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1 kjloh99 commented Permalink

I total agree and support it. I feel there is a need to let kids(and their parents) to understand what is alternative available to them and how can they make use of it based on their need and affordability. While we are promoting intellectual property and promote to use software legally. and I found this is a gap which is important to bridge. and I guess it is the time when kids need to learn this part of the IT technology just like how we tell them not to steal and do thing legally. and telling them on top of buying(or just use it) there are other avenue that can do thing properly and as good.

2 cmw.osdude commented Permalink

"I guess it is the time when kids need to learn this part of the IT technology just like how we tell them not to steal and do thing legally. and telling them on top of buying(or just use it) there are other avenue that can do thing properly and as good." <div>&nbsp;</div> The problem is that this message is NOT getting out as a general rule. I think that many receive the message that if they want to be successful the only valid path is working with the commercial packages. This is an understandable side-effect of the sales process. You have to stress the benefits of a product so that people will see its value and pay for it. Yet, part of that process has generated a lot of FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt). It doesn't help that many of the people responsible for educating kids on technologies take most of their lead from the commercial software companies to decide what kids need to learn. It's not like many of the sciences where a teacher's background in chemistry or physics lets them focus on the foundations of their science, which are below a product line. There seems to be less general awareness of the building blocks that make a commercial technology product. <div>&nbsp;</div> I like to believe that it's possible to separate the education from products. For example, there is a lot of logic and technique that works equally well with any SQL relational database. The concepts of tables, keys, joins and searches are applicable universally. A strong foundation in those concepts will serve to do basic database design in any environment. <div>&nbsp;</div> I should think that open source solutions fit well into this style of learning. <div>&nbsp;</div>