Quantum Computing

First IBM “Q Hub” in Asia to Spur the Quantum Ecosystem

Share this post:

IBM built the first vacuum tube “supercomputer” in 1944, the Mark I. The first digital mainframe, the IBM 1401, came along 15 years later in 1959. The IBM 360 mainframe made history when it was released in 1964 but it would be another 17 years before the PC arrived – a computer that people could use in their homes. Before then, computers resided in university labs and large corporations. It took a lot of specialized knowledge to know how to access and use them.

Our quantum computers are decidedly not following in the footsteps of their technological forefathers. IBM made the first five-qubit superconducting quantum computer available for anyone to experiment with, online, in 2016. That spurred the release of bigger and better systems, but just as important, it spurred more diverse and widespread use of the systems.

IBM Q’s First Commercial Asian Hub

Japan’s Keio University, IBM Q’s only commercial hub in Asia, is a microcosm of this ecosystem.

For the rest of this incredible story, go to the IBM Research Blog.

Vice President, IBM Q Strategy, Ecosystem

More Quantum Computing stories

IBM Responds to Hurricane Florence

Hurricane Florence made landfall in the Carolinas last Thursday, and already has claimed at least 18 lives, left more than one million people without power, and caused record-breaking floods. Though now downgraded to a tropical storm, Florence’s progress has slowed – which means it continues to saturate already-flooded areas with even more rain. IBM and […]

Continue reading

Customer Loyalty Revisited with Advanced Personalization

Customer loyalty has become an ever more complex and nuanced discipline. Consumers might stick with a brand because of product quality and price breaks, but they also expect something more than just a transactional relationship. Knowing that companies collect their personal information, consumers want to see that data be the foundation of smart, personalized — […]

Continue reading

Driving Transformation: How Connected Vehicles Challenge OEMs

When it comes to buying a car today, connected technologies are the new deal-breakers. According to the recent “Car Tech Impact Study” from AutoTrader, 89 percent of buyers are willing to wait for must-have technology features, and nearly half would switch brands in order to get the features they want. It’s no surprise, then, that […]

Continue reading