IBM Q experience

Quantum Risk Analysis

Using quantum algorithms, we have developed a new approach to risk analysis, provideing a significant speed increase over established classical algorithms.

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IBM Q in the Arctic: 76.4° North

I’m sitting in front of my microscope, trying to fight against the first onset of seasickness by gazing out to sea as the horizon goes up and down. Counting microplastic particles seemed easy on paper, but distinguishing fly wings from plastic films and fish eggs from plastic pellets are problems that are becoming ever too […]

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Join the Quantum Community

Today, at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco, I showed a simple machine learning demo, which I ran live on a real quantum computer in New York, through the cloud. Sure, that problem could just as easily have been solved using a classical algorithm on your laptop. But wouldn’t that have been a lot less exciting? […]

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First IBM Q Hub in Asia to Spur Academic, Commercial Quantum Ecosystem

IBM built the first vacuum tube “supercomputer” in 1944, the Mark I. The first digital mainframe, the IBM 1401, came along 15 years later in 1959. The IBM 360 mainframe made history when it was released in 1964 but it would be another 17 years before the PC arrived – a computer that people could […]

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Celebrating the IBM Q Experience community, and their research

The other day, my friend and colleague Jay Gambetta (who leads the theory and software teams in IBM Q, and who the MIT Tech Review referred to as a “tall, easygoing Australian”) told me there are now over 60 research publications written by members of our extended community, who used the IBM Q Experience and […]

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Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professors, students and developers

Submissions for the IBM Q Prizes are now open: IBM Q Awards website. Whether its PCs, smartphones or quantum computers, one fact remains consistent: the recipe for success relies heavily on building an engaged and thriving ecosystem. For example, on 12 August 1981 when IBM introduced the IBM 5150 (eventually called the IBM PC) at […]

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The future is quantum

Some of the most important technical advances of the 20th century were enabled by decades of fundamental scientific exploration, whose initial purpose was simply to extend human understanding. When Einstein discovered relativity, he had no idea that one day it would be an important part of modern navigation systems. Such is the story of quantum […]

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