005
Apache Mahout: Scalable machine learning for everyone
Apache Mahout committer Grant Ingersoll brings you up to speed on the current version of the Mahout machine-learning library and walks through an example of how to deploy and scale some of Mahout's more popular algorithms.
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Articles 08 Nov 2011
API documentation process series: Creating Javadoc API documentation with directly updated source
The article describes the generation of Javadoc documentation using a directly updated source code in IBM Rational ClearCase (hereafter, ClearCase). The process described in this article is the result of discussions and experimentation by development and documentation teams. The proposed API reference documentation process streamlines the process for generating public API Javadoc documentation for applications. The process resolves the need to copy source code files back and forth between developers and the API writer. It also ensures that the latest source code is always being used and updated. As a result, the generated Javadoc HTML files will reflect both writer input and developer comments with minimal developer effort to merge in the API writer edits. Also, the Javadoc builds for internal customers will include the most complete documentation possible, because all documentation updates are reflected back into the source code.
Articles 09 May 2006
API documentation process series: Creating Javadoc API documentation with indirectly updated source
Articles 25 Apr 2006
Automate virtual machine discovery and self-connectivity
In a virtual data center the deployment and the dismissal of complex appliances require that multiple configuration steps be executed. Reconfiguration requirements include establishing and removing communication between different components of the same product running in different virtual machines (VMs) as well as different products running in different VMs. Traditionally this process has been burdensomely manual or somewhat inflexible via the invoking of predefined scripts with static values. In this article, the authors propose StereoCable, automated plug-and-play support of complex virtual appliances in a virtual data center, to solve this issue. This way VMs are able to discover and automatically connect to each other based on predefined connections policies.
Also available in: Chinese   Portuguese  
Articles 01 Nov 2010
Automation for the people: Build Java projects with Raven
Ant is arguably the de facto build tool for the Java platform; however, other build tools, which support a more expressive paradigm that XML lacks, are entering the scene. In this installment of Automation for the people, automation expert Paul Duvall describes how Raven, a build platform built on top of Ruby, leverages the power of a full-featured programming language with the simplicity of a build-centric Domain Specific Language.
Also available in: Russian  
Articles 06 Nov 2007
Automation for the people: Choosing a Continuous Integration server
With so many Continuous Integration (CI) servers to choose from, it can be difficult to decide which one is right for you. In the second article of the series Automation for the people, development automation expert Paul Duvall looks at a handful of open source CI servers, including Continuum, CruiseControl, and Luntbuild, using a consistent evaluation criteria and illustrative examples.
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Articles 05 Sep 2006
Automation for the people: Continuous feedback
Feedback is vital for the practice of Continuous Integration (CI) -- in fact, it's the life blood of a CI system. Rapid feedback enables speedy responses to build events that require attention. Without feedback mediums like e-mail or RSS, builds in a broken state have the tendency to stay broken, which defeats the purpose of CI in the first place! In this installment of Automation for the people, automation expert Paul Duvall examines various feedback mechanisms that you can incorporate into CI systems.
Articles 14 Nov 2006
Automation for the people: Continuous Inspection
Enhance your software development process by employing source code analysis tools to automatically obtain the latest information on code complexity, duplication, and coding standards adherence.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 01 Aug 2006
Automation for the people: Continuous Integration anti-patterns
While Continuous Integration (CI) can be extremely effective at reducing risks on a project, it requires a greater emphasis on your day-to-day activities related to coding. In Part 1 of a two-part article in the Automation for the people series, automation expert and co-author of Continuous Integration: Improving Software Quality and Reducing Risk, Paul Duvall, lays out a series of CI anti-patterns, and more importantly, shows how to avoid them.
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Articles 04 Dec 2007
Automation for the people: Continuous Integration anti-patterns, Part 2
While Continuous Integration (CI) can be extremely effective at reducing risks on a project, it requires a greater emphasis on your day-to-day coding activities. In this second installment of a two-part article on CI anti-patterns, automation expert and co-author of Continuous Integration: Improving Software Quality and Reducing Risk, Paul Duvall, continues laying out CI anti-patterns, and more importantly, demonstrates how to avoid them.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 04 Mar 2008
Automation for the people: Deployment-automation patterns, Part 1
Java deployments are often messy, error-prone, and manual, leading to delays in making software available to users. In Part 1 of a two-part article in the Automation for the people series, automation expert Paul Duvall identifies a collection of key patterns for developing a reliable, repeatable, and consistent deployment process capable of generating one-click deployments for Java applications.
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Articles 13 Jan 2009
Automation for the people: Hands-off load testing
Load testing is often relegated to late-cycle activities, but it doesn't need to be that way. In this installment of Automation for the people, automation expert Paul Duvall describes how you can discover and fix problems throughout the development cycle by creating a scheduled integration build that runs JMeter tests.
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Articles 08 Apr 2008
Automation for the people: Improving code with Eclipse plugins
What if you were able to discover potential problems in your code prior to building it? Interestingly enough, there are Eclipse plugins for tools such as JDepend and CheckStyle that can help you discover problems before they are manifested in software. In this installment of Automation for the people, automation expert Paul Duvall provides examples of installing, configuring, and using these static analysis plugins in Eclipse so that you can prevent problems early in the development life cycle.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 11 Jan 2007
Automation for the people: Remove the smell from your build scripts
How much time do you spend maintaining project build scripts? Probably much more than you'd expect or would like to admit. It doesn't have to be such a painful experience. Development automation expert Paul Duvall uses this installment of Automation for the people to demonstrate how to improve a number of common build practices that prevent teams from creating consistent, repeatable, and maintainable builds.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian  
Articles 10 Oct 2006
Automation for the people: Speed deployment with automation
Automated builds aren't just for development teams -- they can be extended to facilitate moving software from development all the way into production. In this installment of Automation for the people, automation expert Paul Duvall describes how to use Ant with Java Secure Channel for remotely deploying software into multiple target environments.
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Articles 08 Jan 2008
Basics steps: Converting an IBM Lotus Notes application to use Lotus Notes 8 Java components
Java™ views were introduced in the IBM® Lotus® Notes® client in release 8.0. Many new features were implemented using the Java views to modernize the Lotus Notes interface. This article outlines the steps that IBM Lotus Domino developers would take to convert their own Lotus Domino® (simple) applications into Java views. This document presumes that you have an installed version of Lotus Notes 8.5, IBM Lotus Domino Designer 8.5, and Lotus Notes composite application editor 8.5 and that you are familiar with working in Lotus Domino Designer.
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Articles 29 Jun 2009
Best practices for developing Eclipse plugins
This tutorial highlights best practices when marking information to resources using markers, and then introduces annotations and decorators that you use to highlight markers within the workbench. By extending extension points, you can reuse and adapt the built-in functions in Eclipse and perform advanced resource marking, such as moving a text marker when editing text. We discuss methods that take advantage of the plugin model, which allows for an efficient, high performance, and integrated look and feel plugin.
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Tutorial 16 Aug 2011
Best practices for location-aware services
This tutorial gets you started with IBM Enterprise LAS middleware. Learn the concepts behind the middleware and write a simple location-tracking Web application with the help of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) technologies. With these best practices in mind, you'll be on your way to building faster location-tracking systems that can easily integrate with positioning/sensoring technologies, such as RFID and Zigbee.
Tutorial 06 Jun 2006
Best practices in EJB exception handling
As J2EE has become the enterprise development platform of choice, more and more J2EE-based applications are going into production. One important component of the J2EE platform is the Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) API. Together, J2EE and EJB technology offer many advantages, but with these advantages come new challenges. In this article, Enterprise Java programming veteran Srikanth Shenoy reveals his best practices in EJB exception handling for faster problem resolution.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 01 May 2002
Blockchain chaincode for Java developers
Blockchain is changing the way business transactions are done on the Internet. In this tutorial, you'll install a blockchain network and run a chaincode smart contract written in the Java language.
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Tutorial 30 Mar 2017
Bluemix demo at the Cloud World Forum 2015
Ed Shee, Cloud Software Specialist for IBM Bluemix, walks through a quick 3-minute demo on creating an application in the cloud with IBM Bluemix utilizing Watson Personality Insights. He shows how easy it is to provision a boilerplate -- a runtime, a service, and some starter code all bundled together.
Videos 04 Aug 2015
Bonita for business process management, Part 1: Configure a simple workflow
Open source Java-based tools for business process management (BPM) are coming into their own. In this two-part article, Bilal Siddiqui introduces BPM concepts and shows the features of Bonita Open Solution -- a BPM engine that implements the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) standard. In Part 1, you'll learn how various BPMN elements work and start configuring an example business-process workflow with Bonita. In Part 2, you'll complete the remaining configuration tasks to implement the workflow.
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Articles 12 Oct 2010
Bonita for business process management, Part 2: Configure forms and variables
Bonita Open Solution, an open source Java-based business process management (BPM) tool, lets you model, configure, and execute business workflows without writing a single line of Java code. This article concludes a two-part series demonstrating use of Bonita to design a workflow for booking hotel rooms. Picking up where Part 1 leaves off, you'll configure variables and design user-interaction forms for the workflow, then connect it with a database and a reporting engine. When configuration is complete, you'll see the room-booking process in action.
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Articles 02 Nov 2010
Boost JDBC application performance using the IBM Data Server Driver for JDBC and SQLJ
Developing high performing JDBC applications is not an easy task. This article helps you gain a better understanding of the factors that contribute to your JDBC application performance using the IBM Data Server Driver for JDBC and SQLJ to access DB2 and Informix. Learn to identify these issues and to find and alleviate client-side bottlenecks.
Articles 01 Nov 2012
Build a data mining app using Java, Weka, and the dashDB service
The dashDB (formerly known as Analytics Warehouse and BLU Acceleration) service provides data warehousing and analytics as a service on IBM Bluemix. Developers can develop and deploy a heavy-duty analytic application using blazing-fast IBM BLU database technology offered in the cloud. Learn how to develop a data mining application using the Weka statistical analysis tool and leveraging the IBM BLU columnar database.
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Articles 08 May 2015
Build a Hangman game with Java, Ajax, and Cloudant
Learn how to build an online Hangman game by using the Bluemix Liberty for Java runtime and Cloudant NoSQL database service.
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Tutorial 04 Sep 2014
Build a portable Java travel app that integrates web services
Learn how to develop and deploy a Java PaaS web app on the cloud.
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Articles 27 Jun 2014
Build a RESTful Web service
Representational state transfer (REST) is a style of designing loosely coupled applications that rely on named resources rather than messages. The hardest part of building a RESTful application is deciding on the resources you want to expose. Once you've done that, using the open source Restlet framework makes building RESTful Web services a snap. This tutorial guides you step-by-step through the fundamental concepts of REST and building applications with Restlets.
Also available in: Portuguese  
Tutorial 22 Jul 2008
Build a text visualization and analytics application
Text visualization is an effective way to see and analyze what a designated text is saying. Learn to combine Eclipse and open source text visualization and analytics tools to build a word-wave application that visualizes and compares two texts.
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Articles 02 Apr 2013
Build apps using Asynchronous JavaScript with XML (Ajax)
Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript with XML) enables a dynamic, asynchronous Web experience without the need for page refreshes. In this tutorial, you learn to build Ajax-based Web applications -- complete with real time validation and without page refreshes -- by following the construction of a sample book order application.
Tutorial 15 Nov 2005
Build better Web applications with Google Sitebricks
Do you want to quickly build a Web application that can be maintained, or worked on, by other people? Google Sitebricks lets you rapidly develop Web applications that are built to last. Sitebricks uses dependency injection to do away with boilerplate code. It leverages type safety and inference to check the correctness of your application, so you catch problems at compile time instead of run time. In this article, learn how to build Web applications powered by Google Sitebricks.
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Articles 16 Feb 2010
Build configurable workflows with WS-BPEL and IoC, Part 2: Developing and hosting BPEL workflows
In Part 2 of this brief series, Bilal Siddiqui explains how to use BPEL to express the logic of configurable business workflows. You'll learn how to host your BPEL applications on a BPEL engine and make them work in conjunction with an IoC implementation.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 30 Sep 2008
Build faster Web applications with caching
Web developers who use Java technologies can quickly improve their applications' performance by using a cache utility. Java Caching System (JCS), a powerful distributed caching system for Java applications, is a highly configurable tool with a simple API. This article gives you an overview of JCS and shows how you can use it to speed up your Web applications.
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Articles 02 Dec 2008
Build server-cluster-aware Java applications
Server clustering has become commonplace for highly scalable Java enterprise application development, but application-level server-cluster awareness is not currently part of Java EE. In this article, Mukul Gupta and Paresh Paladiya show you how to leverage two open source projects, Apache ZooKeeper and LinkedIn's Project Norbert, for server-group coordination in distributed enterprise Java applications.
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Articles 27 Aug 2013
Build software with Gant
Gant is a highly versatile build framework that leverages both Groovy and Apache Ant to let you implement programmatic logic while using all of Ant's capabilities. In this tutorial, Andy Glover guides you step-by-step through Gant's fundamental concepts. You'll learn how to define behavior in your build through Gant's flexible domain-specific language, how to reuse Ant features, and how to define functions that make your builds more efficient and even proactive.
Also available in: Chinese  
Tutorial 27 May 2008
CallableStatement handling using named parameters
Explore a powerful new feature of IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) called "named parameters in a CallableStatement," which enables you to identify a parameter using its name instead of its ordinal position. This feature thus extends the capability of using CallableStatements so that they can be used either by ordinal position or parameter name. Learn the difference between the two techniques, and see the advantages of named parameters over the ordinal technique.
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Articles 21 Feb 2008
Capturing screen shots and program interaction on UNIX and Linux systems: Part 1, Program interaction
Taking screen shots and capturing interaction between a program and user is something that all technical writers, most developers, and many technical marketing staff need to do. Modern UNIX systems provide a number of different tools to capture the text-oriented interaction between a user and a specific program and to capture graphical screens and single windows. This article, the first of three, focuses on different ways to keep a record of the interaction between a user and a command-line application. Capturing user input and program output is valuable, not just for internal or external documentation, but also for use as a common debugging mechanism for many application developers.
Also available in: Chinese  
Articles 22 Jun 2010
Cellular automata and music
Take computers, mathematics, and the Java Sound API, add in some Java code, and you've got a recipe for creating some uniquely fascinating music. IBM Staff Software Engineer Paul Reiners demonstrates how to implement some basic concepts of algorithmic music composition in the Java language. He presents code examples and resulting MIDI files generated by the Automatous Monk program, which uses the open source jMusic framework to compose music based on mathematical structures called cellular automata.
Articles 18 May 2004
Classworking toolkit: Annotations vs. configuration files
Annotations let you specify metadata as part of your source code. With this feature, you can embed tool instructions in your code rather than creating separate configuration files that you then need to maintain in parallel to the source code. But, as Java consultant Dennis Sosnoski explains, configuration files still have their uses, especially for aspect-like functions that cut across the source code structure of an application.
Articles 02 Aug 2005
Classworking toolkit: Performance tracing with aspects
In this edition of Classworking toolkit, consultant Dennis Sosnoski takes up where he left off last month by applying an aspect-oriented approach to performance analysis. He investigates a client application using the Apache Axis Web services framework to find where the execution time is being spent. Along the way, Dennis looks into the issue of measuring time intervals in Java code and shows how you can find the granularity and overhead of the timer implementation on your system.
Articles 05 Apr 2005
Client and server-side templating with Velocity
Velocity is a versatile, open source templating solution that can be used standalone in report generation/data transformation applications, or as a view component in MVC model frameworks. In this article, Sing Li introduces Velocity and reveals how you can integrate its template-processing capabilities into your own client-side standalone application, server-side Web application, or Web services.
Articles 10 Feb 2004
Clojure and concurrency
The Clojure programming language has gained a lot of attention recently. The attention, however, is not for some of the obvious reasons, such as it being a modern Lisp dialect or that it runs on top of the Java Virtual Machine. The features that are drawing many people to it are its concurrency features. Clojure is perhaps most well known for supporting the Software Transactional Memory (STM) model natively. STM, however, is not always the best solution for every concurrency problem. Clojure includes support for other paradigms in the form of agents and atoms. This article examines each of the concurrency approaches that Clojure provides and explores when each is most appropriate.
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Articles 14 Sep 2010
Comment lines: Roland Barcia: How useful are annotated named queries in the Java Persistence API, really?
Annotations do make things easier for a developer, but simplicity comes with trade-offs. The Java Persistence API (JPA) makes use of annotations as a mechanism to map Java objects to the underlying database, but developers often use annotations even when it doesn't make sense. Find out some of the other ways to access data through JPA, and when and why these alternatives are the better options.
Articles 19 Apr 2006
Comment lines: Scott Johnson: Take a lifetime to be a good (and happy) programmer
A happy programmer knows what they're good at and what is really involved in that pie-in-the-sky job he or she desires. Inspired by an article on the average programmer's big rush to learn the practice of programming, the author shares his views on the topic.
Articles 17 Aug 2005
Compare JavaScript frameworks
Modern Web sites and Web applications tend to rely quite heavily on client-side JavaScript to provide rich interactivity, particularly through the advent of asynchronous HTTP requests that do not require page refreshes to return data or responses from a server-side script or database system. In this article, you will discover how JavaScript frameworks make it easier and faster to create highly interactive and responsive Web sites and Web applications.
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Articles 02 Feb 2010
Concurrency in JDK 5.0
JDK 5.0 added major new support for developing concurrent applications, including JVM changes, new low-level synchronization utilities, and higher-level, thread-safe, high-performance concurrency classes such as thread pools, concurrent collections, semaphores, latches, and barriers. Learn how these new classes can help make your code faster, more scalable, more reliable, and easier to maintain.
Tutorial 23 Nov 2004
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