Comentários (3)

1 rfkrishnan comentou às Link permanente

Really, there's no open source video editing software of any quality in this day and age?

2 AdamLaz comentou às Link permanente

@rfkirshnan -- There is one that's almost worth mentioning, though I didn't mention it because the others are better. <br /> http://www.lightworksbeta.com/ - I've only used it briefly just to try it out. I was surprised how good it was, but I'm a loyal Adobe Creative Suite user so I'm partial to Adobe Premier. Really, though, for most cases Microsoft's MovieMaker and Apple's iMovie should be sufficient.

3 LauraK. comentou às Link permanente

Adam -- Great post. Video captions are also an important component of creating rich content that everyone can benefit from in all circumstances and environments. Captions provide basic access for people who are deaf and hard of hearing; enhance comprehension for non-native language speakers; and provide optimal flexibility for mobile workers who often find themselves either in noisy (e.g., airports) or noise-sensitive (e.g., client offices) environments. <div>&nbsp;</div> Individual content creators with an existing transcript file can add captions in YouTube by following instructions provided on this page: http://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&amp;answer=100077. <div>&nbsp;</div> YouTube also provides some assistance for those who do not have a transcript file and would like help creating captions. To learn more visit, http://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&amp;answer=100076. <div>&nbsp;</div> Finally, public- and private-sector enterprises that need a longer term solution can learn more about the IBM Research asset, AbilityLab Media Captioner &amp; Editor, by visiting the projects page on the Human Ability and Accessibility Center website at http://www-03.ibm.com/able/accessibility_research_projects/captionereditor.html. <div>&nbsp;</div> Thanks again for all the other great tips!