Filter by products, topics, and types of content

(0 Products)

(122 Topics)

(4 Industries)

(6 Types)

1 - 20 of 20 results
Show Summaries | Hide Summaries
View Results
Title none Type none Date none
Java web services: WS-Security without client certificates
WS-Security symmetric encryption lets you secure message exchanges between client and server without requiring client certificates, simplifying your web service configuration while also providing performance benefits. You can use it directly or in the bootstrap for WS-SecureConversation exchanges. In this article, you'll learn how to configure and use symmetric encryption with the three main open source Java web services stacks: Axis2, Metro, and CXF. You'll also see how plain WS-Security symmetric encryption performance compares to WS-SecureConversation performance.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Spanish  
Articles 03 Aug 2010
Java Web Services: Axis2 Data Binding
The Apache Axis2 Web services framework was designed from the start to support multiple XML data-binding approaches. The current release provides full support for XMLBeans and JiBX data binding, as well as the custom Axis Data Binding (ADB) approach developed specifically for Axis2. This article shows you how to use these different data bindings with Axis2 and explains why you might prefer one over the others for your application.
Also available in: Portuguese  
Articles 26 Jul 2007
Java web services: WS-Trust and WS-SecureConversation
WS-Security adds enterprise-level security features to SOAP message exchanges, but with a substantial performance cost. WS-Trust builds on WS-Security to provide a way of exchanging security tokens, and WS-SecureConversation builds on WS-Security and WS-Trust to improve performance for ongoing message exchanges. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java web services column series with an introduction to WS-Trust and WS-SecureConversation.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 25 May 2010
Java web services: WS-SecureConversation performance
WS-SecureConversation lets you secure ongoing web service message exchanges with less processing overhead than plain WS-Security. In this article, you'll learn how to configure and use WS-SecureConversation with the three main open source Java web services stacks: Apache Axis2, Metro, and Apache CXF. You'll also see how the three stacks compare on WS-SecureConversation performance.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese   Spanish  
Articles 22 Jun 2010
Java Web services: WS-Security with Metro
The Metro Web services stack is based on the reference implementations of the JAXB 2.x and JAX-WS 2.x Java standards but also includes support for a full range of WS-* SOAP extension technologies. This article continues Dennis Sosnoski's Java Web services column series with coverage of WS-Security configuration and usage in Metro.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 01 Dec 2009
Java Web services: Digging into Axis2: AXIOM
The Apache Axis2 Web services framework builds on the new AXIOM XML document model for efficient SOAP message processing. Unlike conventional document models, AXIOM builds the document representation in memory only as it's being accessed. Learn why this on-demand construction is a great approach for SOAP processing, and how XOP/MTOM attachments, data binding, and performance fit into the picture.
Also available in: Portuguese  
Articles 30 Nov 2006
Java web services: WS-Security with CXF
The Apache CXF web services stack supports WS-Security, including using WS-SecurityPolicy to configure the security handling. CXF is flexible in how you configure the deployment parameters used at run time to implement the security handling, supporting both static and dynamic configuration options for the client side. In this article, Java web services series author Dennis Sosnoski shows how to use CXF for both a simple UsernameToken WS-Security example and one using signing and encryption.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 23 Mar 2010
Java web services: Modeling and verifying WS-SecurityPolicy
WS-SecurityPolicy lets you define security configurations as part of your Web Service Description Language (WSDL) service description. It's a powerful tool, but working with WS-SecurityPolicy documents can be painful. Assertions must be correctly structured to be effective, and version namespaces need to be consistent. In this article, you'll learn about common errors made in creating WS-SecurityPolicy documents, and you'll see how WS-Policy and WS-SecurityPolicy can be modeled in Java for verification and transformation.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 19 Apr 2011
Java Web services: Granular use of WS-Security
WS-Security for SOAP Web services doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing proposition. By configuring WS-Security at the operation or message level, you can apply an appropriate degree of protection to every exchange, reducing or eliminating the WS-Security overhead for operations that don't need full protection. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services series with a look at granular WS-Security in Web Services Description Language (WSDL) using Apache Axis2 and Rampart.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Spanish  
Articles 04 Aug 2009
Java Web services: Introducing Metro
The Metro Web service stack provides a comprehensive solution for accessing and implementing Web services. It's based on the reference implementations of the JAXB 2.x and JAX-WS 2.x Java standards, with added components to support WS-* SOAP extension technologies and actual Web service deployment. This article continues Dennis Sosnoski's Java Web services column series with a look at the basic principles of Metro client and server development.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 03 Nov 2009
Java web services: The high cost of (WS-)Security
WS-Security offers powerful features for securing web service applications, and for many applications these features are essential. But these features come at a high cost in terms of performance and message overhead. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java web services column series with a look at how using WS-Security or WS-SecureConversation affects Axis2 performance, and he discusses when the simpler (and better performing) alternative of HTTPS-secured connections is a more appropriate choice.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Spanish  
Articles 07 Jul 2009
Java web services: Understanding and modeling WSDL 1.1
Several years after the approval of Web Services Description Language (WSDL) 2.0 as a World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standard, WSDL 1.1 is still the most widely used form of web service description. Despite its popularity, WSDL 1.1 has some issues, including a variety of schemas in use and variations in how web services stacks process WSDL documents. In this article you'll learn how WSDL 1.1 service descriptions are structured. You'll also see the basic structure of a Java tool for verifying WSDL documents and transforming them into a "best practices" form.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 08 Feb 2011
Java Web services: JAXB and JAX-WS in Axis2
Apache Axis2 supports a range of data-binding technologies, including the official Java standard, JAXB 2.x. Axis2 also supports the Java standard for Web service configuration, JAX-WS 2.x, as an alternative to its own custom configuration technique. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services column series by demonstrating how you can use each of these Java standards with Axis2 and discussing some of the limitations of Axis2's current support for them.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Portuguese  
Articles 15 Sep 2009
Java web services: Understanding WS-Policy
WS-Policy provides a general structure for configuring features and options that apply to a web service. You've seen it used for WS-Security configurations in this series, and perhaps elsewhere for other extension technologies such as WS-ReliableMessaging. In this article, you'll learn about the structure of WS-Policy documents and the ways you can attach policies to services in Web Service Description Language (WSDL), with security-configuration examples tried on Apache Axis2, Metro, and Apache CXF.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 02 Nov 2010
Java Web services: Axis2 WS-Security basics
Learn how to add the Rampart security module to Apache Axis2 and start using WS-Security features in your Web services. Dennis Sosnoski resumes his Java Web services series with a look at WS-Security and WS-SecurityPolicy use in Axis2, starting with UsernameToken as a simple first step. The next few columns will take you further with WS-Security and WS-SecurityPolicy, as implemented by Axis2 and Rampart.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Spanish  
Articles 26 May 2009
Java Web services: Axis2 WS-Security signing and encryption
Get an introduction to the principles of public key cryptography, then see how WS-Security applies them for signing and encrypting SOAP messages using public-private key pairs in combination with secret keys. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services series with a discussion of WS-Security and WS-SecurityPolicy signing and encryption features, along with example code using Axis2 and Rampart.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese   Spanish  
Articles 16 Jun 2009
Java web services: Introducing CXF
The Apache CXF web services stack supports JAXB 2.x data binding (along with some alternative data bindings) and JAX-WS 2.x service configuration. Like the Metro JAXB/JAX-WS alternative discussed in earlier columns, CXF uses XML files to extend the JAX-WS configuration information. In this article, Java web services series author Dennis Sosnoski looks into the basics of working with CXF for client and server development.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese   Spanish  
Articles 09 Feb 2010
Java Web services: Metro vs. Axis2 performance
The Metro Web services stack provides the same functionality as the Axis2 stack but, aside from the optional use of JAXB and JAX-WS in Axis2, uses completely different implementations of the technologies involved. In this article, Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services column series with a performance comparison between the Metro and Axis2 stacks, both with and without WS-Security.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 19 Jan 2010
Java web services: The state of web service security
WS-Security and related standards provide a wide range of options for web service security. Of this wide range, web services stacks test only a limited number of security configurations, and even fewer configurations for interoperability, on their own. Find out what the industry has done to promote interoperability among web services stacks, and read a summary comparison of how the three main open source Java stacks handle security.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 07 Dec 2010
Java web services: CXF performance comparison
Apache CXF shares certain underlying components with both Apache Axis2 and Metro but combines the components within an entirely different architecture. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java web services column series by comparing how the CXF, Metro, and Axis2 stacks perform both with and without WS-Security.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 27 Apr 2010
1 - 20 of 20 results
Show Summaries | Hide Summaries