IBM Research Almaden

Enabling Fabrication Beyond 7nm

How did we get from the Palm Pilots of the 90s to the ultra-powerful smart phones of today? In large part, because of scaling, where integrated circuits are made with smaller feature sizes fitting more and more circuit elements in the same area of silicon at each technology generation. This sets our expectations that in […]

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Detecting the Magnetism of a Single Atom’s Nucleus

Our team at IBM Research − Almaden in Silicon Valley has detected the magnetism of a single atom’s nucleus, a feat that opens the door to using the nucleus as a way to sense and control magnetism at the atomic scale. This breakthrough, recently published in the journal Science, was achieved by measuring the magnetic […]

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Helping to Improve Medical Image Analysis with Deep Learning

Medical imaging creates tremendous amounts of data: many emergency room radiologists must examine as many as 200 cases each day, and some medical studies contain up to 3,000 images. Each patient’s image collection can contain 250GB of data, ultimately creating collections across organizations that are petabytes in size. Within IBM Research, we see potential in […]

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Teaching AI to Learn from Non-Experts

Today my IBM team and my colleagues at the UCSF Gartner lab reported in Nature Methods an innovative approach to generating datasets from non-experts and using them for training in machine learning. Our approach is designed to enable AI systems to learn just as well from non-experts as they do from expert-generated training data. We […]

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Stereo Vision Using Computing Architecture Inspired by the Brain

Our Brain-Inspired Computing group at IBM Research-Almaden will be presenting at the 2018 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR 2018) our most recent paper titled “A Low Power, High Throughput, Fully Event-Based Stereo System.” The paper describes an end-to-end stereo vision system that uses exclusively spiking neural network computation and can run […]

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How Big Data is Making Scientists Smarter about Ebola

The 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak was a tragedy of enormous proportions. It caused the death of over 11,000 people, while more than 28,000 cases have been reported. From a socioeconomic, perspective, it has brought close to collapse the three African countries most directly impacted: Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea. During the outbreak and immediately […]

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Cell engineering can give IBM Watson “microscopic eyes”

What if your cells could actually see? Today, scientists at IBM Research’s Almaden lab in the Silicon Valley are pioneering a new field of discipline – cell engineering – that uses cells as sensors to transmit new information to researchers about disease and the environment. In collaboration with University of California-San Francisco, our lab will […]

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Ninjas vs. Superbugs

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria – or, superbugs – are a growing threat. And MRSA is one of the worst. Learn more about Ninja Polymers in the infographic here, and share individual story sections by clicking on the embed icon in the upper right-hand corner of each module.  

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Bartending Robots & Spintronics

I’m an engineer in the Magnetoelectronics and Spintronics group at IBM Research – Almaden. We explore the physics, materials science and potential technology applications of materials we create one atomic layer at a time with our ultra-high vacuum thin-film deposition tools. But I’ve also been making costumes, props and gadgets since I was eight years […]

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The Algorithms of Show Business

New IBMer begins work to make Watson work smarter, having made HBO’s Silicon Valley look smarter Vinith Misra “We need to talk.” Generally not something you want to hear from your PhD advisor. But when it was followed by, “Have you heard of HBO?”, then-Stanford student, now-IBM Watson engineer Vinith Misra was intrigued (and as […]

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