Topic
  • 8 replies
  • Latest Post - ‏2014-11-19T00:00:00Z by aakash_203
Chief_Max
Chief_Max
28 Posts

Pinned topic Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

‏2013-09-04T13:22:40Z |

My background is with HP products like ITG/PPM/Service Desk. I haven't been using Maximo for nearly as long as some of you folks on the forums, so maybe someone can explain this: Maximo has Cron Tasks that are executed at a certain time and frequency - I get that. Escalations, to me, is a trigger point at which the request is raised to the next higher level in the form of a notification and/or assignment. In Maximo, Escalations instead seem to behave just like cron tasks.

Maybe, if one goes back in time, there is a reason why Escalations changed to be more like Cron Tasks. It would help me understand the system better if I knew: Why have both?

  • bgbaird
    bgbaird
    281 Posts
    ACCEPTED ANSWER

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-04T13:56:10Z  

    Hi Max,

    Here's the way I parse it out in my mind:

    An escalation defines events and actions.

    The Cron task for that escalation tells it to go check.

    I can have an escalation (XYZ) that looks at a record where the changedate is within the last 24 hours, and if it is, do something.

    When I configure escalation XYZ, I set up the cron schedule as part of the escalation.

    There will be a new cron task called "ESCXYZ" that executes based on the schedule I set up in the escalation.

    The CRON object is merely a scheduling tool.

    I hope that helps.

     

    Brian

     

  • BKDowning
    BKDowning
    18 Posts
    ACCEPTED ANSWER

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-12T18:21:52Z  
    • Chief_Max
    • ‏2013-09-11T23:37:36Z

    I would be interested to know why it is called 'escalation'. I guess it's shorter than saying, "Thing that defines events and actions." Digging into my Cron Task Setup, I see many jobs, and opening up one of them, I see it is the main cron task that runs the escalations. There are several dozen of these Cron Task Instance Names, all aligning to an escalation. The thing I find confusing and curious, is that each escalation has a schedule, but as I dig into the Cron Task Setup, the Cron Task of which is called ESCALATION, I see each Cron Task Instance Name also has a schedule associated. This seems redundant. It would make sense to have a cron task that triggers other processes, and each of those processes have their own schedule - it's odd that the schedule is in the escalation as well as the cron task instance name.

    Every application has its history and its peculiarities - why some of it's 'features' behave the way they do; understanding that background gives one insight into why it was made the way it is, and how to better use the system.

    The Cron Task Setup application allows you to set up more than one cron job for things OTHER than Escalations.  The Escalation cron task then takes the various escalation points and creates instances using the scheduling defined in the Escalations application.  This is not redundant.  The escalation application defines the schedule, the cron task instantiates it. 

    Originally when the Escalation application was introduced, the thought was (from a process perspective) to "escalate" the artifact (i.e. SR, Incident., WO etc.) to the next point in the process; whether that was to a higher-level decision maker or not was beside the point.  The process was the important thing.  So then based on the event you define, the artifact moved automatically via the cron task instance.  The use of the word escalation stuck.  Now any event you define is called an escalation.

  • bgbaird
    bgbaird
    281 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-04T13:56:10Z  

    Hi Max,

    Here's the way I parse it out in my mind:

    An escalation defines events and actions.

    The Cron task for that escalation tells it to go check.

    I can have an escalation (XYZ) that looks at a record where the changedate is within the last 24 hours, and if it is, do something.

    When I configure escalation XYZ, I set up the cron schedule as part of the escalation.

    There will be a new cron task called "ESCXYZ" that executes based on the schedule I set up in the escalation.

    The CRON object is merely a scheduling tool.

    I hope that helps.

     

    Brian

     

  • Chief_Max
    Chief_Max
    28 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-11T23:37:36Z  
    • bgbaird
    • ‏2013-09-04T13:56:10Z

    Hi Max,

    Here's the way I parse it out in my mind:

    An escalation defines events and actions.

    The Cron task for that escalation tells it to go check.

    I can have an escalation (XYZ) that looks at a record where the changedate is within the last 24 hours, and if it is, do something.

    When I configure escalation XYZ, I set up the cron schedule as part of the escalation.

    There will be a new cron task called "ESCXYZ" that executes based on the schedule I set up in the escalation.

    The CRON object is merely a scheduling tool.

    I hope that helps.

     

    Brian

     

    I would be interested to know why it is called 'escalation'. I guess it's shorter than saying, "Thing that defines events and actions." Digging into my Cron Task Setup, I see many jobs, and opening up one of them, I see it is the main cron task that runs the escalations. There are several dozen of these Cron Task Instance Names, all aligning to an escalation. The thing I find confusing and curious, is that each escalation has a schedule, but as I dig into the Cron Task Setup, the Cron Task of which is called ESCALATION, I see each Cron Task Instance Name also has a schedule associated. This seems redundant. It would make sense to have a cron task that triggers other processes, and each of those processes have their own schedule - it's odd that the schedule is in the escalation as well as the cron task instance name.

    Every application has its history and its peculiarities - why some of it's 'features' behave the way they do; understanding that background gives one insight into why it was made the way it is, and how to better use the system.

  • BKDowning
    BKDowning
    18 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-12T18:21:52Z  
    • Chief_Max
    • ‏2013-09-11T23:37:36Z

    I would be interested to know why it is called 'escalation'. I guess it's shorter than saying, "Thing that defines events and actions." Digging into my Cron Task Setup, I see many jobs, and opening up one of them, I see it is the main cron task that runs the escalations. There are several dozen of these Cron Task Instance Names, all aligning to an escalation. The thing I find confusing and curious, is that each escalation has a schedule, but as I dig into the Cron Task Setup, the Cron Task of which is called ESCALATION, I see each Cron Task Instance Name also has a schedule associated. This seems redundant. It would make sense to have a cron task that triggers other processes, and each of those processes have their own schedule - it's odd that the schedule is in the escalation as well as the cron task instance name.

    Every application has its history and its peculiarities - why some of it's 'features' behave the way they do; understanding that background gives one insight into why it was made the way it is, and how to better use the system.

    The Cron Task Setup application allows you to set up more than one cron job for things OTHER than Escalations.  The Escalation cron task then takes the various escalation points and creates instances using the scheduling defined in the Escalations application.  This is not redundant.  The escalation application defines the schedule, the cron task instantiates it. 

    Originally when the Escalation application was introduced, the thought was (from a process perspective) to "escalate" the artifact (i.e. SR, Incident., WO etc.) to the next point in the process; whether that was to a higher-level decision maker or not was beside the point.  The process was the important thing.  So then based on the event you define, the artifact moved automatically via the cron task instance.  The use of the word escalation stuck.  Now any event you define is called an escalation.

  • Chief_Max
    Chief_Max
    28 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-12T18:31:36Z  
    • BKDowning
    • ‏2013-09-12T18:21:52Z

    The Cron Task Setup application allows you to set up more than one cron job for things OTHER than Escalations.  The Escalation cron task then takes the various escalation points and creates instances using the scheduling defined in the Escalations application.  This is not redundant.  The escalation application defines the schedule, the cron task instantiates it. 

    Originally when the Escalation application was introduced, the thought was (from a process perspective) to "escalate" the artifact (i.e. SR, Incident., WO etc.) to the next point in the process; whether that was to a higher-level decision maker or not was beside the point.  The process was the important thing.  So then based on the event you define, the artifact moved automatically via the cron task instance.  The use of the word escalation stuck.  Now any event you define is called an escalation.

    Bradley and Brian thanks - your answers are helpful and informative!

    -Greg

  • maximo_TND
    maximo_TND
    79 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-14T06:43:30Z  
    • Chief_Max
    • ‏2013-09-12T18:31:36Z

    Bradley and Brian thanks - your answers are helpful and informative!

    -Greg

    Hello,

    If I define an Escalation then I see some issue when I migrate it. That when I migrate the Escalation then at the time of activation, System shows me error - No Instance of this cron task found.

    Which means for this escalation system is creating a cron task instance.

    May I know where can I find that? is it in crontaskinstance?

    -

     

    Updated on 2013-09-14T06:43:53Z at 2013-09-14T06:43:53Z by maximo_TND
  • bgbaird
    bgbaird
    281 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-16T00:55:36Z  

    Hello,

    If I define an Escalation then I see some issue when I migrate it. That when I migrate the Escalation then at the time of activation, System shows me error - No Instance of this cron task found.

    Which means for this escalation system is creating a cron task instance.

    May I know where can I find that? is it in crontaskinstance?

    -

     

    I migrate escalations in the inactive state.  Activating them makes a cron task.

     

    Brian

  • maximo_TND
    maximo_TND
    79 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2013-09-16T05:21:38Z  
    • bgbaird
    • ‏2013-09-16T00:55:36Z

    I migrate escalations in the inactive state.  Activating them makes a cron task.

     

    Brian

    Yes I do. But when I try to activate it in the target env then it throws me error related to Instance.

     

     

  • aakash_203
    aakash_203
    5 Posts

    Re: Difference betw. Escalation and Cron Task

    ‏2014-11-19T00:00:00Z  

    I agree with all the above answers, and would like to add few more points, which I think would help to understand the functional differences.

    >>

    The most important difference between Escalation and Crontask is "why would the job/task is instantiated", that is associated with the Crontask or the Escalation.

    >>

    The Task associated with an Escalation is instantiated only when a specific condition is met. Where as a Crontask don't check for any conditions to instantiate the job.

    >>

    Example for a Crontask is synchronizing LDAP user ids.

    Example for an escalation is to send an email to the supervisor, when the Workorder is not completed after certain number of days.

    >>

    Crontask is primarily aimed at executing regular Batch Jobs. 

    While Escalation is also a Batch Job, but the primary focus is to facilitate ITIL functionality.

    >>

    Technically Maximo implements all the Crontasks as an escalation. But Functionally they are different.

    Updated on 2014-11-19T00:01:52Z at 2014-11-19T00:01:52Z by aakash_203