Topic
  • 4 replies
  • Latest Post - ‏2011-08-06T01:51:44Z by SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
SystemAdmin
156 Posts

Pinned topic help in transition to java architect

‏2007-01-25T02:58:56Z |
Hi,
I am a java programmer for past many years. Now I want to become java architect but the programming knowledge influences a lot when it comes to designing. I try to design with a programmer point of view (that is I start thinking about implmentation instead of design) and not on design and architecture.Can someone help me in providing few good links and book names to change the mindset?
Updated on 2011-08-06T01:51:44Z at 2011-08-06T01:51:44Z by SystemAdmin
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
    156 Posts

    Re: help in transition to java architect

    ‏2007-01-25T15:02:33Z  
    Your question got me to thinking how I myself have made the transition from thinking in implementations to architecture. Here are a couple of suggestions.

    1. Read!
    - Blogs of architects that you admire. My personal favorites include...
    * Grady Booch (http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks/blogs/page/gradybooch?ca=drs-bl) - IBM Fellow and guru in Design Patterns.
    * Joel Spolsky (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/) - I often go back and reread Joel's essays on such things as The Law of Leaky Abstractions (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/LeakyAbstractions.html) and his essays on Architecture Astronauts (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000018.html and http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2005/10/21.html).
    * Robert C. Martin (http://blog.objectmentor.com/articles/category/uncle-bobs-blatherings) - One of the fathers of Agile and Extreme Programming, I do not always agree with what Bob Martin says. But he always makes me think.
    * Martin Fowler (http://martinfowler.com/)
    - Journals. I read most of the articles in every issue of IEEE Software. If you are not already a member of IEEE and a subscriber of IEEE Software, you can access the IEEE Electronic Library via IBM's KnowledgeGate portal (https://w3-03.ibm.com/tools/knowledgegate/protect/Landing.wss)
    - Web sites and just plain good essays.
    * SoftwareArchitectures.Com (http://www.softwarearchitectures.com)
    * Bredemeyer Consulting (http://www.bredemeyer.com/) - Lots of good info.
    * Software-Engineer.org (http://www.software-engineer.org/index.php) - Good site, but is sometimes unavailable.
    * SEI's Essays on Software Architecture (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html) - Bunch of good essays. I really like The Tao of the Software Architect (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html#tao).
    * IBM's School of Software Architecture (http://elivedemos.raleigh.ibm.com/SoSA/index.html) - The name says it all.

    2. Learn UML. One thing that really helped me move from thinking in implementation to thinking in architecture was to learn UML. When I was doing strictly programming, if the software I was assigned to implement did not already have UML in its design specification, then I would create the UML for it. This helped me a) get the big picture, and b) learn to communicate that big picture to others (an essential skill of an architect).

    Good Luck!
    Perry Statham
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
    156 Posts

    Re: help in transition to java architect

    ‏2007-09-19T06:21:25Z  
    Your question got me to thinking how I myself have made the transition from thinking in implementations to architecture. Here are a couple of suggestions.

    1. Read!
    - Blogs of architects that you admire. My personal favorites include...
    * Grady Booch (http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks/blogs/page/gradybooch?ca=drs-bl) - IBM Fellow and guru in Design Patterns.
    * Joel Spolsky (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/) - I often go back and reread Joel's essays on such things as The Law of Leaky Abstractions (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/LeakyAbstractions.html) and his essays on Architecture Astronauts (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000018.html and http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2005/10/21.html).
    * Robert C. Martin (http://blog.objectmentor.com/articles/category/uncle-bobs-blatherings) - One of the fathers of Agile and Extreme Programming, I do not always agree with what Bob Martin says. But he always makes me think.
    * Martin Fowler (http://martinfowler.com/)
    - Journals. I read most of the articles in every issue of IEEE Software. If you are not already a member of IEEE and a subscriber of IEEE Software, you can access the IEEE Electronic Library via IBM's KnowledgeGate portal (https://w3-03.ibm.com/tools/knowledgegate/protect/Landing.wss)
    - Web sites and just plain good essays.
    * SoftwareArchitectures.Com (http://www.softwarearchitectures.com)
    * Bredemeyer Consulting (http://www.bredemeyer.com/) - Lots of good info.
    * Software-Engineer.org (http://www.software-engineer.org/index.php) - Good site, but is sometimes unavailable.
    * SEI's Essays on Software Architecture (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html) - Bunch of good essays. I really like The Tao of the Software Architect (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html#tao).
    * IBM's School of Software Architecture (http://elivedemos.raleigh.ibm.com/SoSA/index.html) - The name says it all.

    2. Learn UML. One thing that really helped me move from thinking in implementation to thinking in architecture was to learn UML. When I was doing strictly programming, if the software I was assigned to implement did not already have UML in its design specification, then I would create the UML for it. This helped me a) get the big picture, and b) learn to communicate that big picture to others (an essential skill of an architect).

    Good Luck!
    Perry Statham
    That is quite a comprehensive list for a good start and follow onwards as well.

    I think it comes to quote "Have Architectural Thinking". I think having a developer background is helpful as you understand the technology well as opposed to someone coming from no background.

    You need to shift your thinking in to more abstract, conceptual rather than completly implementation. But understanding implementation will as you will know the possible issue and risk associated and can present them before hand.

    Try to expand your knowledge on
    - Frameworks
    • Best Practices
    • Standards
    • New technologies like SOA, BPEL, Business Intelligence, BPM, etc
    • Patterns are very important
    • Join some forums

    And best is to plan your careet ahead in advance starting from what you are now and where you would see yours self in the next X, Y and Z years ahead.

    Let me know if you need any more detailed information.
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
    156 Posts

    Re: help in transition to java architect

    ‏2009-06-08T07:36:52Z  
    Your question got me to thinking how I myself have made the transition from thinking in implementations to architecture. Here are a couple of suggestions.

    1. Read!
    - Blogs of architects that you admire. My personal favorites include...
    * Grady Booch (http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks/blogs/page/gradybooch?ca=drs-bl) - IBM Fellow and guru in Design Patterns.
    * Joel Spolsky (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/) - I often go back and reread Joel's essays on such things as The Law of Leaky Abstractions (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/LeakyAbstractions.html) and his essays on Architecture Astronauts (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000018.html and http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2005/10/21.html).
    * Robert C. Martin (http://blog.objectmentor.com/articles/category/uncle-bobs-blatherings) - One of the fathers of Agile and Extreme Programming, I do not always agree with what Bob Martin says. But he always makes me think.
    * Martin Fowler (http://martinfowler.com/)
    - Journals. I read most of the articles in every issue of IEEE Software. If you are not already a member of IEEE and a subscriber of IEEE Software, you can access the IEEE Electronic Library via IBM's KnowledgeGate portal (https://w3-03.ibm.com/tools/knowledgegate/protect/Landing.wss)
    - Web sites and just plain good essays.
    * SoftwareArchitectures.Com (http://www.softwarearchitectures.com)
    * Bredemeyer Consulting (http://www.bredemeyer.com/) - Lots of good info.
    * Software-Engineer.org (http://www.software-engineer.org/index.php) - Good site, but is sometimes unavailable.
    * SEI's Essays on Software Architecture (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html) - Bunch of good essays. I really like The Tao of the Software Architect (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html#tao).
    * IBM's School of Software Architecture (http://elivedemos.raleigh.ibm.com/SoSA/index.html) - The name says it all.

    2. Learn UML. One thing that really helped me move from thinking in implementation to thinking in architecture was to learn UML. When I was doing strictly programming, if the software I was assigned to implement did not already have UML in its design specification, then I would create the UML for it. This helped me a) get the big picture, and b) learn to communicate that big picture to others (an essential skill of an architect).

    Good Luck!
    Perry Statham
    Hi I am having 4 years of experience of in java/j2ee technologies.
    I want to become a java architect. But till now in my career i did not get a chance to
    involve in design of my project. Still i want to learn design Patterns and wants to
    become a java architecture.

    Please guide me to start this.
    Please suggest me the approach. with what i should stat first.
    Even if you have any books which helps me to achieve my goal,
    please send me at sravcute@gmail.com
    Thanks
  • SystemAdmin
    SystemAdmin
    156 Posts

    Re: help in transition to java architect

    ‏2011-08-06T01:51:44Z  
    Your question got me to thinking how I myself have made the transition from thinking in implementations to architecture. Here are a couple of suggestions.

    1. Read!
    - Blogs of architects that you admire. My personal favorites include...
    * Grady Booch (http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks/blogs/page/gradybooch?ca=drs-bl) - IBM Fellow and guru in Design Patterns.
    * Joel Spolsky (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/) - I often go back and reread Joel's essays on such things as The Law of Leaky Abstractions (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/LeakyAbstractions.html) and his essays on Architecture Astronauts (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000018.html and http://www.joelonsoftware.com/items/2005/10/21.html).
    * Robert C. Martin (http://blog.objectmentor.com/articles/category/uncle-bobs-blatherings) - One of the fathers of Agile and Extreme Programming, I do not always agree with what Bob Martin says. But he always makes me think.
    * Martin Fowler (http://martinfowler.com/)
    - Journals. I read most of the articles in every issue of IEEE Software. If you are not already a member of IEEE and a subscriber of IEEE Software, you can access the IEEE Electronic Library via IBM's KnowledgeGate portal (https://w3-03.ibm.com/tools/knowledgegate/protect/Landing.wss)
    - Web sites and just plain good essays.
    * SoftwareArchitectures.Com (http://www.softwarearchitectures.com)
    * Bredemeyer Consulting (http://www.bredemeyer.com/) - Lots of good info.
    * Software-Engineer.org (http://www.software-engineer.org/index.php) - Good site, but is sometimes unavailable.
    * SEI's Essays on Software Architecture (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html) - Bunch of good essays. I really like The Tao of the Software Architect (http://www.sei.cmu.edu/architecture/essays.html#tao).
    * IBM's School of Software Architecture (http://elivedemos.raleigh.ibm.com/SoSA/index.html) - The name says it all.

    2. Learn UML. One thing that really helped me move from thinking in implementation to thinking in architecture was to learn UML. When I was doing strictly programming, if the software I was assigned to implement did not already have UML in its design specification, then I would create the UML for it. This helped me a) get the big picture, and b) learn to communicate that big picture to others (an essential skill of an architect).

    Good Luck!
    Perry Statham
    Hello,

    All are very good links to get initiated to be an Architect. Thank you very much. What is the scope of work for an Architect? I have seen at many scenarios, the end developer or the lead thinks that Architects are simply say the things in a very high level without any knowledge on how the low level implementation could be. For high level, always there could be some proven framework or module which can be customized and reused. So, can I say that the Architect's contribution will be at the initial phases of the project only. And Architects just pick some jargons words from internet and force to use it whether it is required for the project or not. All those jargons will float in the diagrams in the high level. When we try to connect them in the low level implementation, they would not fit well. So, a good Architect should have knowledge at the implementation level also. What is your opinion?