IBM Q experience

Get to the heart of real quantum hardware

Our newest freely available quantum computing system takes one more step toward bringing the lab to the cloud. It features pulse-level control, and when coupled with today’s release of the new version of Qiskit (version 0.14), any IBM Quantum Experience user now has the ability to construct schedules of pulses and execute them. The role of experimental quantum physicist is now available to anyone with internet access.

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Quantum Risk Analysis

Using quantum algorithms, we have developed a new approach to risk analysis, provideing a significant speed increase over established classical algorithms.

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IBM Quantum in the Arctic: 76.4° North

EPFL student first to use the IBM Q Experience in the Arctic.

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Join the Quantum Community

Today, at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco, I showed a simple machine learning demo, which I ran live on a real quantum computer in New York, through the cloud. Sure, that problem could just as easily have been solved using a classical algorithm on your laptop. But wouldn’t that have been a lot less exciting? […]

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First IBM Quantum Hub in Asia to Spur Academic, Commercial Quantum Ecosystem

The first commercial IBM Quantum hub in Asia, Keio University, announced its own members: JSR, MUFG Bank, Mizuho Financial Group, and Mitsubishi Chemical.

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Celebrating the IBM Quantum Experience community, and their research

More than 60 technical papers have been published, based on experiments run on the IBM Quantum Experience.

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Now Open: Get quantum ready with new scientific prizes for professors, students and developers

Submissions for the IBM Q Prizes are now open: IBM Q Awards website. Whether its PCs, smartphones or quantum computers, one fact remains consistent: the recipe for success relies heavily on building an engaged and thriving ecosystem. For example, on 12 August 1981 when IBM introduced the IBM 5150 (eventually called the IBM PC) at […]

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The future is quantum

Some of the most important technical advances of the 20th century were enabled by decades of fundamental scientific exploration, whose initial purpose was simply to extend human understanding. When Einstein discovered relativity, he had no idea that one day it would be an important part of modern navigation systems. Such is the story of quantum […]

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