Topic
  • 3 replies
  • Latest Post - ‏2013-07-23T04:17:19Z by imsiva
imsiva
imsiva
43 Posts

Pinned topic WESB - MQ export Vs MQJMS Export

‏2013-07-19T05:24:05Z |

Hi All,

Could anyone please tell me what is the difference between MQ export and MQJMS export in WESB ? In what scenarios I should isolate these two exports and use them ?  I could see that both are able to pick the messages from remote MQ server with the help of server connection channel. Any information would be much helpful. Thanks

  • MarimuthuUdayakumar
    MarimuthuUdayakumar
    12 Posts

    Re: WESB - MQ export Vs MQJMS Export

    ‏2013-07-19T05:48:28Z  

    Hi Siva,

    This is depend the requirement to choose one of these binding.

    MQ Export Limitations :

    No publish-subscribe message distribution

    The publish-subscribe method of distributing messages is not currently supported by the MQ binding though WMQ itself supports publish-subscribe. However, the MQ JMS binding does support this method of distribution.

    Only MQ client connections are supported

    MQ client connections are the only type of connections supported.

    Channel compression is not supported

    Channel compression, which compresses the data that flows on a WebSphere® MQ channel to improve performance, is not supported.

    Limited support of headers

    WebSphere MQ headers have specific data types and parsers for them determine the data type of each field in the header. The MQ bindings currently provide support for the MQRFH and MQRFH2 header.

     

     

    JMS MQ Export Limitations :

    Response correlation scheme

    If you use a response correlation scheme, used to correlate messages in a request-response operation, you must have a dynamic correlation ID in the message.

    To create a dynamic correlation ID in a mediation module using the mediation flow editor, add an XSLT node before the import with the JMS binding. Open the XSLT mapping editor. The known service component architecture headers will be available in the target message. Drag and drop a field containing a unique ID in the source message onto the correlation ID in the JMS header in the target message.


    Bidirectional support

    Only ASCII characters are supported for Java™ Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) names at runtime.

     

  • TrushkinAndrey
    TrushkinAndrey
    113 Posts

    Re: WESB - MQ export Vs MQJMS Export

    ‏2013-07-19T10:38:03Z  

    Hi Siva,

    This is depend the requirement to choose one of these binding.

    MQ Export Limitations :

    No publish-subscribe message distribution

    The publish-subscribe method of distributing messages is not currently supported by the MQ binding though WMQ itself supports publish-subscribe. However, the MQ JMS binding does support this method of distribution.

    Only MQ client connections are supported

    MQ client connections are the only type of connections supported.

    Channel compression is not supported

    Channel compression, which compresses the data that flows on a WebSphere® MQ channel to improve performance, is not supported.

    Limited support of headers

    WebSphere MQ headers have specific data types and parsers for them determine the data type of each field in the header. The MQ bindings currently provide support for the MQRFH and MQRFH2 header.

     

     

    JMS MQ Export Limitations :

    Response correlation scheme

    If you use a response correlation scheme, used to correlate messages in a request-response operation, you must have a dynamic correlation ID in the message.

    To create a dynamic correlation ID in a mediation module using the mediation flow editor, add an XSLT node before the import with the JMS binding. Open the XSLT mapping editor. The known service component architecture headers will be available in the target message. Drag and drop a field containing a unique ID in the source message onto the correlation ID in the JMS header in the target message.


    Bidirectional support

    Only ASCII characters are supported for Java™ Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) names at runtime.

     

    I can add some more information.

    In some cases you need to use custom properties of the messages you sent. If you use MQJMS bindings, you can set them as is. In case of native MQ bindings these properties have the format, which is very difficult to read and understand. MQ Header Setter has some issues in implementation. JMS Header Setter has more correct implementation.

     

    It's unbelieveable, but performance of the MQJMS binding is much better then MQ binding. IBM WebSphere MQ has base classes for Java API and JMS API. And using of the first API is much faster. But native variant of the IBM WebSphere ESB runtime is the JMS. So, if you use MQ Binding, there is implicit transformation from base classes to the jms API. And performance degradation is visible.

  • imsiva
    imsiva
    43 Posts

    Re: WESB - MQ export Vs MQJMS Export

    ‏2013-07-23T04:17:19Z  

    I can add some more information.

    In some cases you need to use custom properties of the messages you sent. If you use MQJMS bindings, you can set them as is. In case of native MQ bindings these properties have the format, which is very difficult to read and understand. MQ Header Setter has some issues in implementation. JMS Header Setter has more correct implementation.

     

    It's unbelieveable, but performance of the MQJMS binding is much better then MQ binding. IBM WebSphere MQ has base classes for Java API and JMS API. And using of the first API is much faster. But native variant of the IBM WebSphere ESB runtime is the JMS. So, if you use MQ Binding, there is implicit transformation from base classes to the jms API. And performance degradation is visible.

    Thanks v m Marimuth and Trushkin for that good piece of information.