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1 reply Latest Post - ‏2012-03-16T20:47:08Z by ScottForstie
SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
102 Posts
ACCEPTED ANSWER

Pinned topic CPI not found in QSYS

‏2012-03-16T12:48:23Z |
Hi guys,

I am a newbie in System i, and i am struggling with this issue.
I am not able to copy files ( with content) in my system. After cpyf I receive error MCH3402:
CPYF sysoprt035/BGPF TOFILE(CPIT035/BGPF) MBROPT(*REPLACE) FMTOPT(*NOCHK)
CRTFILE(*YES)
Function check. MCH3402 unmonitored by QCPEXCON at statement *N,
instruction X'0AE0'.
0 records copied to BGPF in CPIT035.

Also I noticed that CPY cmd does not exist in QSYS LIB.

Does anyone have a clue on this?

thanks in advance.

Anuar
Updated on 2012-03-16T20:47:08Z at 2012-03-16T20:47:08Z by ScottForstie
  • ScottForstie
    ScottForstie
    38 Posts
    ACCEPTED ANSWER

    Re: CPI not found in QSYS

    ‏2012-03-16T20:47:08Z  in response to SystemAdmin
    Hello Anuar,
    First, welcome to IBM i.

    For your question, I can think of two paths to take:
    1) Open a PMR. The MCH3402 in QCPEXCON looks like an IBM defect to me and going through IBM Service is the best way to get the problem understood and solved.

    2) Use the CRTDUPOBJ command instead. We typically recommend CRTDUPOBJ over CPYF.

    CRTDUPOBJ duplicates the file whether its a physical or logical, but CPYF always creates a physical file that is SIMILAR to the source, but does not have all the attributes of the source file.

    If you point CPYF to copy an SQL view or logical file, the command produces a physical file.
    If you point CRTDUPOBJ to copy an SQL view or logical file, the command produces a logical file.

    The file's level identifier, constraints and triggers are additional examples of the difference between the two commands.
    CPYF with create file (*YES) is all about copying data, not the files attributes.

    Hope this helps.
    Regards, Scott Forstie