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MBR,

 
This link is broken:
 
http://www-03.ibm.com/developerworks/blogs/editor/weblog.do?entryid=89917c4d0f53492d010f5921404f0d94&method=edit
 
Bruce

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This may or may not be off-topic.

 
But I couldn't help but notice in some of the sidebar examples an item called Dashboard and the inclusion of several sidebar gadgets or widgets (e.g. Graph).
 
Given the architecture of Hannover and it's ability for different screen components to exchange data contextually, I would interested to know if Lotus is planning to provide support for technologies such as Widgets or Components in the Hannover environment.
 
This could be in the form of Widgets from third parties such as the Apple Dashboard, Konfabulator (now Yahoo Widgets), Windows Live Gadgets etc. or is Lotus Planning to provide something of a similar ilk yourself?
 
Also when I look at technologies such as Crystal Xcelsius and it's ability to create collaborative components that interact with each other, it makes me wonder if Lotus has any specific plans in this area.
 
The Lotus Notes Client has been historically weak in graphical components such as Widgets & Gadgets but it now appears to me that Hannover is ideally suited to this type of technology integration, particularly if the Lotus Notes disconnected model is also exploited.
 
In the past, widgets and gadgets have been for the most part stand-alone tools and pleasent eye candy, but recent developments in Web 2.0 are positioning this type of "Personal Assembly" technologies as a major force for future innovation.
 
As this is a question that goes to the heart of the user interface, I would be interested to have your opinion on this topic Mary Beth.

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