Science

Peeking into AI’s ‘black box’ brain — with physics

Our team has developed Physics-informed Neural Networks (PINN) models where physics is integrated into the neural network’s learning process – dramatically boosting the AI’s ability to produce accurate results. Described in our recent paper, PINN models are made to respect physics laws that force boundaries on the results and generate a realistic output.

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IBM’s innovation: Topping the US patent list for 28 years running

A patent is evidence of an invention, protecting it through legal documentation, and importantly, published for all to read. The number of patents IBM produces each year – and in 2020, it was more than 9,130 US patents – demonstrates our continuous, never-ending commitment to research and innovation.

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European Research Council funds research into single-molecule devices by atom manipulation

A team formed by IBM Research scientist Dr. Leo Gross, University Regensburg professor Dr. Jascha Repp, and University Santiago de Compostela professor Dr. Diego Peña Gil has received a European Research Center (ERC) Synergy Grant for their project “Single Molecular Devices by Atom Manipulation” (MolDAM).

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Could AI help clinicians to predict Alzheimer’s disease before it develops?

A new AI model, developed by IBM Research and Pfizer, has used short, non-invasive and standardized speech tests to help predict the eventual onset of Alzheimer’s disease within healthy people with an accuracy of 0.7 and an AUC of 0.74 (area under the curve).

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IBM 5 in 5: Radically Accelerating the Process of Discovery will Enable Our Sustainable Future

This year’s IBM "5 in 5" predictions focus on accelerating the discovery of new materials to enable a more sustainable future. In line with the United Nation’s global call-to-action through its Sustainable Development Goals, IBM researchers are working to speed up the discovery of new materials that will address significant worldwide problems.

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Using machine learning to solve a dense hydrogen conundrum

Hydrogen is the simplest element in the universe, yet its behavior in extreme conditions such as very high pressure and temperature is still far from being well understood. Dense hydrogen constitutes the bulk of the content of giant gas planets and brown dwarf stars and it’s a material of interest for both fundamental physics and […]

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IBM PAIRS Geoscope Reveals Environmental and Societal Impacts of COVID-19

Using sophisticated geospatial technology known as IBM PAIRS Geoscope, IBM researchers are shedding light on the environmental and societal impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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New Macromolecule Could Hold Key to Reversing Antibiotic Resistance

To address the challenge of antibiotic resistance, scientists from IBM and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology have published new findings in Advanced Science, which unveil the effectiveness of a new polymer in the fight against resistant bacteria.

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Programming microfluidic functionalities in real-time with virtual channels

Work by our group at IBM Research Europe in Zurich has led to a new method for the rapid implementation of microfluidic operations. By tailoring the potential landscape inside a flow cell, we form so-called “virtual channels” on demand to perform high-precision guiding and transport, splitting, merging and mixing of microfluidic flows. This allows to […]

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Biological remodelling of liquid water

It is well known that the human body is mostly composed of water: The brain, for example, is 75 percent water and even bones are not “dry” – containing as much as one third water. All of this water maintains the shape and structure of biological cells and is involved in numerous biochemical processes. It […]

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How the brain produces a rhythm discovered almost 100 years ago

In the May issue of Communications Biology features a new paper that was done in collaboration with Prof. Miles Whittington of Hull York Medical School (U.K.) and his group. In this new paper, we describe the likely cellular mechanism of the oldest known EEG (electroencephalogram) rhythm: the alpha rhythm, at around 10 cycles per second.  […]

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COVID-19 HPC Consortium Calls for More Proposals from Researchers Worldwide

Researchers globally have been using the world’s fastest computers thanks to the COVID-19 HPC Consortium for nearly two months now – but there is still supercomputing capacity, and the partnership is calling for more proposals. “There is real hunger on the free resource providers side for good projects,” said Jim Brase, Program Leader at Lawrence […]

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