Topic
3 replies Latest Post - ‏2013-05-29T04:56:08Z by Alcottt
windseek
windseek
2 Posts
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Pinned topic Connecting P5 serial port to AIX VM

‏2012-08-11T23:38:12Z |
Greetings! I've used this forum off and on for some questions I've had in my inaugural AIX experience and I've just run into a problem I'm unable to solve or find any information on.

I have an IBM P5 (model 520) that I've installed PowerVM on. We have four AIX 5.3 virtual machines running smoothly on it and the network configuration seems fairly straightforward (SEAs, HEAs, etc). I've been tasked with connecting the physical serial port on the back of the machine to one of the VMs running within PowerVM, specifically, so that one of the VMs can connect to a GPS clock for NTP. Normally this is very simple to do on a physical AIX machine, but with the layer of VIOS I'm a bit lost.

I've done this many times in VMware's vSphere, for instance, to connect a tape backup drive to a VM running within vSphere. It's exceedingly easy to do and very clear through the vSphere GUI, but I cannot seem to understand how this would be done in PowerVM. I've extensively looked through the options in IVM and HMC and also cannot find any threads/forums/documentation on how this is achieved.

Is this scenario even possible to achieve? Thanks in advance for any PowerVM-guru advice :]

-Ant
Updated on 2012-08-20T18:32:17Z at 2012-08-20T18:32:17Z by seroyer
  • windseek
    windseek
    2 Posts
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    Re: Connecting P5 serial port to AIX VM

    ‏2012-08-12T00:24:05Z  in response to windseek
    I just came across the article in the link below describing how to map certain physical devices to virtual devices. It describes using lsdev to list all connected devices, and when doing so, I see the physical ethernet adapters listed as well as many other virtual adapters. I do see two "LPAR Virtual Serial Adapter"(s) listed, but I'm not seeing what I'd expect to be an entry for the physical serial ports on the back of the machine. I'm getting the feeling there's probably a very simple solution to this, I just haven't been able to wrap my head around it.

    http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/powersys/v3r1m5/index.jsp?topic=/iphb1/iphb1createtargetoptdev.htm
    • seroyer
      seroyer
      352 Posts
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      Re: Connecting P5 serial port to AIX VM

      ‏2012-08-20T18:32:17Z  in response to windseek
      I know of no way to do what you are trying to do. Unfortunately, "virtual serial" is not used to virtualize the phyiscal serial port. It is not capable of handling the more interesting capabilities of physical serial ports (like pin states). Virtual serial is really only intended for use for partition tty consoles, and you don't use the physical serial port for that (you use HMC or IVM).

      Steve
  • Alcottt
    Alcottt
    1 Post
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    Re: Connecting P5 serial port to AIX VM

    ‏2013-05-29T04:56:08Z  in response to windseek

    1.  Use the lsdev command to ensure that the virtual SCSI adapter is available. For example, running lsdev -virtual returns results similar to the following:

        name     status     description
        ent3     Available  Virtual I/O Ethernet Adapter (l-lan)
        vhost0   Available  Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
        vhost1   Available  Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
        vsa0     Available  LPAR Virtual Serial Adapter
        vtscsi0  Available  Virtual Target Device - Logical Volume
        vtscsi1  Available  Virtual Target Device - File-backed Disk
        vtscsi2  Available  Virtual Target Device - File-backed Disk

    2.  To create a virtual target device, which maps the virtual SCSI server adapter to a file-backed virtual optical device, run the mkvdev command:

        mkvdev -fbo -vadapter VirtualSCSIServerAdapter

        where VirtualSCSIServerAdapter is the name of the virtual SCSI server adapter. For example, vhost1.
        Note: No backing device is specified when creating virtual target devices for file-backed virtual optical devices because the drive is considered to contain no media. For information about loading media into a file-backed optical drive, see the loadopt command.

        The optical device is available to the client logical partition either the next time it starts, or the next time the appropriate virtual SCSI client adapter is probed (on a Linux logical partition), or configured (on an AIX® logical partition), or appears as an OPTXXX device (on an IBM® i logical partition).
    3.  View the newly created virtual target device by running the lsdev command. For example, running lsdev -virtual returns results similar to the following:

        name     status     description
        vhost4   Available  Virtual SCSI Server Adapter
        vsa0     Available  LPAR Virtual Serial Adapter
        vtopt0   Available  Virtual Target Device - File-backed Optical

    4.  View the logical connection between the newly created devices by running the lsmap command. For example, running lsmap -vadapter vhost1 returns results similar to the following:

        SVSA     Physloc                  Client PartitionID
        ----------------------------------------------------
        vhost1   U9117.570.10C8BCE-V6-C2  0x00000000  

        VTD                vtopt0
        LUN                0x8200000000000000
        Backing device     Physloc

        The physical location is a combination of the slot number, in this case 2, and the logical partition ID. The virtual device can now be attached from the client logical partition.
     

    hope it help.

     

     

    ---------------------------------

    serial port monitor

    Updated on 2013-06-04T02:28:19Z at 2013-06-04T02:28:19Z by Alcottt