Topic
11 replies Latest Post - ‏2012-07-20T07:19:54Z by SystemAdmin
Leo_52
Leo_52
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Pinned topic Data Studio madness

‏2012-06-24T08:49:30Z |
I am not sure if the transition to the Eclipse-based IBM Data Studio was the right move? For one, due to the fact that the IBM Data Studio is a Java-based application with a gigantic footprint of over 1.3 GB, it takes literally forever to load! On a 3.8 GHz Machine, equipped with a very fast primary 2 TB SATA-600 HD, I usually have to wait approx. 2 minutes before the splash screen disappears. Using Data Studio on common office computers, which are usually considerably slower than my machine, is most certainly not advisable. This is totally unacceptable! Furthermore, why on earth would one split an application into nearly 10,000 tiny little files? This slows everything down dramatically – a typical Java problem. Defragging the HD didn't result in a reduction of the load-time at all. Good old Control Center came up in no time at all. Selecting a Data Studio menu item or clicking on a symbol or tab also results in unacceptably long answer-times. Very often, quite unexpectedly really, one is asked to submit a username and a password – why?

In my opinion the move to an Eclipse-based tool is merely political and we all know at whom this step is aimed, don't we?

Or, maybe, this move is a cash-cow, since numerous users will have to attend expensive 'How to' courses aimed at using Data Studio?

Java is surely not the ideal language for programming time-critical applications. Unless, of course, we are all hungry for numerous tea-breaks! Too much tea isn't really healthy, though. Tools, like IBM Data Studio, ought to be written using a more suitable programming language, such as C or C++!

I have always placed identical copies of my IBM DB2 databases on Microsoft SQL Server and maybe that's the route to go for me? SQL Server's interface isn't only beautiful, but also very intuitive! So you girls and boys at IBM, how about creating something that closely matches the speed and ease-of-use of the Microsoft SQL Server management tools, saying good-bye to this awfully ineffective tool, called Data Studio?

Nobody would use IBM DB2 if it was as ineffective as IBM Data Studio!!!

Kind regards
Leo
Updated on 2012-07-20T07:19:54Z at 2012-07-20T07:19:54Z by SystemAdmin
  • ocgstyles
    ocgstyles
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    Re: Data Studio madness

    ‏2012-06-25T14:02:52Z  in response to Leo_52
    Agreed. Control Center was pretty terrible though too. IMHO, they really need to create something like Aqua Data Studio, with some GUI-based db2top type monitoring.

    • Keith
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
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    Re: Data Studio madness

    ‏2012-06-26T01:26:39Z  in response to Leo_52
    If you need a practical and quick tool that works on older Windows based hardware , though not as glossy as SQL Server, give Advanced Query Tool ( querytool.com ) a look. Its been around for a while now and affordable.
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
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    Re: Data Studio madness

    ‏2012-07-05T04:48:09Z  in response to Leo_52
    I totally agreed with Leo! Control Center is definitely a better and faster tool!
    • Leo_52
      Leo_52
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      Re: Data Studio madness

      ‏2012-07-06T07:34:13Z  in response to SystemAdmin
      Thank you for your comments.

      Not everything invented by IBM is state-of-the-art! I've experienced quite a number of IBM software products that where really bad – haven't they got good programming staff at IBM?

      I don't know if anyone ever used IBM Visual Age Generator? If not, you didn't miss much! When I worked on a project for the government about a decade ago, some IBM rep and a top-notch public servant must have had a beer or two too many and the IT guy (civil servant, says all, doesn't it!) decided to buy 30+ licenses to modernize the payroll, programmed in good old COBOL and running on an IBM z/OS mainframe.
      With IBM Visual Age Generator you used some sort of 4th generation language, which created COBOL code to be run on an IBM mainframe. But, Visual Age Generator wasn't visual at all and didn't even support the most common control structures, actually supported by Mainframe COBOL long before the arrival of IBM Visual Age Generator. Also, the code-overhead was dramatic! Hand-coded Mainframe COBOL code was considerably smaller, typically only 10-20% of the code created by Visual Age Generator.

      Going back to the original theme! IBM's DB2 books have always pointed out that the Control Center, because it was written in C, is very fast, which is perfectly true. The Control Center was considerably faster than Microsoft SQL Server's management tools. With Data Studio this advantage has vanished and Microsoft SQL Server Management tools outperform IBM Data Studio in every respect! All that matters with databases is plain speed, but with Data Studio we got extreme slowness instead! I don't think this will help selling IBM DB2 for LUW – unless some IBM Rep and some IT management girl or guy are going to have a drink too many again! But, let's face it, most public servants (government IT managers) are Microsoft haters and don't really care about the obvious drawbacks imposed by other software vendors.

      Kind regards

      Leo Elsenberg
      Business data processing specialist
      • SystemAdmin
        SystemAdmin
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        Re: Data Studio madness

        ‏2012-07-08T18:51:03Z  in response to Leo_52
        I believe the Control Center from DB2 Version 6 - 9 was written in Java for cross platform portability, as DB2 runs on a wide selection of validated and supported OSes. Older versions of Control Center Version prior to DB2 Version 6 were in C.

        Eclipse platform is Java plus a OS platform specific shim (to take advantage of the native OS GUI performance).

        If you use the free version of Eclipse, along with third party tools, you will find its performance acceptable (I do). IBM has been really good at building solid backend workhorse engines, but GUIs have never been IBM's forte.
        • Leo_52
          Leo_52
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          Re: Data Studio madness

          ‏2012-07-13T15:03:39Z  in response to SystemAdmin
          Hello dattark

          Yes, you are probably right! I recall reading something about Control Center performance in an old DB2 book but, since I don't keep outdated IT books, I am unable to find the reference.

          Control Center behaves like other Java programs. It doesn't remember the window size and realigns columns out of the blue – there seems to be absolutely no logic behind these behaviors! For a Java program, it was really fast though!

          Multi-platform software could be written in C, if only IBM had real C programmers at hand. There is absolutely no need for slow Java. C would dramatically boost performance, reducing the foot-print by tons of megabytes at the same time.

          I don't recall the publishers and the exact names of the products, but in the good old days of 'real programmers' there used to be quite a number of COBOL and C programming tools, which could be used for multi-platform development. The price per license was prohibitive, but this shouldn't pose a problem for IBM, should it?

          I apologize, should my posting have led to confusion, but I am currently recovering from a cerebral apoplexy.

          Kind regards
          Leo
          • SystemAdmin
            SystemAdmin
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            Re: Data Studio madness

            ‏2012-07-14T01:29:15Z  in response to Leo_52
            My experience with the IBM hardware / software stuff dates back to the System 36/38 days. I realize I am dating my static mobility here.

            Developing multi platform GUI software in C is not a trivial task. Different endians, bit sizes, architectures and windowing SDKs, GUI manager capabilities, etc. And you do have to test and QA.

            There used to be a number of third party libraries offering capabilities to create multi platform GUI software in C. Many of these magic toolkits and companies no longer exist after they burned themselves and their customers (I could name a few but serves no purpose).

            Hence the Eclipse SWT (Java + OS specific GUI shim).

            IBM does have many a good C/C++ programmer for building their back end engines as evidenced by the rock solid stability of DB2 Servers. Without these developers there is no way they could provide "validated" and "supported" DB2 products on multiple platforms, for as long as they have done.
            • Leo_52
              Leo_52
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              Re: Data Studio madness

              ‏2012-07-14T08:07:46Z  in response to SystemAdmin
              Hello dattark,

              I hoped everyone understood that my remark about 'real programmers' was ironic?!

              Many decades ago I used to program mainframe data management stuff, using COBOL as the programming language. CPU time was very expensive, so some software vendors (still alive and kicking today!) came up with solutions, which allowed coding and testing on small computers, i.e. 8-bit CP/M machines. One could write 1:1 mainframe code on the small system, run and test it. The small computer system emulated mainframe COBOL remarkably well. Furthermore, a COBOL program written for the mainframe could easily be ported to HP-UX and many other operating systems of the time. All this was possible on a small computer system running at a remarkable speed of 1 (Apple CP/M) to 4 MHz! Later systems where based on MS-DOS and did the trick a wee bit better.

              I do realize that writing a GUI application for different platforms it is not trivial, but can be accomplished.

              Thanks for your comments; anyhow, I am going to end the discussion at this point.

              Kind regards
              Leo
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
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    Re: Data Studio madness

    ‏2012-07-16T13:24:41Z  in response to Leo_52
    I been using data studio for a couple of weeks lately and I have no option than agree.

    I use Oracle in my daylight job and, for me, SQLDeveleper is far better than datastudio even if you must do most of admin stuff using SQL.

    And note that Oracle's SQLDeveleper is writen in Java (crossplatform).

    Regards.
    • SystemAdmin
      SystemAdmin
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      Re: Data Studio madness

      ‏2012-07-19T00:12:13Z  in response to SystemAdmin
      I wanted to see the query execution plan (the one you get from SQLDeveloper with a simple click or keyboard shortcut) and...

      Jezz!

      Why IBM does all so complex?!?!
      • SystemAdmin
        SystemAdmin
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        Re: Data Studio madness

        ‏2012-07-20T07:19:54Z  in response to SystemAdmin
        Hello,

        There seem to be some kind of consensus among my DB2 LUW customer for Toad for DB2 (money paying version) over Data Studio, or more generally the (money paying) Optim tools.

        Regards
        Yves-Antoine Emmanuelli