Topic
1 reply Latest Post - ‏2013-05-17T02:10:07Z by Dave-Robinson
michelei
michelei
22 Posts
ACCEPTED ANSWER

Pinned topic How to get the real last change date of a CCase element.

‏2013-05-16T12:42:38Z |

Hi, I would like to write a batch file to run in a CCase view in order to have a list of all the sw source files with the their real last change date.

My target is to find out if some source code can be compiled as library since it's a long time that does not change.

If I look at the filesystem a get the last delivery date even if the file does not change for a long time.

Someone can help me?

thanks!

michele

 

 

 

 

 

  • Dave-Robinson
    Dave-Robinson
    109 Posts
    ACCEPTED ANSWER

    Re: How to get the real last change date of a CCase element.

    ‏2013-05-17T02:10:07Z  in response to michelei

    Hello Michele,

    It seems to me that you need to "tighten" the specification of what you are looking for.

    When you say "My target is to find out if some source code can be compiled as library" it implies that you are going to be interested in versions that can be made visible in a single view.

    You also mention "delivery date" which hints at it being a UCM environment, but you may mean something different (Release date?).

    So, if we start by working in a view configured off a baseline or label representing the last build / release /delivery, and looking at a stream / branch where you expect most committed changes to be since that, you could search for changes on the branch since the delivery date.

    cleartool find /vobs/src -branch "brtype(branch-name)" -version "created_since(reference-date)" -print  [-cview | -nxname]

    -cview or -nxname will restrict the output to one line per element, choose depending on whether you actually want to see the version string

    You then post-process this list to drop all but the latest version on each branch.

    You would then combine this with the output of findmerge against branches of interest

    cleartool findmerge /vobs/src -fver ".../branch-name/LATEST" -print [-short | -nxname]

    It really doesn't make a lot of sense to just look for files that have changed on ANY branch, and by doing it this way you'll also exclude any "empty"' branches with version 0 only.

     

    Dave