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  • Latest Post - ‏2011-04-28T16:36:24Z by ThinkSOA
ThinkSOA
ThinkSOA
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Pinned topic Feature Focus Week: IBM WebSphere® Application Migration Toolkit

‏2011-04-25T20:26:30Z |
Feature Focus Week: IBM WebSphere® Application Migration Toolkit

Overview:
The IBM WebSphere Application Server Migration Toolkit provides a set of tools for assisting customers in migrating their applications from previous versions of WebSphere Application Server or from third-party application servers to WebSphere Application Server Version 7.0 or Version 8.0. The application migration tools utilize Rational® source code scanning technology to identify known application migration issues in Java source code, JavaServer Pages (JSP), deployment descriptors, and manifest files. Where possible, quick fixes are provided to resolve the issue. The tools are used within the Eclipse environment and give developers complete control over the process. The tools provided as part of this Beta program include

  • Application Migration Tool - WebSphere Version to Version
  • Application Migration Tool - JBoss AS to WebSphere
  • Application Migration Tool - OracleAS to WebSphere
  • Application Migration Tool - WebLogic to WebSphere

The Application Migration Tool - WebSphere Version to Version V3.0 Beta adds support specifically to mitigate Version 8 migration issues related to removed APIs, behavior changes, and deprecated features. The tool helps migrate applications from WebSphere Application Server V5.1, V6.0, V6.1 or V7.0 to WebSphere Application Server V8.0.

How to use it:
To download the Beta, go to the IBM WebSphere® Beta program at
https://www14.software.ibm.com/iwm/web/cc/earlyprograms/websphere/wsasoa/download.shtml
and click the link: Download IBM® WebSphere® Application Server Migration Toolkit V3.0 Beta at the bottom of the page. Install the tool as an Eclipse feature. There is a user's document zipped in the download file. The document provides detailed instructions on how to install the tool in Eclipse or Rational Application Developer.

See the demo:
Join us for our Feature Focus Week Reflections teleconference scheduled for Thursday, May 5, 2011. To receive invitations to our CEP sessions, simply email cepatusdotibmdotcom requesting to join. By return, you will receive a confirmation with a few questions about you and your interests. After that, you will start to receive regular invitations to our live demos.

Learn more:
Updated on 2011-04-28T16:36:24Z at 2011-04-28T16:36:24Z by ThinkSOA
  • ThinkSOA
    ThinkSOA
    2 Posts

    Re: Feature Focus Week: IBM WebSphere® Application Migration Toolkit

    ‏2011-04-28T16:36:24Z  
    Using WebSphere® Version to Version Migration Tool

    The Application Migration Tool - WebSphere Version to Version feature provides support for migrating applications from older versions of WebSphere Application Server to WebSphere Application Server Version 7.0 or Version 8.0. There are a number of issues that affect the code migration when moving between WebSphere Application Server releases. These include:

    • Changes to the Java™ Runtime Environment (JRE)
    • Changes to the level of supported Java Enterprise Edition version
    • Behavior changes in the product
    • Deprecated features
    • Removal of previously deprecated features

    The migration process can involve modifying Java source code, JavaServer™ Pages (JSP), and deployment descriptors. This tool can assist you in performing these types of code changes. This post provides a few examples of how the tool can assist in detection and migration of such code between older versions of WebSphere Application Server to Version 8.0

    Changes to the Java™ Runtime Environment (JRE)
    JRE Runtime changes can be very difficult to catch; and many times are found the hard way at runtime. The toolkit helps in detecting these changes. Here is an example:
    In J2SE 5.0 the toString() method of the class java.math.BigDecimal behaves differently from the earlier version of J2SE (version 1.4.2). J2SE 5.0 added the method toPlainString() to the BigDecimal class to give identical behavior of the toString() method in the previous version. The catch here is that if your application is depending on the format of the BigDecimal toString() method; the application will break at runtime. When the toolkit scans your application, it will detect these instanced of the toString() method of the BigDecimal class and highlight them so you can review them. If you determine that the entry indeed needs to be changed, the toolkit can apply the change (modify the toString() to toPlainString()) on that instance, or optionally on all instances it found in your code.

    Changes to the level of supported Java Enterprise Edition version
    In this example, you will see how the changes on the J2EE editions might affect your code when moving to a newer version of the specifications:
    As of JSP 2.0, it is invalid to refer to any class from the default package. So if your .jsp file contains code similar to this: <%@ page import="SomeClass" %>, the toolkit will flag this line to notify you that of this change in JSP2.0.

    Another JSP example is that in JSP 2.1, the syntax #{} is now a reserved keyword. If your JSP uses this syntax in the template text elements of a JSP, the toolkit will flag this line to notify you that you may need to escape the entry to make it work in JSP 2.1.

    Behavior changes in the product
    This example will show you how the toolkit can detect behavior differences between different releases of WebSphere Application Server.
    The default value in WebSphere Application Server V5.1 for a servlet content type was "text/html", but the default value in Version 6.0 or higher changed it to "text/plain". The toolkit will flag the classes - that are migrated from WebSphere v5.1 - and extend HttpServlet without an explicit call to setContentType() method so that you can review this change of behavior.

    Deprecated and removed features
    Some features in WebSphere older releases have been deprecated and/or removed. The toolkit will detect the usage of the deprecated APIs or the removed APIs. The applications with deprecated APIs will continue to work in WebSphere Version 8 as the functionality of these APIs continue to exist. The toolkit flags these APIs to bring it to your attention that they might be removed in a future release of WebSphere.
    The applications with removed features however must be updated to use the new APIs as the older set of APIs are no longer available. For example, applications that are migrating from WebSphere version 6.1 that utilize the IBM package com.ibm.websphere.servlet.filter will be detected. This package is no longer available in WebSphere Version 7 or higher and the application needs to change to utilize javax.servlet.filter classes.