Cloud computing

Don’t be a casualty in the cloud wars

Share this post:

The cloud has become a powerful tool for businesses rapidly developing new products that appeal to the public. Niche businesses that can do this have disrupted existing business models and industries. Traditional businesses are fighting a war against enemies that fight in dynamic spaces, offering users less functionality but a more personalized experience. The applications these businesses provide morph to user wants and needs more easily, leaving traditional businesses lumbering behind. Most businesses are trying to fight that war in the cloud, a war that plays to their enemy’s strengths and their weaknesses. But there is a better way.

Guerrilla warfare with hybrid cloud

Instead of fighting this traditional cloud battle, some companies should be employing guerrilla cloud warfare. Guerrilla cloud warfare allows a company to build powerful services in the environment where they already have existing assets and experience, only then launching those services against their enemies in the cloud. How does a traditional business engage in guerrilla warfare? With hybrid cloud! Businesses that win in the cloud wars will make the best use of the assets that make them unique.

Traditional assets alone won’t win the day. It would be like launching missiles that never reach the enemy. The only way to win is to bring your weapons into your opponent’s territory and take action where they live. That’s what hybrid cloud is: Companies bringing their best business weapons to fight on a new battlefield.

Hybrid cloud reimagined

Business leaders should be thinking of bringing these weapons to bear in new ways. For instance, traditional business applications often lead the user down a process path because it owns the process a user must follow. Today those traditional applications are completely cut out from users who rely solely (or even principally) on mobile devices. Instead of creating applications, businesses need to think in terms of creating discrete services that can be made available to developers creating applications on those mobile devices, using the pay-as-you-go model that has become standard in an API economy. By first identifying good candidates for services and quickly transforming them into offerings, a business could sell these new assets as well as their full stack.

Of course, this may be easier said than done as it is often hard to figure out the best starting points. Businesses need to attack not only the technical issues around this kind of change, but also the cultural shift in enterprise IT needed to become successful in this new theater of operations. These require thoughtful reflection as well as a set of technologies that enable the shift.

Cloud has changed the way business uses IT assets. It has moved the war to an entirely new front. Unless businesses learn to fight like guerrillas, they will be casualties in the war.

Learn more about how to differentiate your hybrid cloud services.

don't be a casualty in the cloud wars

Distinguished Engineer, Chief Architect for Cloud

More stories

Accelerate AI projects with the right infrastructure (Part two)

Last week, I talked about how implementing AI solutions in your organization is a lot like climbing a ladder–going it alone can be risky, but a good AI infrastructure is like having a trustworthy friend to help steady your climb. In my view, a crucial piece of that infrastructure support is the IBM Power AI […]

Continue reading

Accelerate AI projects with the right infrastructure (Part one)

If you read the tech press, you’ll hear that artificial intelligence (AI) is all the rage these days.  And whether or not they are doing it well, everyone is saying that they’re engaging in AI. One thing is certain: organizations across industries are running fast to be a part of the AI revolution. In this […]

Continue reading

The evolution of the IBM Blockchain Platform: Choice and control on IBM Z and LinuxONE

We’re living in a multicloud world. Today, 85 percent of businesses rely on multiple clouds to meet their IT needs, with 71 percent using more than three[1]. What this means in practice for enterprise clients is that they have multiple architectures in place. This may be fine for “tried and true” workloads–like credit card processing […]

Continue reading