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1 PatF. commented Permalink

That's actually three questions you're asking, but I'll give them a go.

 
Here’s the extent of Apple’s application review process, from the 28-page Registered Apple Developer Agreement: “Applications must not contain any malware, malicious or harmful code, program, or other internal component (e.g. computer viruses, trojan horses, "backdoors") which (sic) could damage, destroy, or adversely affect other software, firmware, hardware, data, systems, services, or networks.” Later the document states that if a developer does submit an app that contains malware, then the *developer* is liable for damages, not Apple. Not exactly rigorous monitoring, if the only check is a signature from someone wanting to sell something.
 
The bottom line from the App Store Terms and Conditions (http://www.apple.com/legal/itunes/us/terms.html#APPS) is that although “certain Products include security technology that limits your use of Products”, Apple isn’t responsible for damages of any kind, and Apple doesn’t guarantee that the App Store products are virus-free or invulnerable to security breaches. Even in the U.S. states that forbid limitation of liability, the most Apple will pay is $50. You’re on your own, basically.
 
Also, Apple devices and services cannot be taken into certain countries and regions, which might include some IBM territories. (Not to mention that the iTunes Store isn’t to be used outside the U.S.--horrors!)
 
Third, does IBM or any business want a potential competitor collecting usage and more personal data from its employees? (“When you share your content with family and friends using Apple products, send gift certificates and products, or invite others to join you on Apple forums, Apple may collect the information you provide about those people such as name, mailing address, email address, and phone number.”)
 
I couldn’t find any stats on malware for Apple devices, but evidence suggests that the numbers are increasing exponentially as more of these machines are sold (see http://www.smh.com.au/technology/security/mac-malware-alert-apple-devices-easier-to-infect-than-windows-20110523-1ezoc.html for one example).
 
Great post!