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1 ChrisLaffra commented Permalink

I have had quite a few discussions with people now on why EGL Rich UI needs an Ajax proxy. Please consult this blog entry for an explanation of what the proxy does exactly and why it is there: <a class="jive-link-external" href="http://www-949.ibm.com/software/rational/cafe/blogs/egl-rich-web/2009/09/10/web-security-and-why-egl-rich-ui-needs-an-ajax-proxy">http://www-949.ibm.com/software/rational/cafe/blogs/egl-rich-web/2009/09/10/web-security-and-why-egl-rich-ui-needs-an-ajax-proxy</a>

2 JoePluta commented Permalink

I absolutely understand why the Ajax proxy is there and what benefits it provides, Chris. It's a powerful concept and it avoids some of the rather kludgy workarounds in the Web 2.0 world (such as the IMG source magic for GoogleApis).<div>&nbsp;</div> At the same time, I did want to make sure that I could honestly tell someone that an EGL Rich UI architecture can be created using only EGL Rich UI and RPG, with no Java whatsoever. I certainly don't recommend it; my services are so thin that they add very little overhead and so running a Web application server (WebSphere or Tomcat) is not a problem. But it's important to be able to counter any claim that EGL <b>requires</b> WebSphere or Tomcat. And with your help, I've done that.<div>&nbsp;</div> And when I post my project, everyone will have an example of a proxy written in RPG.