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kolban
kolban
3322 Posts

Pinned topic Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

‏2014-06-14T19:10:15Z | bpmexplorer

Good folks,

I have been working on a pet project for a while and want to release it to y'all now.  I call it "BPM Explorer".  What it is is a Windows application that connects to a BPM Server and allows us to see information about our BPM environments.  My plan is to continue to add features to it on request.  Currently, it provides a table list of tasks and processes, shows their details including the values of variables set within them.  It has a whole bunch of other bells and whistles.

Full details of the app and its download can be found here:

http://neilkolban.com/ibm/bpm-explorer/

I'd like to use this thread for discussions upon it.   Problems and wishlists get the highest priority.

I hope you can find some value within it.  Looking forward to hearing back from you.

Neil

  • Samuel Chan
    Samuel Chan
    467 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-16T03:07:38Z  

    I've got it working now :) It does exactly what it says on the box.

    I'm not sure what's happening in the background, but on our development environments, the REST API has a little bit of latency. I'm not sure how many (and which) requests are being made, but there the application hangs until the network responds. EDIT: might need better visibility/feedback about what is happening back to the user.

    I think that you cannot change users and have the list correctly update to the new user's tasks until you restart the app.

    The app should load tasks when first opened.

    Is there a way to have the list display every task on the server? So it's like the inspector in Designer. And yes, that will likely require a password manager like Designer. Because of the many users involved in any process, this will become handy.

    Finally, I suspect that every time the selection changes in the instance list, the entire remote call is made again. There should be an amount of caching, and perhaps a column to indicate how long ago the data was last retrieved. This should eliminate the amount of latency when just switching between two instances.

    In addition to the previous point, data should be more lazily loaded in order to speed up application response times.

    More wishlist stuff:

    Starring/favouriting of instances
    Searching/filtering of instances

     

    That's it for now :)

    Cheers,
    Sam.

    Updated on 2014-06-16T03:47:23Z at 2014-06-16T03:47:23Z by Samuel Chan
  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-16T14:41:38Z  

    I've got it working now :) It does exactly what it says on the box.

    I'm not sure what's happening in the background, but on our development environments, the REST API has a little bit of latency. I'm not sure how many (and which) requests are being made, but there the application hangs until the network responds. EDIT: might need better visibility/feedback about what is happening back to the user.

    I think that you cannot change users and have the list correctly update to the new user's tasks until you restart the app.

    The app should load tasks when first opened.

    Is there a way to have the list display every task on the server? So it's like the inspector in Designer. And yes, that will likely require a password manager like Designer. Because of the many users involved in any process, this will become handy.

    Finally, I suspect that every time the selection changes in the instance list, the entire remote call is made again. There should be an amount of caching, and perhaps a column to indicate how long ago the data was last retrieved. This should eliminate the amount of latency when just switching between two instances.

    In addition to the previous point, data should be more lazily loaded in order to speed up application response times.

    More wishlist stuff:

    Starring/favouriting of instances
    Searching/filtering of instances

     

    That's it for now :)

    Cheers,
    Sam.

    Sam ... you are awesome.  Ive update the project's wish list with the new goodies

    Let me spend some time and respond to what you wrote ...

     

    I'm not sure what's happening in the background, but on our development environments, the REST API has a little bit of latency. I'm not sure how many (and which) requests are being made, but there the application hangs until the network responds.

     

    I did all my testing on my local machine where BPM is running.  Obviously this is not a heavily loaded environment and there is zero latency between BPM Explorer and the server.  I'm afraid I shot myself in the foot here.  The app is written in java and uses the new Java 8 JavaFX UI technology.  In that environment, when an "event" happens (such as a mouse click or list selection change), a callback occurs and my code handles that callback.  The callback (in many cases) makes a REST request back to IBM BPM and, while that is happening, BPM Explorer as a whole is "locked out".  This means that no other buttons can be pressed and (likely) the app will not redraw itself.  This is simply bad design on my part.  JavaFX has a whole concept known as "Worker Threads" which can perform work while allowing the UI as a whole to remain responsive.  So far, I have taken the "simplest route" which is to perform all my REST calls on the UI thread.  The reason this is simplest is that while making the REST calls, I don't have to concern myself with parallelism.  However ... the result of this may be the perceived sluggishness of which you speak.  The good news is that this is fixable.  Now ... a little more on the back-story of this app.  I entertain myself with these kinds of projects and some are useful and some simply wither and die on the vine because at the time I felt them either "fun" or "useful" but the reality was that others didn't find as much value.  In that vein, what I have been doing is "getting something out quickly" and if there is interest, coming back to polish and improve it.  What this means is that projects that don't resonate don't get time spent on them while ones that do, get the attention.  The impact of this is that "low hanging fruit" of the tool will get attended to VERY quickly.  Things that I find extremely useful or improve my own job, also get done quickly... however ... is there is low demand or interest in either a feature (or a project), it gets put on the back burner.  The upshot of this is that the more folks who say "I want to use this tool but the latency hurts", the quicker it gets fixed.

     

    I think that you cannot change users and have the list correctly update to the new user's tasks until you restart the app.

     

    I haven't tried, but if you change the userid that is used to connect and then execute a refresh of the task list, the list should now show what is able to be seen by that user.

     

    The app should load tasks when first opened.

     

    Fully agreed.  That will be in the next release.

     

    Is there a way to have the list display every task on the server? So it's like the inspector in Designer. And yes, that will likely require a password manager like Designer. Because of the many users involved in any process, this will become handy.

     

    I think the tool can be used to show every task on the server.  See searching later in this post.

     

    Finally, I suspect that every time the selection changes in the instance list, the entire remote call is made again. There should be an amount of caching, and perhaps a column to indicate how long ago the data was last retrieved. This should eliminate the amount of latency when just switching between two instances.

     

    You are 100% right in that every time a new task or process instance is selected, a new set of REST requests are indeed made back to BPM.  I had assumed that these would be so quick that there wouldn't be any pain but it sounds like that may have been an oversight.  Ive added caching of results with both a configurable lifespan (eg. 0 = never cache) and a force reload option to the wish list.

     

    In addition to the previous point, data should be more lazily loaded in order to speed up application response times.

     

    See previous section on synchronous calling.  Today I execute calls synchronously to the BPM server.  In principle, I can make both asynchronous calls and also paging capabilities.  When you run a query, approx how many results do you get back?

     

    Starring/favouriting of instances

     

    Noted.

     

    Searching/filtering of instances

     

    We can provide a search filter for the BPM results returned.  Right click the table and select "Select Search...".  However, I get the impression that what is wanted is maybe to "find" a result within the results returned.  That will be added to the wish list.
    Again ... MANY thanks for the responses.  Hopefully interest in this tool (or its potential) will be high and that will keep its development fueled.  It feels like holiday time with all the new presents these days.  8.5.5, new Coach technologies, Case management etc etc.
    Updated on 2014-06-16T14:42:01Z at 2014-06-16T14:42:01Z by kolban
  • Vivekananth Thangavelu
    139 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-16T15:35:21Z  

    Hi Neil,

    Amazing stuff... had a chance to test this out today. Wanted to ask whether there is a consolidated list of features/functionality for the current release of the BPM Explorer.

     

    Wishlist:

    • Multiple Sever Configuration
    • Server Heartbeat

    thanks,

    Vivek

     

     

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-16T15:41:32Z  

    Hi Neil,

    Amazing stuff... had a chance to test this out today. Wanted to ask whether there is a consolidated list of features/functionality for the current release of the BPM Explorer.

     

    Wishlist:

    • Multiple Sever Configuration
    • Server Heartbeat

    thanks,

    Vivek

     

     

    Hi Vivek,

    The documentation for BPM Explorer is currently found here.

    http://neilkolban.com/ibm/bpm-explorer/

    However it is lagging behind the code base right now so I'll work on that tonight.  As for functions and features in a table list ... I'll have a go at that too.  What I found is that as I personally tinker with IBM BPM, I "like" to have my tools in a single place and hence as I find something that I want, I add it to the tool.  The wishlist for others also gets high priority.

    Multiple Server Configuration ... Thank you!!  I hadn't even considered that but it seems obvious :-) ... That will be done.

    For the server heartbeat ... my understanding would be that BPM Explorer would "ping" BPM every configurable amount of time and if IBM fails to respond then what we would want is a dialog to appear saying that BPM is not responding.  Is that what you mean?

    Neil

  • Vivekananth Thangavelu
    139 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-16T15:45:47Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-06-16T15:41:32Z

    Hi Vivek,

    The documentation for BPM Explorer is currently found here.

    http://neilkolban.com/ibm/bpm-explorer/

    However it is lagging behind the code base right now so I'll work on that tonight.  As for functions and features in a table list ... I'll have a go at that too.  What I found is that as I personally tinker with IBM BPM, I "like" to have my tools in a single place and hence as I find something that I want, I add it to the tool.  The wishlist for others also gets high priority.

    Multiple Server Configuration ... Thank you!!  I hadn't even considered that but it seems obvious :-) ... That will be done.

    For the server heartbeat ... my understanding would be that BPM Explorer would "ping" BPM every configurable amount of time and if IBM fails to respond then what we would want is a dialog to appear saying that BPM is not responding.  Is that what you mean?

    Neil

    Hi Neil,

    Wow.. that reply was fast.. will go thorough the documentation.. yes your description on the heartbeat is exactly what I meant. Will think if more wishlist features.

    Thanks,

    Vivek

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-19T04:13:19Z  

    Hi Neil,

    Wow.. that reply was fast.. will go thorough the documentation.. yes your description on the heartbeat is exactly what I meant. Will think if more wishlist features.

    Thanks,

    Vivek

    Vivek,

    Heartbeat has now been implemented but not yet shipped.  Will be in next release for sure.

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-19T04:15:16Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-06-16T14:41:38Z
    Sam ... you are awesome.  Ive update the project's wish list with the new goodies

    Let me spend some time and respond to what you wrote ...

     

    I'm not sure what's happening in the background, but on our development environments, the REST API has a little bit of latency. I'm not sure how many (and which) requests are being made, but there the application hangs until the network responds.

     

    I did all my testing on my local machine where BPM is running.  Obviously this is not a heavily loaded environment and there is zero latency between BPM Explorer and the server.  I'm afraid I shot myself in the foot here.  The app is written in java and uses the new Java 8 JavaFX UI technology.  In that environment, when an "event" happens (such as a mouse click or list selection change), a callback occurs and my code handles that callback.  The callback (in many cases) makes a REST request back to IBM BPM and, while that is happening, BPM Explorer as a whole is "locked out".  This means that no other buttons can be pressed and (likely) the app will not redraw itself.  This is simply bad design on my part.  JavaFX has a whole concept known as "Worker Threads" which can perform work while allowing the UI as a whole to remain responsive.  So far, I have taken the "simplest route" which is to perform all my REST calls on the UI thread.  The reason this is simplest is that while making the REST calls, I don't have to concern myself with parallelism.  However ... the result of this may be the perceived sluggishness of which you speak.  The good news is that this is fixable.  Now ... a little more on the back-story of this app.  I entertain myself with these kinds of projects and some are useful and some simply wither and die on the vine because at the time I felt them either "fun" or "useful" but the reality was that others didn't find as much value.  In that vein, what I have been doing is "getting something out quickly" and if there is interest, coming back to polish and improve it.  What this means is that projects that don't resonate don't get time spent on them while ones that do, get the attention.  The impact of this is that "low hanging fruit" of the tool will get attended to VERY quickly.  Things that I find extremely useful or improve my own job, also get done quickly... however ... is there is low demand or interest in either a feature (or a project), it gets put on the back burner.  The upshot of this is that the more folks who say "I want to use this tool but the latency hurts", the quicker it gets fixed.

     

    I think that you cannot change users and have the list correctly update to the new user's tasks until you restart the app.

     

    I haven't tried, but if you change the userid that is used to connect and then execute a refresh of the task list, the list should now show what is able to be seen by that user.

     

    The app should load tasks when first opened.

     

    Fully agreed.  That will be in the next release.

     

    Is there a way to have the list display every task on the server? So it's like the inspector in Designer. And yes, that will likely require a password manager like Designer. Because of the many users involved in any process, this will become handy.

     

    I think the tool can be used to show every task on the server.  See searching later in this post.

     

    Finally, I suspect that every time the selection changes in the instance list, the entire remote call is made again. There should be an amount of caching, and perhaps a column to indicate how long ago the data was last retrieved. This should eliminate the amount of latency when just switching between two instances.

     

    You are 100% right in that every time a new task or process instance is selected, a new set of REST requests are indeed made back to BPM.  I had assumed that these would be so quick that there wouldn't be any pain but it sounds like that may have been an oversight.  Ive added caching of results with both a configurable lifespan (eg. 0 = never cache) and a force reload option to the wish list.

     

    In addition to the previous point, data should be more lazily loaded in order to speed up application response times.

     

    See previous section on synchronous calling.  Today I execute calls synchronously to the BPM server.  In principle, I can make both asynchronous calls and also paging capabilities.  When you run a query, approx how many results do you get back?

     

    Starring/favouriting of instances

     

    Noted.

     

    Searching/filtering of instances

     

    We can provide a search filter for the BPM results returned.  Right click the table and select "Select Search...".  However, I get the impression that what is wanted is maybe to "find" a result within the results returned.  That will be added to the wish list.
    Again ... MANY thanks for the responses.  Hopefully interest in this tool (or its potential) will be high and that will keep its development fueled.  It feels like holiday time with all the new presents these days.  8.5.5, new Coach technologies, Case management etc etc.

    Sam,

    You were 110% correct on the latency issues.  I attached BPM Explorer to a BPM server in a galaxy far, far away and the usefulness of BPM Explorer dropped dramatically.  Thankfully, I have now studied up on asynchronous threading and handling of long running requests and am knocking of the blocking calls one by one.  It will be a certainty that the next release will have reduced a ton of the latency.  Contact me directly if you need an earlier driver or want to test.

  • Vivekananth Thangavelu
    139 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-19T06:27:20Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-06-19T04:13:19Z

    Vivek,

    Heartbeat has now been implemented but not yet shipped.  Will be in next release for sure.

    Gr8 news Neil. thanks. Also would it be possible to list out different type of users online, Like:

    User1 - Author -Online

    User2 -Participant -Online

    User3 - Admin -Online

    (maybe am asking too much  :) )

    Vivek

  • Vivekananth Thangavelu
    139 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-19T08:17:50Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-06-19T04:13:19Z

    Vivek,

    Heartbeat has now been implemented but not yet shipped.  Will be in next release for sure.

    A little too many things are bouncing off my head, so am not sure even if it is possible or not, but here goes

    1. Environment Settings: Nodes, Clusters, Cells configuration, deployment environment pattern used
    2. Load on server: maybe like, http requests coming in, DB hits, external application integration load, memory usage, network latency,could be graphical
    3. Validation errors present in Process Applications
    4. Email Notifications to users, broadcasting messages(maybe in social portal 8.x streams)
    5. I think there is a REST API for Avatar, amy be could be integrated in the above post of detecting online users
    6. Simplified Log Viewer for viewing all the logs.

    I can think of more, but will do that with your permission :) hope have not loaded too many functionalities here.

    Vivek

  • Vivekananth Thangavelu
    139 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-19T09:45:51Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-06-19T04:13:19Z

    Vivek,

    Heartbeat has now been implemented but not yet shipped.  Will be in next release for sure.

    One more:

    Executing the deployment service of a process application. I seem to remember that there is an script for doing this.

     

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-19T23:02:08Z  

    I have dropped a new release of the code.  This one adds asynchronous access (internally) for accessing the BPM server.  We should no longer be "slow" when working with the task table.  In addition, heartbeat processing has been added (off by default).  Other UI and bug fixes have also been added.

  • Samuel Chan
    Samuel Chan
    467 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-06-27T05:44:34Z  

    There are certainly a lot of suggestions coming from Vivekananth. I'm wondering if you even have access to some of the data there. I'm wondering because I'd love to see a formatted list of errors from each of the servers in the environment.

    Way back in my first reply, I had requested the ability to view every task on the server. You did refer me to the 'searching' portion of your reply but it didn't cover the answer. After looking at another recent post of getting shared data from instances via the REST API, I discovered that you can only see the variables of a task if you're logged in as that person, but as far as I'm aware, you're free to see shared data and the instance details. I'm just curious of how you are implementing this.

  • JohnJKK
    JohnJKK
    16 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-12T02:38:21Z  

    Hi Neil

    What are the restrictions for using this tool? (IP, license, patents etc)

     

    John

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-12T02:57:48Z  
    • JohnJKK
    • ‏2014-08-12T02:38:21Z

    Hi Neil

    What are the restrictions for using this tool? (IP, license, patents etc)

     

    John

    Howdy John,

    As far as I am concerned, this is a "community project" and I'll be happy to open source it.  It is 100% written in Java and exclusively uses published APIs documented as part of the IBM BPM product.  As long as it is treated as Open Source with all that implies (i.e. no-one charges monies for it, documents where it came from and provides source access to its full content) I don't see any restrictions at all.

    Neil

  • dogren@gmail.com
    dogren@gmail.com
    438 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-12T14:10:32Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-08-12T02:57:48Z

    Howdy John,

    As far as I am concerned, this is a "community project" and I'll be happy to open source it.  It is 100% written in Java and exclusively uses published APIs documented as part of the IBM BPM product.  As long as it is treated as Open Source with all that implies (i.e. no-one charges monies for it, documents where it came from and provides source access to its full content) I don't see any restrictions at all.

    Neil

    A piece of advice Neil, that I think will help JohnJKK:

    Pick a specific open source license and make sure that all of your code is marked with it if you release the code. There are widely varying licenses and it very well might make a big difference to users of your code whether it is BSD licensed (very liberal) or GPL licensed (very strict).

    Side note, most (all?) open source licenses do not prevent people from charging money for open source. Think Red Hat. After all, if an IBM partner wanted to offer commercial support for your tool (assumably in combination with other support) would that be a bad thing?

    If you use something like a GPL license, that would prevent most of what I think you are trying to avoid (someone profiting off of your open source without giving back).

    David

  • JoeWarner
    JoeWarner
    71 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-13T11:43:18Z  

    A piece of advice Neil, that I think will help JohnJKK:

    Pick a specific open source license and make sure that all of your code is marked with it if you release the code. There are widely varying licenses and it very well might make a big difference to users of your code whether it is BSD licensed (very liberal) or GPL licensed (very strict).

    Side note, most (all?) open source licenses do not prevent people from charging money for open source. Think Red Hat. After all, if an IBM partner wanted to offer commercial support for your tool (assumably in combination with other support) would that be a bad thing?

    If you use something like a GPL license, that would prevent most of what I think you are trying to avoid (someone profiting off of your open source without giving back).

    David

    Just in support of David really, I think some statement of which license you want to apply to the code does make quite a bit of difference. There are many websites to help you pick what is the right open source license for you project - here is just one for you to try.

    If you have never read it then I thoroughly recommend taking a look at the GNU Manifesto written by Richard Stallman - probably back in the late 80's. In some ways it is a bit of an historical document nowadays but if you are interested to know more about the roots of the open source movement and see how it is evolved then it is a good read.

    Similarly the following links from the FSF may be of interest to people

    "The FSF maintains historic articles covering free software philosophyand maintains the Free Software Definition - to show clearly what must be true about a particular software program for it to be considered free software."

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-13T13:06:23Z  
    • JoeWarner
    • ‏2014-08-13T11:43:18Z

    Just in support of David really, I think some statement of which license you want to apply to the code does make quite a bit of difference. There are many websites to help you pick what is the right open source license for you project - here is just one for you to try.

    If you have never read it then I thoroughly recommend taking a look at the GNU Manifesto written by Richard Stallman - probably back in the late 80's. In some ways it is a bit of an historical document nowadays but if you are interested to know more about the roots of the open source movement and see how it is evolved then it is a good read.

    Similarly the following links from the FSF may be of interest to people

    "The FSF maintains historic articles covering free software philosophyand maintains the Free Software Definition - to show clearly what must be true about a particular software program for it to be considered free software."

    I hear ya guys but my thinking is a lot, lot simpler than this.  I work for IBM and I work on providing technical assistance to anyone interested in using or currently using the BPM product.  This affords me time to think about BPM and tinker with its functions and operations.  As I work on such, I occasionally produce a "goodie" (tool, example, illustration) that rather than keep to myself, I want to give to other BPM users.

    Its that simple ... no less and no more.  As an employee of the IBM company, efforts related to IBM BPM that I produce are "intellectual property" of IBM.  No question on that.  So that means if I wish to make it available to other BPM users I have to ask "Would the release of this be considered harmful to IBM's current or future business?" ... basically I want to make sure that I am not giving away something that IBM may wish to charge for in the future.  So far, I have always been able to answer "no" to that question.  So what that means is that I am able to make such samples and utilities available under the heading of "This is a sample or illustrative example of function that you could have written yourself as it uses only publicly exposed APIs... there is no support or warranty implied with its use".

    And that's it ... nothing more and nothing less.

  • dogren@gmail.com
    dogren@gmail.com
    438 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-13T13:34:10Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-08-13T13:06:23Z

    I hear ya guys but my thinking is a lot, lot simpler than this.  I work for IBM and I work on providing technical assistance to anyone interested in using or currently using the BPM product.  This affords me time to think about BPM and tinker with its functions and operations.  As I work on such, I occasionally produce a "goodie" (tool, example, illustration) that rather than keep to myself, I want to give to other BPM users.

    Its that simple ... no less and no more.  As an employee of the IBM company, efforts related to IBM BPM that I produce are "intellectual property" of IBM.  No question on that.  So that means if I wish to make it available to other BPM users I have to ask "Would the release of this be considered harmful to IBM's current or future business?" ... basically I want to make sure that I am not giving away something that IBM may wish to charge for in the future.  So far, I have always been able to answer "no" to that question.  So what that means is that I am able to make such samples and utilities available under the heading of "This is a sample or illustrative example of function that you could have written yourself as it uses only publicly exposed APIs... there is no support or warranty implied with its use".

    And that's it ... nothing more and nothing less.

    The problem is that in the legal world, a statement of intent isn't enough. If JohnJKK goes to his legal department and says "this a community project and should be treated as open source" they are going to tell him that that doesn't mean anything, at least not in a courtroom.

    So, even if you assert that IBM holds the copyright (which I agree that based on IBM contracts, it probably is) the question still is "what license it under?". If you release code into the wild, you have to pick. As Rush said, "if you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice".

    A lot of code you might see as an example on IBM's site has no license at all. As you say, it's provided as an example. But that means that anyone who uses that code can do whatever they want with it. Including incorporating the code into a commercial project and charging money for it, and using it without any attribution of where the code came from. And that's fine, but you said that wasn't your intent earlier. Even then, most code released should still be marked with a "no support or warranty" clause.

    Remember the whole PS toolkit debacle? No matter how many times that code was marked with "no support or warranty" people still called into IBM support demanding for support for it. Reduce the chances of having that happening to you by using a proper license.

    If you want to release code, and you want to impose conditions on its use (non-commercial use or required attribution, to use your example), you'll want to label it with a license. I bet IBM legal has a page on the intranet somewhere that addresses what they recommend. (I can't recall, but I bet it's there). If you release any significant amount of code, it would be worth checking with them: I bet it would be less painful to talk to IBM legal than you might think. As you say, they hold the rights, so you probably need to make this decision with actual legal guidance.

    David

  • NedbankWebSphere
    NedbankWebSphere
    24 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-14T11:24:10Z  

    The problem is that in the legal world, a statement of intent isn't enough. If JohnJKK goes to his legal department and says "this a community project and should be treated as open source" they are going to tell him that that doesn't mean anything, at least not in a courtroom.

    So, even if you assert that IBM holds the copyright (which I agree that based on IBM contracts, it probably is) the question still is "what license it under?". If you release code into the wild, you have to pick. As Rush said, "if you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice".

    A lot of code you might see as an example on IBM's site has no license at all. As you say, it's provided as an example. But that means that anyone who uses that code can do whatever they want with it. Including incorporating the code into a commercial project and charging money for it, and using it without any attribution of where the code came from. And that's fine, but you said that wasn't your intent earlier. Even then, most code released should still be marked with a "no support or warranty" clause.

    Remember the whole PS toolkit debacle? No matter how many times that code was marked with "no support or warranty" people still called into IBM support demanding for support for it. Reduce the chances of having that happening to you by using a proper license.

    If you want to release code, and you want to impose conditions on its use (non-commercial use or required attribution, to use your example), you'll want to label it with a license. I bet IBM legal has a page on the intranet somewhere that addresses what they recommend. (I can't recall, but I bet it's there). If you release any significant amount of code, it would be worth checking with them: I bet it would be less painful to talk to IBM legal than you might think. As you say, they hold the rights, so you probably need to make this decision with actual legal guidance.

    David

    Hi

    I successfully connect to a server but when I try to connect to subsequent servers, I get the below error?

     

    com.kolban.bpm.rest.BPMException
     at com.kolban.bpm.rest.REST.doREST(REST.java:386)
     at com.kolban.bpm.rest.REST.systems(REST.java:1016)
     at com.kolban.bpm.apps.bpmexplorer.SettingsDialog.onTestConnectionAction(SettingsDialog.java:183)

    <Snip....>

     

    Emile Kearns

    Updated on 2014-08-14T14:08:52Z at 2014-08-14T14:08:52Z by kolban
  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-14T14:08:27Z  

    Hi

    I successfully connect to a server but when I try to connect to subsequent servers, I get the below error?

     

    com.kolban.bpm.rest.BPMException
     at com.kolban.bpm.rest.REST.doREST(REST.java:386)
     at com.kolban.bpm.rest.REST.systems(REST.java:1016)
     at com.kolban.bpm.apps.bpmexplorer.SettingsDialog.onTestConnectionAction(SettingsDialog.java:183)

    <Snip....>

     

    Emile Kearns

    I'm looking into it.  I thought I'd added the ability to switch on diagnostic trace on the tool but I can't seem to find out how to achieve that again ... :-)   Back soon.

  • NedbankWebSphere
    NedbankWebSphere
    24 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-15T06:00:03Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-08-14T14:08:27Z

    I'm looking into it.  I thought I'd added the ability to switch on diagnostic trace on the tool but I can't seem to find out how to achieve that again ... :-)   Back soon.

    Neil,

     

    Do you have documentation in PDF format on the tool?

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-08-15T14:09:33Z  

    Neil,

     

    Do you have documentation in PDF format on the tool?

    Hi there,

    I'm doing a really sloppy job on this project :-) ... I'm going to be on the road for the next two weeks which means I will have time to tinker a lot more with it in the evenings.

    There is more documentation but I seem to have made it difficult to find.  From the BPM EXPLORER web page, the link at the top contains links to other pages ... see attachment.

    Neil

    Attachments

  • kolban
    kolban
    3322 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-09-02T19:19:45Z  

    Folks,

    Added a new feature to BPM Explorer that I call "Log Viewer".  This feature allows us to watch one or more log files associated with BPM and when the content changes, we can see those changes instantly.

    A video illustrating the notion can be found here:

    https://vimeo.com/groups/ibmbpm/videos/105053190

  • NedbankWebSphere
    NedbankWebSphere
    24 Posts

    Re: Announce: IBM BPM Explorer

    ‏2014-10-03T10:32:36Z  
    • kolban
    • ‏2014-08-15T14:09:33Z

    Hi there,

    I'm doing a really sloppy job on this project :-) ... I'm going to be on the road for the next two weeks which means I will have time to tinker a lot more with it in the evenings.

    There is more documentation but I seem to have made it difficult to find.  From the BPM EXPLORER web page, the link at the top contains links to other pages ... see attachment.

    Neil

    Hi Neil,

     

    Any news on the above?