Topic
  • 6 replies
  • Latest Post - ‏2012-04-19T16:58:38Z by jyeh
rwgoebel
rwgoebel
49 Posts

Pinned topic Using Team Synchronizing

‏2012-04-17T23:05:54Z |
Is there a good reference that shows how to use Team Synchronizing in IDA 7.6.0 when comparing a local data model to a data model Head or Branch in a CVS repository? When the views open that identifies the differences between the local model and the model in repository, I select accept changes from the right and then select Update, but most of the time I get conflict warning error when there is no conflict.
Updated on 2012-04-19T16:58:38Z at 2012-04-19T16:58:38Z by jyeh
  • jyeh
    jyeh
    35 Posts

    Re: Using Team Synchronizing

    ‏2012-04-17T23:48:27Z  
    Is it possible that you attach a screen shot of the warning/error message? Also, has the model been checked in to the repository by other people since you last checked out?
  • rwgoebel
    rwgoebel
    49 Posts

    Re: Using Team Synchronizing

    ‏2012-04-18T13:51:07Z  
    I have attached a word document that describes the scenario with screen shots
  • jyeh
    jyeh
    35 Posts

    Re: Using Team Synchronizing

    ‏2012-04-18T19:10:43Z  
    • rwgoebel
    • ‏2012-04-18T13:51:07Z
    I have attached a word document that describes the scenario with screen shots
    Thanks for the detailed steps.

    In step #5, when I select "Update" from the context menu, I receive a prompt asking whether I want to save the changed model or not. If I save the changes, then I will receive the message about conflicting changes. If I don't save the changes, then I don't see the message about conflicting changes and the local model is replaced with the latest changes as well as the revision number. Is this what you experienced also?

    I suggest that you always do an 'update' as the first step if a remote change has been detected.

    If you have not done any changes to your local file, the 'update' will simply update your local file and its revision. (This is done by CVS.)

    If you have already made changes to your local file and some one else has committed a change to the same file, the Team Synchronize perspective's Synchronize view will indicate there are conflicting changes on the file. You can then open the compare editor. The compare editor will automatically resolve all non-conflicting changes. As a result, the editor will be marked as dirty. If there are conflicting changes detected by the compare editor, you can manually accept one in each conflicting change. As you are satisfied with the merged result, exit the editor and save the merged result. After you exit the compare editor, you can then 'mark as merged' on the local file and 'commit'.

    Thanks,
    Joseph
  • jyeh
    jyeh
    35 Posts

    Re: Using Team Synchronizing

    ‏2012-04-18T19:27:29Z  
    • jyeh
    • ‏2012-04-18T19:10:43Z
    Thanks for the detailed steps.

    In step #5, when I select "Update" from the context menu, I receive a prompt asking whether I want to save the changed model or not. If I save the changes, then I will receive the message about conflicting changes. If I don't save the changes, then I don't see the message about conflicting changes and the local model is replaced with the latest changes as well as the revision number. Is this what you experienced also?

    I suggest that you always do an 'update' as the first step if a remote change has been detected.

    If you have not done any changes to your local file, the 'update' will simply update your local file and its revision. (This is done by CVS.)

    If you have already made changes to your local file and some one else has committed a change to the same file, the Team Synchronize perspective's Synchronize view will indicate there are conflicting changes on the file. You can then open the compare editor. The compare editor will automatically resolve all non-conflicting changes. As a result, the editor will be marked as dirty. If there are conflicting changes detected by the compare editor, you can manually accept one in each conflicting change. As you are satisfied with the merged result, exit the editor and save the merged result. After you exit the compare editor, you can then 'mark as merged' on the local file and 'commit'.

    Thanks,
    Joseph
    I should have clarified one thing about the conflicting changes. When the Team tool detects a conflicting change on a file, it simply means there is a local change and there is a remote change on the file. It does not know how to resolve those changes and needs you to take a look at the changes through the compare editor. The compare editor knows what changes are non-conflicting and what changes are conflicting. The non-conflicting ones will be accepted into the merged result automatically. That is why those 'check' marks are there in the Structural Changes view. You will have to resolve the conflicting ones manually.

    Thanks,
    Joseph
  • rwgoebel
    rwgoebel
    49 Posts

    Re: Using Team Synchronizing

    ‏2012-04-18T22:45:35Z  
    In step #5 after I select Update, I would then select Yes to the Do you want to Save the Model. So you must select No and the update to the workstation model will occur without conflict. Not very intuitive.

    Are there any detail guidelines with images on using Team Synchronizing?
  • jyeh
    jyeh
    35 Posts

    Re: Using Team Synchronizing

    ‏2012-04-19T16:58:38Z  
    • rwgoebel
    • ‏2012-04-18T22:45:35Z
    In step #5 after I select Update, I would then select Yes to the Do you want to Save the Model. So you must select No and the update to the workstation model will occur without conflict. Not very intuitive.

    Are there any detail guidelines with images on using Team Synchronizing?
    At step #5, what you need to do is to save the merged result and exit the compare editor. (Or exit the editor and you will be prompted to save.) Then 'mark as merged'.

    There is an article in the developerWorks:

    Comparing and merging UML models in IBM Rational Software Architect: Part 4

    http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/05/0809_CVS4/

    Most of the article still applies to the IDA models.

    Thanks,
    Joseph