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Working with XML on Android
Android is a modern, open source operating system and SDK for mobile devices. With it you can create powerful mobile applications. This becomes even more attractive when your applications can access Web services, which means you need to speak the language of the Web: XML. In this article, you will see different options for working with XML on Android and how to use them to build your own Android applications.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 01 Feb 2013
Your first cup of CoffeeScript, Part 4: Using CoffeeScript on the server
This series explores the popular CoffeeScript programming language, which is built on top of JavaScript. CoffeeScript compiles into JavaScript that is efficient and consistent with many best practices. You can run this JavaScript in a web browser or use it with technologies such as Node.js for server applications. In previous parts of this series, you learned the benefits of CoffeeScript, set up the development environment, exercised many of the features, and wrote the client-side code for a real application using CoffeeScript. In this final part of the series, it's time to write the server-side CoffeeScript.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 21 Feb 2012
Your first cup of CoffeeScript, Part 3: Using CoffeeScript on the client
This series explores the popular CoffeeScript programming language, which is built on top of JavaScript. CoffeeScript compiles into JavaScript that is efficient and consistent with many best practices. You can run this JavaScript in a web browser or use it with technologies such as Node.js for server applications. Part 1 of this series explained how to get started with CoffeeScript and explained the perks for developers. Part 2 described how to use CoffeeScript to solve several programming problems. This article explains how to create a complete application using CoffeeScript.
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Articles 14 Feb 2012
Your first cup of CoffeeScript, Part 1: Getting started
There's a lot of hype and fuss about CoffeeScript, a new programming language built on top of JavaScript. CoffeeScript offers a clean syntax that should appeal to those who like Python or Ruby. It also provides many functional programming features inspired by languages such as Haskell and Lisp. CoffeeScript compiles into efficient JavaScript, and in addition to running the JavaScript in a web browser, you can use it with technologies such as Node.js for server applications. In this first article of a four-part series, get started with CoffeeScript and learn about the perks for developers. You will set up the CoffeeScript compiler and use it to create code that's ready to run in a browser or server.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Japanese  
Articles 06 Dec 2011
Mobile web application framework match-up, Part 4: Rely on Sencha Touch as a complete mobile web solution
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Articles 18 Jan 2011
모바일 웹 애플리케이션 프레임워크 매치업, Part 3: jQTouch로 차세대 모바일 웹 앱 부스트
모바일 웹 애플리케이션이 포함된 모바일 개발에 대한 관심은 사상 최고에 이르렀습니다. 모바일 웹에 관심이 있는 일부 개발자들은 데스크탑이나 서버측 백그라운드 중 하나에서부터 이에 접근합니다. 하지만, 다수는 그들의 현재 웹 개발 기술을 모바일 웹에 적용하려고 노력하고 있기 때문에, 모바일 사용자를 위한 개발을 시작하기 위해 전혀 다른 어떤 것을 배우려고 하지 않습니다. 이는 그들이 네이티브 모바일 개발 대신에 모바일 웹에 관심을 가지는 이유의 일부입니다. 웹 개발에서는 클라이언트측 프레임워크들이 많이 있지만, 주장하건대 jQuery가 그 중 가장 대중적입니다. 따라서 jQuery를 이미 매우 잘 알고 있으며 모바일에 관심을 가지는 웹 개발자들은 당연히 많습니다. 이러한 개발자들은 jQuery를 기반으로 하며 모바일 웹 개발용으로 고안된 웹 프레임워크인 jQTouch를 기꺼이 학습할 것입니다. 이 기사에서는 모바일 웹 개발자들의 관점에서부터 jQTouch에 대해 살펴볼 것입니다.
Articles 07 Dec 2010
Mobile web application framework match-up, Part 2: Explore Cappuccino for mobile web app development
Web applications have been supplanting desktop applications for many years despite the fact that they are generally of lower quality than their desktop counterparts. Part of the reason for this discrepancy is the comparatively greater capabilities of desktop applications for running inside a browser. However, the feature and performance gap has shrunk rapidly with the recent advances in modern browsers and their implementation of the HTML5 specification. The other major reason has been that web developers have had to make do with much lower-level APIs than desktop developers. Cappuccino changes all of that by bringing the renowned Cocoa framework to web development, which makes it an especially attractive choice for mobile web developers. Decide for yourself if Cappuccino is a good fit for your next great mobile web application.
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Articles 23 Nov 2010
Mobile web application framework match-up, Part 1: Build mobile applications with SproutCore
Web applications have evolved significantly and are taking another leap forward with the advent of mobile web applications. Now more than ever, web applications are expected to provide a native experience -- one that is on par with native mobile applications. Though mobile web browsers provide the capabilities to make this possible, web development is still primitive when compared to native application development. SproutCore is a web application framework that aims to make developing for the web similar to developing a native application for a particular device. Explore SproutCore and examine it as a framework for building mobile web applications.
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Articles 19 Oct 2010
Clojure and concurrency
The Clojure programming language has gained a lot of attention recently. The attention, however, is not for some of the obvious reasons, such as it being a modern Lisp dialect or that it runs on top of the Java Virtual Machine. The features that are drawing many people to it are its concurrency features. Clojure is perhaps most well known for supporting the Software Transactional Memory (STM) model natively. STM, however, is not always the best solution for every concurrency problem. Clojure includes support for other paradigms in the form of agents and atoms. This article examines each of the concurrency approaches that Clojure provides and explores when each is most appropriate.
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Articles 14 Sep 2010
Business intelligence on the cheap with Apache Hadoop and Dojo, Part 1: Crunch your existing data using Apache Hadoop
Understanding your business is always important. Your company can be as agile as you want it to be, but if you do not know the right moves to make, you are driving with your eyes closed. Business intelligence solutions can be prohibitively expensive, and they often require you to retrofit your data to work with their systems. Open source technologies, however, make it easier than ever to create your own business intelligence reports. In this article, the first of a two-part series, learn how to crunch your existing data using Apache Hadoop and turn it into data that can be easily fed to a web-based reporting application.
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Articles 17 Aug 2010
Create rich data-centric web applications using JAX-RS, JPA, and Dojo
Developing a rich application for manipulating large amounts of data used to be the exclusive domain of desktop applications. Now it can be done in a web application, and you don't have to be a JavaScript guru to do it. Learn how to use the Dojo toolkit to create eye-popping, data-centric web applications and hook them up to a back end based on the JavaEE standards such as JAX-RS and JPA. These technologies allow you to leverage convention over configuration principles to easily wire together complex applications in no time at all.
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Articles 13 Jul 2010
Using Internet data in Android applications
Many of your Android applications will need to interact with Internet data, which comes in a variety of formats. In this article, build an Android application that works with two popular data formats -- XML and JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) -- as well as the more exotic protocol buffers format from Google. You'll learn about the performance and coding trade-offs associated with each format.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 29 Jun 2010
Create Ajax applications for the mobile Web
Developing for mobile devices has been a high cost, low return proposition for many years, despite the hype around it. The latest generation of smartphones powered by the iPhone OS and Google's Android provide a much simplified solution: just build Web applications. This gives you a one build for all devices approach, which can lower the cost. Even better, these high-end devices all offer ultra-modern browsers supporting advanced HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. In this article, learn how to build Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax)-heavy applications that take full advantage of the capabilities of modern smartphones. You will learn not only how to get the most out of these devices, but also how to deal with the subtle differences between them.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 02 Mar 2010
Build better Web applications with Google Sitebricks
Do you want to quickly build a Web application that can be maintained, or worked on, by other people? Google Sitebricks lets you rapidly develop Web applications that are built to last. Sitebricks uses dependency injection to do away with boilerplate code. It leverages type safety and inference to check the correctness of your application, so you catch problems at compile time instead of run time. In this article, learn how to build Web applications powered by Google Sitebricks.
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Articles 16 Feb 2010
The Clojure programming language
Lisp is a programming language known for its expressiveness and power, but it was often thought of as not being well suited for general use. That has all changed with Clojure, a Lisp dialect that runs on the Java platform. Now you can harness the power of Lisp anywhere that you have a Java Virtual Machine handy. In this article, you will see how to get started with Clojure, and learn some of its syntax, as you take advantage of the Clojure plug-in for Eclipse to help you along the way.
Also available in: Russian   Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 22 Sep 2009
Explore multithreaded programming in XUL
As you create cross-platform desktop applications using XUL, you also can enhance your skills with JavaScript, CSS, and even HTML. XUL's cross-platform capabilities are not a collection of least common denominator features. Instead, XUL gives you the kind of power that you might expect from a desktop application toolkit, including access to native threads. You can even access native threads directly from JavaScript, writing code that executes in parallel. In this article, you will examine the multithreading capabilities of XUL, and create an application that uses multiple threads to retrieve data. You will take a classic IO-bound application, one that accesses multiple remote data sources over the Internet, and speed it up through multiple threads in XUL. The application will allow users to view and compare anonymous results of three popular search engines: Google, Yahoo, and Bing from Microsoft(R).
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Articles 01 Sep 2009
Scala on your phone
The Android operating system provides a powerful, open platform for mobile development. It leverages the power of the Java programming language and the Eclipse tools platform. Now you can add the Scala programming language to that mix. In this article, you will see how you can use Scala as the primary development language on Android, allowing you to write mobile applications using a more expressive but also more type-safe programming language.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 30 Jun 2009
Developing with Comet and Java
Explore the different implementations of developing with Comet. See how popular Java Web servers like Jetty and Tomcat have enabled Comet applications, and learn how to program with each server. And finally, learn about the standardization proposals for Comet in Java that are part of the upcoming Servlet 3.0 and JavaEE 6 specifications.
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Articles 26 May 2009
Realities of open source cloud computing, Part 3: Managing the cloud
You've picked the perfect cloud computing platform for your needs, and you have a well-designed application to run on it. The hard part is done, right? Not so fast. You still need to consider all the things you'd typically worry about if the application was for your own servers: deployment, testing, and monitoring. This might be intimidating, since your application will run on somebody else's machines (which you might not have access to, or know much about). In this final part of the "Realities of open source cloud computing" series, learn about several open source tools and technologies to help you administer your application in a cloud.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 05 May 2009
Realities of open source cloud computing, Part 2: Developing for the cloud
You've probably heard the phrase "Write once, run anywhere." But if you want to write for an application that runs in a cloud, you really have to know what you're doing. In Part 2 of this "Realities of open source cloud computing" series, learn how to write an application using PHP to run on the Aptana cloud computing platform. Explore some of the critical design differences between a cloud application and a traditional N-tier application. The concepts are illustrated with a seemingly simple application, using familiar open source technologies, that taps into the strengths of cloud computing.
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Articles 14 Apr 2009
Realities of open source cloud computing, Part 1: Not all clouds are equal
Your CTO wants to know your cloud computing strategy -- and wants to know it tomorrow. There are a lot of choices, with many differences and similarities. This article explores some of the options for an organization that wants to leverage the power and promise of cloud computing, with a focus on open source technologies. Learn about several of the providers, such as Amazon, Microsoft, Google, IBM, Aptana, Heroku, Mosso, Ning, and Salesforce. Review the relative strengths and weaknesses of each platform, and what types of open source and proprietary technologies are supported on each platform. Learn how to pick the platform that fits your needs.
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Articles 07 Apr 2009
Build Comet applications using Scala, Lift, and jQuery
Web applications have gotten more and more advanced, and users are always expecting more out of them. One of the most advanced features is Comet, also known as reverse Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) or server-side push. Comet allows for browser-based instant messaging, real-time stock quotes, and so on. Advanced Ajax libraries, such as jQuery, make it easy to write Comet applications on the client side, but getting them to scale on the server is still a challenge. That is where the Scala programming language and the Lift Web application framework can step in and deliver a scalable back end for your Comet application. In this tutorial, build a real-time Web auction using these technologies.
Tutorial 24 Mar 2009
Using E4X on the server-side with Jaxer
The ECMAScript for XML (E4X) standard gives JavaScript developers a powerful API to work with XML. As it is not supported in Internet Explorer, you might not get to use it often. That is not an issue if you use JavaScript on the server with Jaxer. In this article, you see how JavaScript and E4X make it easy to work with XML on the server. Combine this key ingredient with Jaxer to create Ajax applications using nothing but JavaScript.
Also available in: Chinese   Japanese  
Articles 03 Mar 2009
Rich Internet Applications with Grails, Part 1: Build a Web application using Grails and Flex
Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) promise the dynamism and functionality of desktop applications through the browser. One of the key characteristics is moving your presentation layer to the client and backing it with a robust RESTful service layer on the server. This idea is being popularized with buzzwords like SOUI (Service Oriented User Interface) and SOFEA (Service Oriented Front End Architecture). In this article, the first of a two-part series, you will see how simple it is to create a Web service back end using Groovy's Grails Web application framework, and you will hook it up to an RIA developed with Adobe's Flex framework.
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Articles 24 Feb 2009
Offline Ajax with Apache Derby
People love Ajax applications so much that they are willing to use them instead of their desktop equivalents. The only problem occurs when they fail to have network access. This is when an offline feature is necessary. Apache Derby is a great option for enabling offline access to Ajax-powered applications. Learn how to use Apache Derby as a local data store that can be used to take your Ajax application offline.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 23 Sep 2008
Rapid prototyping with Apache Derby and JRuby on Rails
Ruby on Rails has raised the bar in terms of rapid development of data-driven Web sites. The JRuby project is making Ruby faster and more scalable than ever. One of the great advantages to running Rails on the Java Virtual Machine is that you can leverage other Java libraries, like the Apache Derby embedded database. The combination of Derby, JRuby, and Rails allows for rapid prototyping of dynamic Web applications. Learn how to use these technologies together to help you prototype your next great idea.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 26 Aug 2008
Creating mashups on the Google App Engine using Eclipse, Part 3: Using RESTful Web services
Social networks are making it easier to take data and mash it up to create innovative Web applications. You still, however, must deal with all the usual issues with creating a scalable Web application. Now the Google App Engine (GAE) makes that easier for you. With it, you can forget all about managing pools of application servers, and, instead, you can concentrate on creating a great mashup. In this article, the last of a three-part "Creating mashups on the Google App Engine using Eclipse" series, we will take the application built in the first two parts and further enhance it. We will add the ability to view other users of the app and subscribe to their aggregate feeds. We will then complete the mashup circle by exposing the app as a Web service that can be used by other mashups.
Articles 19 Aug 2008
WSAS and Eclipse simplify creating Web services
We find Web services everywhere today. There's a good chance you will need to create Web services for whatever new applications or features you are developing. And it was not too long ago that this could be a painful proposition. WSO2 realized this and created an Eclipse plug-in to help make working with Web services easier. This article explores the WSO2 Web Services Application Server (WSAS) Eclipse plug-in and how it can help you develop Web services.
Also available in: Japanese  
Articles 04 Mar 2008
Developing applications using the Eclipse C/C++ Development Toolkit
When most people think "Eclipse," they think "Java IDE." Eclipse is much more. With the proper plug-ins, one can use Eclipse to work with PHP, Ruby, and Groovy, C, and C++. In this article, you get started with the Eclipse C/C++ Development Toolkit (CDT). We build a simple application in C++ using the CDT and the C++ Standard Template Library (STL) to streamline the process and take advantage of some of the powerful features of C++.
Also available in: Japanese   Portuguese  
Articles 10 Jul 2007
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