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1 wmklein commented Permalink

On July 23 (in Announcement ZG13-0195 ),IBM announced the BC12 hardware. (This was after the Enterprise COBOL V5.1 GA date.). This hardware also supports AARCH(10). <div>&nbsp;</div> It is important to know that just because a specific hardware platform is "newer," it doesn't guarantee that it supports the highest ARCH level. When you are acquiring new hardware, you should check to find out what ARCH level it supports (for COBOL, PL/I and C/C+++). <div>&nbsp;</div> FYI, as far as I can tell the ARCH levels now (and probably into the future) supported by COBOL, PL/I and C/C++ are (and will remain) in sync.

2 RalfSeidler commented Permalink

>> It is important to know that just because a specific hardware platform is "newer," it doesn't guarantee that it supports the highest ARCH level. <<

 
Are you sure? That would be shocking!!!!

3 wmklein commented Permalink

Yes, I am sure. Although NORMALLY new hardware "enhances" the last hardware's instruction set, it is also true that some times there are new models introduced for an "old" series of hardware. In such cases, the new models often (usually) support the instruction set that was available with the earlier models of the SAME series, not that of newer series of machines.

4 RalfSeidler commented Permalink

I've asked Steve Miller during our GSE ADL (languages) working group about that point last week. He meant that in his opinion it would never be that a "newer" hardware does _not_ support the same arch level like the "current" hardware. I shouldn' worry about that. (We are talking here about the same series of hardware.)

 
One point is also interesting: >> Note: A higher ARCH level includes the facilities of the lower ARCH level. For example, ARCH(10) includes all the facilities of the lower ARCH levels. << I think it _could_ be that very old instructions will not longer be supported, will they?