Topic
  • 2 replies
  • Latest Post - ‏2011-07-27T17:47:58Z by SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
64 Posts

Pinned topic Download WebSphere Application Server V8

‏2011-07-27T13:37:18Z |
Do I have to download the code (WAS V8 1 Gig) each time I want to do an installation?
Updated on 2011-07-27T17:47:58Z at 2011-07-27T17:47:58Z by SystemAdmin
  • Scott Johnston
    Scott Johnston
    101 Posts

    Re: Download WebSphere Application Server V8

    ‏2011-07-27T14:38:55Z  
    The short answer is no, you do not have to download 1GB of WAS code each time you want to do an installation.

    The longer answer is ... it depends on how you are doing the installation.

    If you install the WAS code on one machine, it has to be downloaded to that machine from a repository that Installation Manager can access. The source repositories for the WAS v8 trial editions and Developers edition are hosted by IBM. So, Installation Manager has to download the code from IBM to the machine where it is going to be installed.

    If you install the WAS code an additional time on the same machine, the Installation Manager knows that it already downloaded a copy of the code and stored it in the Installation Manager shared directory. Therefore, it will use the copy of the code that is already on the local machine as its first source and the IBM hosted repository will be accessed only if necessary (e.g., IM finds a corrupt file). There is a preference setting in Installation Manager that controls whether the IM Shared Directory stores downloaded artifacts for reuse (beside install, they can also be used for applying or rolling back maintenance packages). If this preference is disabled, or if you tell IM to remove the contents of the shared directory, then IM will have to consult another repository to obtains the code that it needs to complete certain actions.

    If you intend to install WAS on multiple different machines, then there is another option available. The companion tool for Installation Manager is called Packaging Utility (PU). What PU is intended to do is to download and recreate a remote repository at a local location. Or, in real world terms, it downloads the code from IBM and creates a repository on your own machine which can then be used locally.

    Installation Manager can use a PU created repository to do installations. The PU created repository can be hosted locally in a number of ways, such as http or https, ftp, a shared network drive or mount point, a directory on a local machine, or even a piece of fixed media like cd or dvd. Therefore, PU enables downloading the code one time and then making it available within your business or across multiple computers without having to repeatedly download the source code from IBM. Another benefit of creating local repositories is that if affords the IT support team within your business to control what is in those repositories and consequently what is available for installation. So, for example, if you want users in your business to only use a particular product at the Fix Pack 3 level, even though higher fix pack levels might be available, then the local repository could be maintained at the Fix Pack 3 level.

    Here are a few links to more information about the Packaging Utility:
    IBM Packaging Utility Overview --> https://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?dc=DB700&rs=3352&uid=swg27021004&context=SSDV2W

    IBM Packaging Utility Download --> https://www-304.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg24029225

    IBM Packaging Utility Information Center (a subset of the Installation Manager Information Center) --> http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/install/v1r4/index.jsp

    Or directly --> http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/install/v1r4/topic/com.ibm.cic.auth.ui.doc/topics/c_modes_pu.html
    Regards,
    Scott Johnston
    WebSphere Application Server
    Install & Configuration User Experience Lead
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
    64 Posts

    Re: Download WebSphere Application Server V8

    ‏2011-07-27T17:47:58Z  
    The short answer is no, you do not have to download 1GB of WAS code each time you want to do an installation.

    The longer answer is ... it depends on how you are doing the installation.

    If you install the WAS code on one machine, it has to be downloaded to that machine from a repository that Installation Manager can access. The source repositories for the WAS v8 trial editions and Developers edition are hosted by IBM. So, Installation Manager has to download the code from IBM to the machine where it is going to be installed.

    If you install the WAS code an additional time on the same machine, the Installation Manager knows that it already downloaded a copy of the code and stored it in the Installation Manager shared directory. Therefore, it will use the copy of the code that is already on the local machine as its first source and the IBM hosted repository will be accessed only if necessary (e.g., IM finds a corrupt file). There is a preference setting in Installation Manager that controls whether the IM Shared Directory stores downloaded artifacts for reuse (beside install, they can also be used for applying or rolling back maintenance packages). If this preference is disabled, or if you tell IM to remove the contents of the shared directory, then IM will have to consult another repository to obtains the code that it needs to complete certain actions.

    If you intend to install WAS on multiple different machines, then there is another option available. The companion tool for Installation Manager is called Packaging Utility (PU). What PU is intended to do is to download and recreate a remote repository at a local location. Or, in real world terms, it downloads the code from IBM and creates a repository on your own machine which can then be used locally.

    Installation Manager can use a PU created repository to do installations. The PU created repository can be hosted locally in a number of ways, such as http or https, ftp, a shared network drive or mount point, a directory on a local machine, or even a piece of fixed media like cd or dvd. Therefore, PU enables downloading the code one time and then making it available within your business or across multiple computers without having to repeatedly download the source code from IBM. Another benefit of creating local repositories is that if affords the IT support team within your business to control what is in those repositories and consequently what is available for installation. So, for example, if you want users in your business to only use a particular product at the Fix Pack 3 level, even though higher fix pack levels might be available, then the local repository could be maintained at the Fix Pack 3 level.

    Here are a few links to more information about the Packaging Utility:
    IBM Packaging Utility Overview --> https://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?dc=DB700&rs=3352&uid=swg27021004&context=SSDV2W

    IBM Packaging Utility Download --> https://www-304.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg24029225

    IBM Packaging Utility Information Center (a subset of the Installation Manager Information Center) --> http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/install/v1r4/index.jsp

    Or directly --> http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/install/v1r4/topic/com.ibm.cic.auth.ui.doc/topics/c_modes_pu.html
    Regards,
    Scott Johnston
    WebSphere Application Server
    Install & Configuration User Experience Lead
    Scott, thank you very much for your early answer.