Topic
  • 2 replies
  • Latest Post - ‏2010-06-07T19:18:24Z by SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
3545 Posts

Pinned topic activity diagram for included use cases

‏2010-05-09T10:46:47Z |
If a use case is included how can we draw its activity diagram?
I heard from someone m that it can not have a start state and it starts from a new state (e.g. A) and end in another new state (e.g. B). Then in the activity of the main use case that has an included use case, we have the start state, then we go through many activities, then we go to a state A (defined in activity diagram of the included use case) and right after that we go to the state B (again defined in activity diagram of the included use case) and then we keep on moving through different activities. Is it right??
If it so, what will happen if the included use case ends in more that one states (e.g. B and C)? In this case what we will do in main use case?
Thanks for any help or introducing any web pages that can help me?
Updated on 2010-06-07T19:18:24Z at 2010-06-07T19:18:24Z by SystemAdmin
  • ScottAmbler
    ScottAmbler
    158 Posts

    Re: activity diagram for included use cases

    ‏2010-06-04T00:13:54Z  
    A use case shouldn't know that it's included. Inclusion is like a procedure call, it has a known start and stop.

    The use case that includes it knows when the included use case is being invoked, and could show that inclusion as an activity.
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
    3545 Posts

    Re: activity diagram for included use cases

    ‏2010-06-07T19:18:24Z  
    Maybe I have a better solution. In the activity diagram of the including use case, you place a so-called "call-behavior-action". This is a normal action, but with a rake-symbol in the bottom right corner. This action carries the name of the included use case.

    See the attached white paper, figure 10.

    Good luck!
    Hans.