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Comments (7)

1 localhost commented Trackback

I will refrain from taking this opportunity to discuss the ways in which Notes keeps me from building accessible applications, and instead respect your wishes.

 
/me runs off to write a program to set tab sequence orders correctly.

2 localhost commented Permalink

@Nathan -- thank you. I know that there are still challenges to building accessible apps. And Cynthia knew this, too. I am sure Cynthia would appreciate proper tabbing.

 
Cynthia was a great resource. I don't know how we can replace her and her knowledge. I will miss her, and and her seeing eye dog -- Cashmere--- who pre-deceased her. one of my "funnest" days at work whas when Cashmere kept drooling on my shoes during a meeting :)

3 localhost commented Permalink

I will refrain from taking this opportunity to discuss the ways in which Notes keeps me from building accessible applications, and instead respect your wishes.

 
and yet - you still had to mention it... didn't you. nice.
 

4 localhost commented Permalink

She is an excellent team player. I worked with her remotely, I never knew she was visually impaired. God bless her. My brief experience working with her left an impression.

5 localhost commented Trackback

This is very sad news. Cynthia and I have been colleagues in accessibility since my early days at DEC. We see each other every year at the Technology & Disabilities Conference in Los Angeles.

 
- Mike
 
PS: Speaking of accessibility, how do blind folks reply to your blog if they cannot read the CAPTCHA????

6 localhost commented Trackback

It is great!

7 ericlopresti commented Permalink

I am so sorry to hear this (and embarrassed that I heard about it so long after the fact).

 
I was the Iris UI designer assigned to accessibility for Lotus Notes R5, and by far my best decision was to help persuade my manager to hire Cynthia into the team. This must have been some time in 1998. I had read that Cynthia had basically lost her job because of her eyesight several years before, something which would illegal today of course. I figured: there could be no better person to evangelize software accessibility than someone who knew the costs so well.
 
Cynthia was an amazing person to work with. Personally, she maintained an incredible perseverance and good humor, in the face of daunting communication and engineering challenges. She worked tirelessly to push through the accessibility improvements which landed in R5 and R6. (Imperfect though those releases were, they were big improvements from the previous versions of the software.) Cynthia and I attended several accessibility conferences together, along with her excellent dog Cashmere, and through those experiences she opened my eyes to another world. The industry will miss her considerable influence.
 
-Eric LoPresti, Brooklyn

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