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Java Web services: JAXB and JAX-WS in Axis2
Apache Axis2 supports a range of data-binding technologies, including the official Java standard, JAXB 2.x. Axis2 also supports the Java standard for Web service configuration, JAX-WS 2.x, as an alternative to its own custom configuration technique. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services column series by demonstrating how you can use each of these Java standards with Axis2 and discussing some of the limitations of Axis2's current support for them.
Also available in: Chinese   Russian   Vietnamese   Portuguese  
Articles 15 Sep 2009
Java Web services: Introducing Metro
The Metro Web service stack provides a comprehensive solution for accessing and implementing Web services. It's based on the reference implementations of the JAXB 2.x and JAX-WS 2.x Java standards, with added components to support WS-* SOAP extension technologies and actual Web service deployment. This article continues Dennis Sosnoski's Java Web services column series with a look at the basic principles of Metro client and server development.
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Articles 03 Nov 2009
Java web services: Introducing CXF
The Apache CXF web services stack supports JAXB 2.x data binding (along with some alternative data bindings) and JAX-WS 2.x service configuration. Like the Metro JAXB/JAX-WS alternative discussed in earlier columns, CXF uses XML files to extend the JAX-WS configuration information. In this article, Java web services series author Dennis Sosnoski looks into the basics of working with CXF for client and server development.
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Articles 09 Feb 2010
Java Web services: Metro vs. Axis2 performance
The Metro Web services stack provides the same functionality as the Axis2 stack but, aside from the optional use of JAXB and JAX-WS in Axis2, uses completely different implementations of the technologies involved. In this article, Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java Web services column series with a performance comparison between the Metro and Axis2 stacks, both with and without WS-Security.
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Articles 19 Jan 2010
Java Web services: WS-Security with Metro
The Metro Web services stack is based on the reference implementations of the JAXB 2.x and JAX-WS 2.x Java standards but also includes support for a full range of WS-* SOAP extension technologies. This article continues Dennis Sosnoski's Java Web services column series with coverage of WS-Security configuration and usage in Metro.
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Articles 01 Dec 2009
Introduction to Service Data Objects
If you think the J2EE programming models and APIs force developers to spend too much time on technology-specific configuration, programming, and debugging, then this article is for you! Many Java developers are skeptical about how heterogeneous data can be accessed uniformly, and have been disappointed in the various programming frameworks that propose to solve the problem. In this article, Java developers Bertrand Portier and Frank Budinsky introduce you to next-generation data programming with Service Data Objects (SDO).
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Articles 28 Sep 2004
Java web services: The state of web service security
WS-Security and related standards provide a wide range of options for web service security. Of this wide range, web services stacks test only a limited number of security configurations, and even fewer configurations for interoperability, on their own. Find out what the industry has done to promote interoperability among web services stacks, and read a summary comparison of how the three main open source Java stacks handle security.
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Articles 07 Dec 2010
Java web services: WS-Security without client certificates
WS-Security symmetric encryption lets you secure message exchanges between client and server without requiring client certificates, simplifying your web service configuration while also providing performance benefits. You can use it directly or in the bootstrap for WS-SecureConversation exchanges. In this article, you'll learn how to configure and use symmetric encryption with the three main open source Java web services stacks: Axis2, Metro, and CXF. You'll also see how plain WS-Security symmetric encryption performance compares to WS-SecureConversation performance.
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Articles 03 Aug 2010
Java web services: WS-SecureConversation performance
WS-SecureConversation lets you secure ongoing web service message exchanges with less processing overhead than plain WS-Security. In this article, you'll learn how to configure and use WS-SecureConversation with the three main open source Java web services stacks: Apache Axis2, Metro, and Apache CXF. You'll also see how the three stacks compare on WS-SecureConversation performance.
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Articles 22 Jun 2010
Java web services: CXF performance comparison
Apache CXF shares certain underlying components with both Apache Axis2 and Metro but combines the components within an entirely different architecture. Dennis Sosnoski continues his Java web services column series by comparing how the CXF, Metro, and Axis2 stacks perform both with and without WS-Security.
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Articles 27 Apr 2010
Java Web Services: Axis2 Data Binding
The Apache Axis2 Web services framework was designed from the start to support multiple XML data-binding approaches. The current release provides full support for XMLBeans and JiBX data binding, as well as the custom Axis Data Binding (ADB) approach developed specifically for Axis2. This article shows you how to use these different data bindings with Axis2 and explains why you might prefer one over the others for your application.
Also available in: Portuguese  
Articles 26 Jul 2007
Developing long term strategies for using Java EE technology
Changes to technology are inevitable and necessary, and some of these changes could affect how your existing applications operate. Such inevitability might make it seem risky to commit to technologies that are driven by changing specifications, such as Java EE. However, it is possible to minimize the impact of incompatible changes with informed choices and good planning when determining which technologies are appropriate for you to use. This article offers information to help you make those informed choices, and also explains what IBM does to minimize the impact of these changes to your organization.
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Articles 14 May 2008
Design and develop JAX-WS 2.0 web services
Using Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS) technology to design and develop web services yields many benefits, including simplifying the construction of web services and web service clients in Java, easing the development and deployment of web services, and speeding up web services development. This tutorial walks you through how to do all of this and more by developing a sample order-processing application that exposes its functionality as web services. After going through this tutorial, you'll be able to apply these concepts and your newly acquired knowledge to develop web services for your application using JAX-WS technology.
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Tutorial 20 Sep 2007
XML and Java technology: XML persistence in three flavors
You can do all sorts of interesting things with XML, but if you can't persist it to a file, it's all for naught. Brett McLaughlin discusses different tactics for XML persistence, and the pros and cons of each.
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Articles 11 Sep 2007
Practically Groovy: Mark it up with Groovy Builders
Groovy Builders let you mimic markup languages like XML, HTML, Ant tasks, and even GUIs with frameworks like Swing.They're especially useful for rapid prototyping and, as Practically Groovy columnist Andrew Glover shows you this month, they're a handy alternative to data binding frameworks when you need consumable markup in a snap!
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Articles 12 Apr 2005
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