Inside System Storage -- by Tony Pearson

Tony Pearson Tony Pearson is a Master Inventor and Senior IT Specialist for the IBM System Storage product line at the IBM Executive Briefing Center in Tucson Arizona, and featured contributor to IBM's developerWorks. In 2011, Tony celebrated his 25th year anniversary with IBM Storage on the same day as the IBM's Centennial. He is author of the Inside System Storage series of books. This blog is for the open exchange of ideas relating to storage and storage networking hardware, software and services. You can also follow him on Twitter @az990tony.
(Short URL for this blog: ibm.co/Pearson )
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1 localhost commented Trackback

Hey Tony, great meeting you at SNW - San Diego last week. <div>&nbsp;</div> I hate that the pubilc release is that it was "operator error". Doesn't that stop short of the real problem?<div>&nbsp;</div> How about the 'system' had inadequate controls that understood that the HUMAN, a fallable entity, would be part of the SYSTEM. Systems should be engineered knowing that parts (humans) will fail (make mistakes).<div>&nbsp;</div> Reminds me of an explanation of pilot error - that I've always liked: "Pilot error is what a committee of experts determines over months of thorough and exhaustive research with seemingly limitless resources, what the pilot should have done, with roughly 20 seconds to make that same analysis."<div>&nbsp;</div> Now you've got me going - I'll try and blog something more on this, this afternoon.<div>&nbsp;</div> ..clark (www.storageswitch.com/blog)

2 localhost commented Trackback

Clark, it is so true. A system should be designed for no single points of failure and this should include single points of "operator" failure. The latest I heard before leaving Bogota was that the electric company was contemplating lucite plastic covers that snap over the switches involved, so that a technician would have to take an overt act to open the cover before hitting a switch. At least that's an improvement.

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