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1 clea63 commented Permalink

Hi Greeg, I have looked at the quantitative decision modelling and find it interesting that people prefer that type of model to a more intuitive based model. For example, while one strategy may have considered SNA vs. TCPIP and SNA came out better, it may be that the person doing the analysis knows that TCPIP is the wave of the future and utilizes a more intuitive approach to the pure decision model. Thank you, nice analysis! --Clea (zolo ~AT~ us.ibm.com)

2 greggasmith commented Permalink

Thanks for the Comment Clea. <div>&nbsp;</div> I just wanted to respond and say that the final output of a decision model is not absolute. The result is a score with the results weighted based on your Decision Criteria (options). If 'modern/future' technologies is important, maybe a Decision Criteria like 'Future Proof Solution' should be added and given an appropriate weight. <div>&nbsp;</div> A decision model can be as strong or as weak as you make it. If you put more effort you put into documenting and weighting your nice-to-haves and must-haves, you can be sure that the final result will be more reflective of your organizations intentions.